Joe Russo’s Almost Dead Shares Pro-Shot Video Of Bob Weir’s “Gonesville” Debut And “Shakedown Street”

first_imgIn the beginning of June, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead released the official soundboard of their 1st Bank performance. You can take a listen to the entirety of the show here, and check out the setlist from the night below.[Photo: Andrew Rios]Setlist: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead | 1st Bank Center | Broomfield, CO | 4/29/2017Set One (8:39PM – 10:17PM): Shelter From The Storm @ (TH) -> Bertha > Let It Grow -> No Quarter Jam # -> Help On The Way > Slipknot! $ > Throwing Stones, Must Have Been Roses, Gonesville % (SM) -> Shakedown Street ^Set Two (10:45PM – 12:53AM) &&: Morfbeats & -> Space *-> Dark Star + -> Half Step -> Estimated Prophet -> Terrapin Suite > The Other One > Eyes Of The World @@Encore One: One More Saturday Night -> Cold Rain & Snow Jam ## -> One More Saturday Night Reprise ##, Not Fade Away $$ -> Tequila Jam -> Not Fade Away RepriseEncore Two: Ripple, Born To Run %%Notes:@ – Bob Dylan Cover, First Time Played by Almost Dead# – Not played by Almost Dead since The Belly Up, Aspen, CO, 2016-07-02, a gap of 32 shows$ – With a “Duo Jam”% – Bob Weir cover, from “Blue Mountain”, First Time Played by Almost Dead^ – With short China Cat & Cold Rain & Snow Jams (Band)& – Kind of a Drums -> Space Hybrid, with Joe, Adam Morford, Billy Martin & John Medeski, playing crazy percussion instruments created & built by Adam Morford on a riser behind Joe’s kit. Eventually Marco, Tommy, Dave & Scott joined in & the segment evolved into Space. First Time Played by Almost Dead.&& – Entire second set from Space on & encore with Stuart Bogie on Sax, flute & clarinet.* – With John Medeski on percussion & then Hammond Organ and Billy Martin & Adam Morford on Percussion+ – With John Medeski on Hammond Organ and Billy Martin & Adam Morford on [email protected]@ – With a tease of what I think was a Tears for Fears tune (TH)## – First Time Played by Almost Dead$$ – With Black Throated Wind teases (SM), Chuckles (WOLF) Teases (SM) and a “Duo Jam”%% – Played with the house lights on On April 29th, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead performed at 1st Bank Center in Broomsville, Colorado, along with supporting act Medeski, Martn & Wood. The show was originally scheduled as the Grateful Dead-inspired ensemble’s headlining Red Rocks Amphitheatre debut, though the performance was rescheduled to the end of August due to weather concerns. Despite these last minute changes, Joe Russo’s Almost Dead put on a fine performance at the sold-out indoor arena, which saw the act offer a number of all-star collaborations, multiple song debuts, and stellar renditions of classic Grateful Dead tunes.Now For Something Completely Different: Joe Russo’s Almost Dead’s Spectacular Arena Debut [Full Audio]Today, the band released pro-shot video of their takes on Bob Weir’s “Gonesville” and “Shakedown Street,” which closed their first set of the night. “Gonesville” is a cover off of Bob Weir’s recently released solo album, Blue Mountain, and Almost Dead’s rendition of the classic-sounding number heavily featured Marco Benevento on the grand. From there, the group closed out the first set with “Shakedown Street,” making for a high-energy climax ahead of set break, featuring teases of “China Cat Sunflower” and particularly interesting rhythmic counterpoint offered by Scott Metzger. You can watch the pro-shot video of the group’s first-set closer at 1st Bank Center, below courtesy of the band.last_img read more

