Alumnae panelists discuss being women of color in college and beyond

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Department of Psychological Studies, the Black Student Union, Providing Options and the Career Crossings Office teamed up to present an alumnae panel to students Wednesday evening to address questions about how alumna of color use their Saint Mary’s education and make an impact on their communities after graduation.The panel included Romona Bethany ’04, JAG specialist at Washington High School, Leila Ellis ’15, a program manager at Notre Dame, Ashley Harrison ’07, director of finance at the Logan Center, Kimmi Troy ’00, co-owner of TSB Fitness Studio and Deanna Ward ’01, school counselor at Discovery Middle School. The panel was hosted by senior psychology major Acacia Malone.The panel began with each person describing their own experience at the College. Ellis said Saint Mary’s wasn’t initially where she most wanted to attend college.“My first choice was actually the University of Michigan,” Ellis said. “I actually didn’t find out that I was accepted there until after I had started [at Saint Mary’s], but I don’t regret anything. I got the best of both worlds here, with Notre Dame right across the street.” Ellis said it took some time for her to grow into her role on campus.“Use your resources and don’t be afraid to make connections,” Ellis said. “I was an extremely shy student and it was a little challenging starting off. I only managed to branch out once I went to Notre Dame. I found a home there and in making those connections I was able to bring those skills back to Saint Mary’s. It was my junior year where I felt I really prospered.”Much of Ellis’ success can be credited to the relationships she formed with employees of the College, she said.“Meeting the faculty and administrators really helped me to figure out what my niche was,” she said. “I’m finally on the right track and I owe that to Saint Mary’s.”Harrison said Saint Mary’s helps instill a confidence vital to professional success. “Saint Mary’s gave me confidence to tackle the things that I wouldn’t want to do,” Harrison said. “The school does a great job of instilling the values and virtues that I needed to succeed. My professors had a lot of confidence in me that I didn’t even have in myself. It’s not the classes or the subjects that help you succeed, it’s that feeling of empowerment.”Troy also said students should be open to new experiences and go to events. “You never know what’s going to come out of that event that you went to, but maybe didn’t want to,” she said. Of course, college is difficult, but Troy said she came to appreciate her time at Saint Mary’s after her graduation.“The love grows once you’re out,” she said. “I’m originally from Detroit and it was a difficult transition to make. I was suddenly in a small community with people who had never interacted with African-American women before or only knew what they had learned on TV. … Once you graduate that lack of knowledge or racial bias does not change. It morphs into something different. Those experiences helped shape me.” Troy also said there are many ways for African-American students to feel more welcome in the Saint Mary’s community. “For me it was the extremely present history of the college,” Troys said. “There are historical images, buildings and the stories of the founders and Sister Madeleva that are everywhere. Once I believed that I was a part of that, that this is my school too it sort of became an instant sisterhood.” Women of color should feel empowered to become more involved in the Saint Mary’s community, Harrison said. “It’s all about the mindset,” she said. “You really need to believe that this is where I am, I’m not going to leave. Get involved — recognize that it might be intimidating, but embrace what you have. You only have four years, make the most of it.”Offering some of her own advice, Ellis said students should be bold in building relationships.“Use your resources,” she said. “They could be anything, not just professors or faculty members, they could be your friends or upperclasswomen. Don’t be afraid to jump in, don’t be afraid to reach out or to keep in touch.” Ellis also said she encourages students to work to overcome the mental setbacks they may face. “If you let that voice in your head that says you can’t do it stop you, you’re always going to be stuck at point A. Don’t let it,” she said. Harrison said it is important for students of color to move past their feelings of fear in order to embrace the Saint Mary’s community. “Once you get over that feeling, know that it is a family,” she said. “Regardless of race, regardless of ethnicity, we are a sisterhood.” The panel went on to discuss the importance of an education in breaking down prejudices.“There are a lot of stereotypes about me,” Harrison said. “But I have an awesome education and once I open my mouth I knock those stereotypes down and that’s what will help you succeed.”The panel then received questions from the audience. In response to a question about how Saint Mary’s could become more inclusive to women of color and attract more African-American students, Troy said the alumnae of the College need to stay in touch.“I think there needs to be more of a commitment to alumnae staying connected,” Troy said. “We need the school to facilitate the connection. … I don’t think you need outside firms, have women of color go to high schools around the country, even if just for an hour.” Ellis said her own experiences with Saint Mary’s recruiting reveal some of the problems of their current recruitment strategy.“When I was in high school and the Saint Mary’s representative came, it was honestly kind of off putting to have a Caucasian woman talking about diversity,” she said. “It made me wonder if she really knew what it was like to deal with issues of diversity and inclusion.”Faculty members at the College should emphasize being open to working with minority students, Ellis said.“Professors need to put that foot forward,” she said. “You don’t always get the warm and fuzzy feeling from teachers. In a lot of cases students will not share their stories unless they really feel comfortable.” Tags: alumnae panel, College Recruitment, Diversity, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