The String Cheese Incident Announces 2018 New Year’s Run

first_imgFollowing a successful summer with stops at High Sierra Festival; Eugene, OR; and a seven-night run throughout Colorado, the String Cheese Incident has announced their return to Broomfield, CO’s 1STBANK Center for a three-night New Year’s run and 25th-anniversary celebration on December 28th, 29th, and 31st.This marks the seventh NYE Celebration for the String Cheese Incident since going on hiatus in 2007, and their sixth New Year’s Eve at their home state’s 1STBANK Center. Last year, the band celebrated NYE with a special East Coast celebration at Port Chester, NY’s Capitol Theatre, the only time they’ve rang in the New Year outside of Colorado since their 2006’s San Francisco run.Read the bands full announcement below:Dearest Cheese Family, we are super excited to announce that… (drum roll please)… SCI will return to the 1STBANK Center for three nights this NYE, December 28, 29, and 31 in Broomfield, CO. This New Year’s run will be extra special, as it marks a significant milestone in our history as a band. It’s hard to believe it was 25 years ago that we all got together in Crested Butte to play our first gig at the Center For the Arts. As we approach a quarter century of Incidents, we are being flooded with so many amazing memories that we’ve shared with you all. Needless to say, it’s been quite a journey so far!This New Year’s will be the kick-off event of our 25th Anniversary, and we plan on celebrating with you all the way through 2019! It’s going to be a big year, let’s start it out with a bang!For the band’ special 25th-anniversary, they are offering up a formal invitation for “you all to join us for these three very special New Year’s Incidents, where we will reminisce on good times past, while simultaneously launching into the next era of SCI.” The String Cheese Incident is calling on its fans to help reminisce over the past 25 years, by submitting photos from your memorable Incidents!You can watch the String Cheese Incident’s rowdy New Year’s Ever “Rivertrance”  from the Capitol Theatre last year below:The String Cheese Incident – “Rivertrance” – 12/31/2017[Video: The String Cheese Incident]In addition to single GA Tickets, String Cheese Incident will offer 3-Day GA Passe to the New Year’s run for $150.00 for all three nights. The band will also offer Ultimate Incident VIP & Travel Packages here. All ticket types will go on sale next Tuesday, Sept. 25th at 11am MT via stringcheeseincident.com. A public on sale will follow on Friday, Sept 28th.The band notes that, this year, the 1STBANK Center will be entirely GA all three nights, with plenty of space on both the floor and the seated bowl for ticket purchasers to choose from upon entering. Each night access to the floor will be first come, first served, and space will be limited. Up next for the String Cheese Incident is a brief fall run, with stops at Hulaween, Philadelphia, and Worcester, MA. For more information and ticketing information, head to the band’s website.last_img read more

Catering for our Customers with Converged Solutions

first_imgCustomers are the cornerstone of the Converged Platforms Division’s vision and strategy. Our unflinching focus on our customers’ needs enables us to not only fully understand the technology challenges they face today – and deliver solutions that address those challenges, but also anticipate the issues they’re likely to face tomorrow.Against this backdrop I’m absolutely thrilled to see that the Converged Platforms Division’s presence at EMC World 2016 is enhanced by the participation of scores of satisfied customers who are demonstrating how they achieved business transformation using converged solutions.Leading the charge is Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, a nationally recognized, fully integrated academic medical center and health system. Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center needed to replace aging IT infrastructure with next-generation technologies, avoid project delays due to infrastructure and space constraints, and use huge untapped capacity. Using three VCE Vblock Systems Wake Forest migrated to a stable, converged IT environment that ensures a fast time to value, is easy and less costly to support and maintain, is highly secure, and lets Wake Forest focus on strategic priorities around enhancing patient care and advancing medical research. To find out more details you can read the full case study here and watch the video here.Wake Forest was also awarded the Transformation Catalyst Award inthe converged infrastructure category in the ‘Leaders of the Modern Data Center Awards’ on Sunday. The accolade recognizes outstanding customer-advocates who illustrate the Modern Data Center advantage. A visionary customer, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center understands the advantages that a modern data center can deliver and fully deserves to be recognized as a Leader of the Modern Data Center.An outstanding example of a healthcare customer who identified the importance of hyper-converged infrastructure early is Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A, a leading provider of diagnostic imaging products and medical informatics solutions. A pioneer in technology awareness and deployment in medical imagery, Fujifilm Medical Systems wanted to help its customers modernize their IT infrastructure in order to deliver the best possible patient care. The company serves a range of customers: small radiology practices and radiology reading groups, rural hospitals, urban hospitals, large hospital groups, and government-supported facilities such as the VA.  Using the VCE VxRail Appliance Fujifilm Medical Systems will deliver its imaging solutions, such as MRIs, CAT scans, digital x-rays, ECGs, echograms and ultrasounds. To find out more about how Fujifilm Medical Systems improved patient care while positively impacting their bottom line, watch this video.In today’s world where there is a direct correlation between keeping healthy and playing sports, it’s good to see that we have customers in both segments – healthcare and sports, moving towards a modern datacenter. Dimension Data is another example of a company committed to helping sports transform through digital technology. EMC and VCE are enabling Dimension Data to store, analyze and distribute real-time telemetric race data for their cycling team. At each race Dimension Data’s mobile data truck, powered by VCE Vblock Systems, enables better race analysis, assessment of race tactics and shows how essential each rider’s role is within their team.A modern data center for a forward looking company delivering a 21st century sports experience, if you are attending EMC World don’t forget to drop by Dimension Data’s booth #647.Land Rover BARFrom professional cycling to sailing, the Converged Platforms Division is also supporting Land Rover BAR in its bid to become the first British team to ever win one of sport’s oldest and most revered trophies – the America’s Cup.  As in most high-performance sports, there are very few things that happen in a campaign that don’t involve IT, and in addition to EMC providing all of the storage needs this rapidly growing business demands, the team uses VCE VxRail to deliver the speed, reliability and accuracy required to consolidate race and testing data, run real time analysis and consequently maximize the team’s performance – irrespective of location.At EMC World you can find the Land Rover BAR team at booth #757These are just a few examples. There are many more VCE customers at EMC World showcasing how they have taken advantage of converged solutions to modernize and transform their IT infrastructure and deliver business value. From breathing fresh life into healthcare IT to modernizing professional cycling, the Converged Platforms Division is constantly evolving its advanced converged platforms portfolio to offer more choice than ever before to meet a diverse range of workloads, applications and use cases.For more Converged Platforms Division Customer Success stories, click here.last_img read more

Fire captain accused of stealing vaccine turns himself in

first_imgBARTOW, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say a Florida fire captain accused of stealing COVID-19 vaccines meant for first responders has turned himself in. The Polk County Sheriff’s Office says Polk County Fire Rescue Capt. Anthony Damiano was booked into jail Wednesday on a felony charge of falsifying an official record as a public servant and misdemeanor petit theft. Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said at a press conference Tuesday that paramedic Joshua Colon was arrested Monday for covering up Damiano’s theft. Damiano was free on $1,250 bail. Jail records didn’t list whether he had an attorney who could comment.last_img

Student Tent City to Focus on Homeless Experience

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.Champlain College students plan to spend the week of Nov. 17-21 learning about what conditions are like for a growing number of families and individuals who have lost their home. Some 180 students have already made the commitment to sleep in tents on the Aiken green on campus and attend workshops and seminars to learn about social services and the underlying reasons related to homelessness. A series of workshops and lectures will also explore the issue throughout the week.The fourth annual Tent City is being held during the national observance of Hunger and Homeless Awareness Week, according to Ashley George, service coordinator for the Center for Service and Civic Engagement at Champlain College. Each year, the week before Thanksgiving, the National Coalition for the Homeless (www.nationalhomeless.org) helps to organize events across the country to take part in a nationwide effort to bring greater awareness to the problems of hunger and homelessness.We are working hard this year to emphasize the educational aspect of Tent City. We are not trying to simulate being homeless, but rather to raise the overall awareness of our students, staff and faculty about the challenges people are facing in these economic times, George explained. This year, more students signed up to spend a night or more in the tent city on the campus Aiken Green than in year’s past, George noted, and organizers had to limited the number of overnight participants to 60 students per night. Students will also be able to experience a typical soup kitchen menu at the dining hall with a limited menu similar to those often served in homeless shelters and food shelves. Events like this are tremendously important to helping the community understand the issues of homeless people, said Deb Bouton of the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS). We can’t do the work we do without the support of the community and an event like this one by Champlain College students is amazing. Bouton said COTS is already facing long waiting lists for shelter space for families and individuals and expects the need to grow as winter weather arrives. A series of workshops and seminars will complement the Tent City experience, George said. There will also be a fund-raising aspect to the weeks event with students collecting donations to help the Committee on Temporary Shelter with its community programs. Last year, students raised nearly $2,500 for COTS. Champlain College Tent City guest speakers every evening at 8 p.m.: Monday, Nov. 17: Former Champlain College students will talk about planning the first Tent City. Tuesday, Nov. 18: The Poverty Wall, an interactive activity will explore the stereotypes that surround people who are homeless. Wednesday, Nov. 19: Patrick De Leon, the drop in Coordinator at Spectrum Youth and Family Services, will speak about youth homelessness issues in Vermont. Thursday, Nov. 20: A panel of staff and clients from COTS (Committee on Temporary Shelter) will speak about the experiences of individuals and families who are homeless in Vermont. What are the real barriers to housing in Burlington and in Vermont? There will also be time for questions and comments at the end. A candle light vigil on Aiken green will directly follow the speakers at 9 p.m.Champlain College Tent City daytime activities and workshops: Monday, Nov. 17, 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Hauke Lounge Social Service Office- Mock intake procedure, anyone is welcome to come meet with a social worker to experience the process of applying for food stamps, Section 8 housing, and other services. Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2 to 3 p.m., meet at Tent City on Aiken green – Walk to COTS Shelters, students will walk to one of the COTS family shelters as well as the daytime and overnight shelters for Individuals. Wednesday, Nov. 19, 1 to 2 p.m. in Hauke Lounge Staff from the Vermont Workers Center will come to discuss issues such as Healthcare and Livable Wage and how they impact people that are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Thursday, Nov. 20, noon at the Tower Room at the IDX Student Life Center, Brown Bag Lunch focusing on poverty and homelessness with a guest speaker from COTS. This event is sponsored by The Office of Diversity and Inclusion.All events are free and open to the public. To learn more, contact Service Coordinator Ashley George at the Center for Service and Civic Engagement at Champlain College, (802) 383-6632. Or by email at [email protected] To learn more about COTS, visit www.cotsonline.org or call 864-7402. Champlain College was founded in 1878 and currently has nearly 2,000 undergraduate students. To learn more about Champlain College, visit www.champlain.edulast_img read more

Contractor charged with failure to maintain worker’s comp, violating work-stop order

first_imgAttorney General William H. Sorrell announced today that his office has charged Williston-based home improvement contractor Donald Bevins with three counts of failing to maintain workers’ compensation insurance and two counts of violating a Vermont Department of Labor Stop Work Order.According to documents on file with the Court, Bevins failed to secure workers’ compensation for two of his employees performing roof repairs in Richmond, Vermont and another employee performing roof repairs in Essex, Vermont. In addition, Bevins continued to perform home repairs in Essex and Essex Junction Vermont after the Department of Labor ordered him to stop working immediately.Bevins pled not guilty to all counts and was released pending trial on the condition that he, any company he has an ownership interest in, or anyone working at his direction or request, not perform any home repair.Anyone with a complaint against Donald Bevins is encouraged to contact the Attorney General’s Consumer Assistance Program at (802) 656-3183 or toll free in Vermont: (800) 649-2424. Source: Attorney General, February 17, 2011last_img read more

State judge’s ruling raises another hurdle for planned $9.4 billion Formosa Plastics plant in Louisiana

first_imgState judge’s ruling raises another hurdle for planned $9.4 billion Formosa Plastics plant in Louisiana FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Advocate:A state district judge sent critical air permits for a $9.4 billion Formosa Plastics complex back to state environmental regulators so they can take a closer look at the St. James Parish facility’s emissions impacts on Black residents living nearby.Nineteenth Judicial District Judge Trudy White issued the finding during a hearing Wednesday, telling the state Department of Environmental Quality to more properly evaluate the environmental justice questions surrounding the project, plaintiff’s attorneys said.White ruled two weeks after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced it would be suspending its wetlands permit for the facility along the Mississippi River to review its own analysis of alternative sites and failure to look at potential sites in neighboring Ascension Parish. Formosa officials said White’s ruling did not suspend the air permits in the interim, but her ruling does add another layer of uncertainty for a project that is expected to create 1,200 permanent jobs, tens of millions of dollars per year in state and local taxes, and millions more in spinoff benefits once built.Along with the Corps wetland permits and a local land use permit, the state air permits allow FG LA, the Formosa Plastics affiliate behind the project, to operate and help clear the path to significant construction investment. The Corps’ decision earlier this month had already halted major construction activities.Last year, a joint investigation by The Advocate, Times-Picayune and ProPublica using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency modeling data found Formosa and other new industrial proposals since 2015 posed an acute impact on predominantly poor and black river communities, though white communities hardly escape it either.Known as the Sunshine Project, the Formosa complex will produce the raw materials for a variety of plastics and has been permitted to emit more than 800 pounds of toxic pollutants, nearly 6,500 tons of criteria pollutants known to cause ground-level ozone and respiratory ailments, and more than 13.6 million tons of greenhouse gases annually, DEQ says.[David J. Mitchell]More: Judge delays crucial permit for Formosa plastics plant; requires deeper analysis of racial impactslast_img read more

Seven Natural Wonders of the South

first_imgScreen shot 2015-06-22 at 2.14.47 PMPhoto by Dion Hinchcliffe3. Seneca Rocks, West VirginiaThe Southern Appalachians may not be as rocky as their counterparts, the Rocky Mountains, but that doesn’t mean we have a shortage of cliffs and stone crags. From Rock City to Old Rag to the Potomac Gorge, we’ve got our share of stone. But the most impressive and unusual outcroppings in our region may just be Seneca Rocks in West Virginia. Seneca consists of a razorback ridge of sheer, vertical fins rising 900 feet from Seneca Creek. The rock is divided into two segments, North Peak and South Peak, divided by a notch. You can reach the top of North Peak via a steep, but accessible hike, but South Peak has the distinction of being the only peak east of the Mississippi that can only be summitted by technical rock climbing.Seneca Rocks loom high above the valley floor, acting as a focal point for the Spruce Knob-Seneca Rocks National Recreation Area.“There are other rock formations like this on the same ridge,” says Arthur Kearns, owner of Seneca Rocks Climbing School. “Nelson Rocks and Judy Rocks are similar, but Seneca is the highest concentration of this sort of cliff around. It’s a big uplift of sheer rock, and the quality of rock can’t be matched, which is why the climbing is so good.”It’s unknown who first scaled the rocks, though evidence of Native American villages has been found in the valley below the formation, so it’s likely that Seneca has been climbed for centuries. One of the first recorded ascents in the 1930s revealed an inscription at the top of the peak, that read “D.B. September 16, 1908.” Climbers started scaling the rocks for sport in the 40s and the U.S. Army used the area to train soldiers for the Italian campaign during World War II. Today, there are almost 400 mapped routes, ranging from 5.0 to 5.12. Seneca is known in the climbing world for its exposure. The climbing on these cliffs is very steep, with impeccable views at all grades. You can climb Seneca as a beginner and have 180 feet of air under your heels on a 5.2 route.See It For YourselfThe best way to experience the wonder of Seneca Rocks is to climb them. Kearns recommends Old Man’s, the most climbed route at Seneca. It’s a 5.3 that will take you to the summit in five pitches, and represents the easiest path to the South Peak.If you’re not up for sending the rocks, you’ll have to settle for hiking to North Peak via the popular Seneca Rocks Trail, which zigzags up the mountain for 1.5 miles starting at the Seneca Rocks Discovery Center.4. BLK 69, North CarolinaThanks to the pervasive logging in the Southeast, most of our ancient trees were axed over a century ago. Patches of old growth still exist in the Southern Appalachians, with stands of trees typically dating no more than 400 years old. Patches of old growth bald cypress in the swamps of our piedmont, on the other hand, are often twice as old.  The Okefenokee has 1,000-year-old bald cypress trees, while trees inside the Congaree National Park in South Carolina have been dated to 1,500 years ago. But if you want to find the oldest trees in the South, you’ve got to paddle the Black River near Wilmington, N.C. There, within the pockets of swamp along the Black, you’ll find stands of 1,700-year-old bald cypress, including BLK 69, the oldest dated tree east of the Rocky Mountains. After taking a core sample of the gnarled cypress, scientists estimate BLK 69 took root sometime around 364 A.D.“It’s hard to say why these bald cypress escaped logging,” says Hervey McIver, Onslow Bight project manager for the Nature Conservancy, which manages a 3,000-acre preserve on the Black River. “It could be because loggers like solid trees and so many bald cypress are hollow, we don’t know. But the bald cypress has a knack for surviving. These trees can lose a limb and produce another without much of a problem. The tree just hangs in there.”The Nature Conservancy’s Black River preserve has roughly 1,000 acres of the ancient trees, and more exist outside of the preserve’s boundaries. The gnarled, pretty trees have huge buttresses popping out of the black water. Many of the trees have lost their canopies because of the frequent storms, and some are hollow, but most are still alive and kicking. Finding BLK 69 will be tough. It’s located downstream of the preserve in a swamp called Larkin’s Cove, but it’s unmarked and tough to distinguish from its neighbors.See It For YourselfYour only chance of seeing the ancient trees is by paddling the unmarked Black River. The oldest trees can be found inside the Three Sisters Swamp and Larkin’s Cove farther downstream. To get there, you’ll need to paddle a 14-mile stretch between Beatty’s Bridge and the Route 3 Bridge outside of Atkinson. Three Sisters is located between Henry’s Landing road and the Hunt’s Bluff Wildlife ramp.5. Cranberry Glades Botanical Area, West Virginia The Cranberry Glades may not be an obvious wonder like Mammoth Cave, but dig into the details of this ecosystem, and you can’t help but be amazed. The federally designated botanical area consists of a cluster of high elevation bogs spanning 750 acres at 3,400 feet in elevation. It is the largest system of bogs in the Mountain State, packed with plants that normally grow in much higher and colder climates. It’s a high elevation swamp with plants that are typically found in the arctic tundra of Canada.“You see lots of plants you’re not going to find anywhere else in the region,” says Diana Stull, director of the Cranberry Mountain Nature Center. “Basically, you’re looking at an ecosystem that’s left over from the last ice age.”A ghostly white sphagnum moss covers much of the ground, while short cranberry shrubs dominate other sections of the area. All of the surface vegetation is underscored by 10 feet of decaying plants, or peat, that gives the entire forest a spongy consistency. More than 60 unique plant species can be found in and around the bogs, including snakemouth orchids, skunk cabbage (a big, green leafed plant that stinks), wild cranberries, and carnivorous plants like the purple pitcher and the tiny sundew. Carbon dating puts the peat bogs at 10,000 years old, a holdover from colder times. According to a study by West Virginia’s Department of Natural Resources, there are fewer than 20 of these high elevation cranberry bogs in the world.See It For YourselfVisitors aren’t allowed to walk on the spongy surface of the bogs, but the half-mile boardwalk trail will take you through the heart of the ecosystem, and the eight-mile Cowpasture Trail is a natural surface path that forms a loop around the entire botanical area. Picking the cranberries within the botanical area is forbidden, but go early in the morning and you might see black bears foraging the berries and skunk cabbage.6. Stone Mountain, GeorgiaToday, Stone Mountain is etched with the portrait of Robert E. Lee and his Confederate cohorts; there’s also a light show during the summer, a snow park during the winter, and a tram running to the top. But imagine what Stone Mountain would have felt like before it became a tourist destination. Picture this massive granite dome as the Creek Indians saw it: a sheer mountain of rock, rising almost a thousand feet from the piedmont, unlike any other mountain within hundreds of miles. Even with the kitschy tourist trappings, Stone Mountain still looms impressively over its surroundings.Rising 786 feet from the forest floor, Stone Mountain is one of the most unusual granite peaks in the Southeast. Unlike other rock domes in our region, Stone Mountain is almost completely devoid of a forest canopy. Its summit stands bare, a solid rock monolith. And what you see is just the beginning. According to geologists, the rock mountain extends for nine miles underground.Stone Mountain’s history is equally fascinating. At least 12 Archaic Indian sites have been found around the mountain. On the summit, the prehistoric Woodland Indians built a rock wall encircling the top of the mountain. Later, Creek Indians called the peak Lone Mountain and used it as a sacred meeting place. Settlers moving west used the mountain as a landmark in late 1700s. Anything west was considered Indian Territory. Creek Indians finally ceded the land to the state of Georgia in 1821. On Thanksgiving night in 1915, a group of Ku Klux Klan members burned a cross on top of the mountain that was visible from downtown Atlanta. Over the next 45 years, Klan members held meetings on the mountain, which became a symbol of the white supremacist group. In 1963, Martin Luther King put an end to that dark era of Stone Mountain by mentioning it in his I Have a Dream speech, saying, “Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.”See It For YourselfForget the tram, climb the 1.3-mile Walk Up trail from the base to the summit and soak in the views of Atlanta from the top. On a clear day, you can even see the string of Appalachian Mountains rising in the distance. You can also hike or run the five-mile loop around the mountain’s base.Screen shot 2015-06-22 at 3.00.18 PMPhoto by David Wilson7. Natural Bridge, VirginiaThe 20-story limestone arch is 100 feet wide and 200 feet tall, forming a bridge over Cedar Creek, a tributary of the James. The bridge has amazed visitors for centuries. In 1774, Thomas Jefferson bought the natural arch and its surrounding land for 20 shillings from King George III and quickly built a cabin for visitors. In the late 1800s, Natural Bridge was considered one of the natural wonders of the world, on par with Niagara Falls as a must-see site for international tourists.Like most natural arches, the bridge was formed over millions of years. The waters of Cedar Creek slowly eroding away at the softer layers of limestone beneath the bridge that remains today. The Monacan Indian explanation for the bridge is a bit more exciting, though: Once, while fleeing a rival tribe, the Monacan came to Cedar Creek and prayed for a safe route across the bluffs and torrential whitewater. When they stopped praying, the bridge appeared, spanning the length of the canyon. The Monacans called it the “Bridge of God,” and named the route over the bridge, the “Great Path.” Later, the bridge would become an important trade route for settlers, and eventually, the path for Highway 11.See It For YourselfAn easy trail leads to the bridge, while a wax museum portrays prominent figures from American history. A light show illuminates the bridge at night. Also, check out the caverns adjacent to the bridge. You can take a self-guided tour that drops 34 stories into the ground and explores massive rooms of stalactites. •HONORABLE MENTIONSFireflies and FlytrapsSynchronous FirefliesFireflies are common to every backyard in the South, but the Elkmont area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park has the only species of firefly in the country that blink in perfect synchronicity. In fact, Photinus carolinus in the Smokies are one of only two synchronous firefly species in the entire world. Flashing is part of the firefly’s mating ritual. Males fly around and flash, while females remain stationary and send out response flashes when they see a suitor they like. For the synchronous fireflies, their flashing is a chemical reaction in their bellies just like other species of fireflies, but scientists aren’t exactly sure why, or how, this particular species has managed to become synchronous. The leading theory suggests it’s the result of stiff competition: each fly can sense when its neighbor is going to flash, and simply tries to flash first. The synchronicity occurs in short bursts and ends abruptly in darkness. You’ll get six seconds of total darkness followed by several rapid flashes, then darkness again.See it for yourself at the Elkmont Campground. The height of synchronous activity in the Smokies is a two-week period in early to mid June. And it’s possible that within the foreseeable future, the Smokies species may be the only species of synchronous firefly left in the world. The other species of synchronous fireflies live in Southeast Asia, but their numbers are dwindling because of timber production and light pollution, which have affected their mating habits.The Venus FlytrapThis famous carnivorous plant may seem exotic, but the boggy areas in eastern North Carolina and South Carolina are the only places in the world where it is found. The plant finds its home in soil that lacks nutrients, then makes up for the dietary imbalance by eating insects. When unsuspecting insects trigger hairs inside the plant’s “mouth,” the flytrap closes, forming a stomach that secretes digestive juices. See it for yourself in the Green Swamp, a preserve managed by the Nature Conservancy, that houses the flytrap and 13 other species of carnivorous plant.SOUTHERN SUPERLATIVESOldest River in North AmericaNEW RIVER350 million years oldHighest Mountain east of the RockiesMOUNT MITCHELL6,684 feetDeepest Gorge east of the RockiesLINVILLE GORGE2,000 feet deepTallest Waterfall east of the RockiesWHITEWATER FALLS411 feetLongest RiverTENNESSEE RIVER886 miles long according to USGSLargest Wilderness area in the SoutheastOKEFENOKEE WILDERNESS354,000 acres You may not have the opportunity to see all of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World for yourself. A trip to see the Aurora Borealis with your own eyes may be out of your price range, and visiting Zimbabwe’s Victoria Falls in person might take longer than your one-week allotted vacation. Luckily, the South has its own suite of natural wonders—locations and phenomenon that will beguile even the most experienced adventure traveler. Some of the places that have made our list have been popular tourist destinations for more than a century, while others have only recently been discovered. They all are awe-inspiring in their own way.1. Whitewater Falls and the Blue Ridge Escarpment North CarolinaThere are waterfalls, and then there is Whitewater Falls, the tallest waterfall east of the Rocky Mountains. You’ll hear that label applied to a number of impressive waterfalls in our region, but measuring 411 feet from top to bottom, Whitewater Falls is the one and true king of falling water in this half of the country. Even better? Just downstream, the Whitewater River drops again in another dramatic plunge that measures 400 feet. Both Upper and Lower Whitewater Falls drop along a topographical phenomenon called the Blue Ridge Escarpment—a drastic and sudden 3,000-foot shift in elevation from flat piedmont to steep mountains that forms an abrupt “blue wall.”The Escarpment is blessed with more dramatic waterfalls than anywhere else in the East. That’s because the severe uplands also act as a rain maker: only the Pacific Northwest has more rainfall than the Escarpment. As a result, the region has as many rare species as Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and it is the center of the world’s salamander population. With ferns, mosses, fungi, wildflowers, and spray cliffs, the Escarpment is a veritable rain forest, and Upper and Lower Whitewater Falls are the tangible manifestations of this dramatic ecosystem.See It For YourselfWhitewater Falls Recreation Area has a paved trail to overlooks of Upper Whitewater Falls. Follow the Foothills Trail for a short hike to see Lower Whitewater Falls in South Carolina. Better yet, hike the entire 80-mile Foothills Trail, which traverses the most severe Escarpment section.2. Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky Mammoth is the world’s longest known cave system with 367 miles of explored underground rooms and passages. And there’s still plenty more to explore, with miles of “new” cave discovered every year.“We have a dedicated group of volunteers whose primary job is to explore and map the system,” says Vickie Carson, information officer for Mammoth Cave National Park, explaining that the cave runs beneath four above-ground ridges. “Our explorers drop into remote valleys and find new passages that eventually connect with the main system.”Some cavers estimate there are at least 600 miles of undiscovered cave still awaiting explorers underground. The terrain in Eastern Kentucky is perfect for caves. The soft limestone rock beneath the surface is tipped slightly toward the Green River, and underground streams and rainwater cut away at the limestone over years, slowly creating the passages we now know as Mammoth Cave. And Mammoth contains everything you’d want in a cave: claustrophobic passages leading to spacious cathedrals, underground rivers with blind fish, stalagmites, and stalagtites.See It For YourselfFor the general public, the only way into the cave is through a tour guided by the National Park Service. Check out the Wild Cave Tour for the most in-depth experience. You’ll get six hours underground, crawl through nine-inch-wide tunnels, see underground waterfalls, and drop 300 feet below the surface as you travel through 5.5 miles of cave.last_img read more

Lack of urgency could doom the future development of an ‘intelligent bank’

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The status quo in retail banking is tottering. It’s under siege from new technologies, new consumer expectations, new competitors and new regulations. This has forced banks and credit unions to modify their business models, re-prioritize investments, change products and services offered and ramp up innovation efforts. There has also been a rethinking of distribution options, with digital channels significantly increasing in importance.These shifts are reflected in the sixth iteration of a study of the future of retail banking conducted by The Economist Intelligence Unit, on behalf of Temenos. Until this year, the changes in consumer behavior were believed to be the primary impetus for changes in retail banking strategies. For the first time, the key driver for change is considered to be new technologies, such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, blockchain, the Internet of Things and other technologies underpinned by data and advanced analytics. And the forecast from those surveyed is that the importance of new technologies will only get greater in the future (2020 to 2025). This is reinforced by the importance of regulations on data technology – which is also projected to increase in the longer view. continue reading »last_img read more

Cuomo declares emergency as NY’s coronavirus cases reach 76

first_imgThe outbreak there has been traced to a synagogue in New Rochelle where the congregation was asked to self-quarantine earlier in the week after a person in its community was hospitalized with the illness. NEW YORK (AP) — Governor Andrew Cuomo says that New York state’s coronavirus caseload has risen over the past day from 44 to 76. At a news conference, Cuomo said the largest concentration of cases, 57, is in Westchester County. That prompted him to declare a state of emergency on Saturday to bolster the medical response to the outbreak. No one has died from the new virus in the state.last_img