Mancini plays down Tevez punishment

first_img The Argentinian striker was this week ordered to undertake 250 hours of unpaid community work after being found guilty of driving while disqualified. The punishment comes at a time when Tevez has been in fine form on the field having scored six goals in his last seven appearances. With City facing Manchester United in an eagerly-anticipated derby at Old Trafford on Monday, Mancini is hopeful that run continues. When asked if the community service was likely to cause a problem for City, Mancini said: “I don’t think so, no. I didn’t speak with him about this.” He added: “I think that Carlos made a mistake and he will pay for this. But usually he has good behaviour.” Another City player, Samir Nasri, has also been banned from driving this week. Mancini does not think these incidents badly affect the image of the club. He said: “I don’t think this. This is their private life. We can do nothing about this. This can happen sometimes.” Manchester City boss Roberto Mancini does not expect Carlos Tevez’s community service order to hamper the club in any way.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Slusher, Chan look back on year in office

first_imgThough hours at the University Park Health Center and Lyon Center remain the same and students still can’t use paper tickets to get into football games, outgoing Undergraduate Student Government President Holden Slusher and Vice President Ashlie Chan say they are satisfied with their accomplishments, which include starting a free tram to L.A. Live and improving communication with students.When they ran for office last spring, Slusher and Chan had a number of ideas they hoped would improve student life at USC. Slusher said he feels his administration managed to complete a majority of those tasks, and the rest he hopes will be continued by the next administration.“I’m really happy with everything that we’ve accomplished,” Slusher said. “We worked on everything on our platform and those that were not finished were passed off. I’m really proud of everyone we worked with.”The highlights of Slusher’s administration include getting a USC tram to run between the school and L.A. Live and improving USG’s visibility among students. The tram, which began running in November, offers students free transportation to the popular Downtown destination and has been utilized by many students since its inception.To improve USG’s visibility, Slusher and Chan conducted a number of student surveys, tabled on Trousdale Parkway and hosted the Council of Presidents, a meeting that gave student leaders a chance to ask USG questions.Several of Slusher and Chan’s platform points, however, did not come to fruition.Initially, Slusher and Chan had hoped to expand the hours of the health center and the Lyon Center, but the university lacked the resources to hire more staff and told USG the plan wasn’t feasible.“It’s not financially viable,” Helen Moser, USG director of campus affairs, said. “If we were to extend the hours, then it would take away from necessary things that students need … Compared to other schools, our hours of the health center is one of the best in the country.”Chan noted, however, that USG has set up meetings between students and administrators to discuss a three-year plan that might involve extending the Lyon Center’s hours.Other tasks USG had a tough time accomplishing were getting USCards accepted at local businesses, creating a paper ticket option for sporting events and adding more computers to USC’s libraries.Chan said that in many cases USG hit administrative or bureaucratic roadblocks in trying to create significant changes around campus.She did note, however, that the next administration will continue working to create a paper ticket option.Another task the new administration will have the chance to finish is increasing library security, including adding turnstiles to the entrance of Leavey.“The libraries were a little bit slow on that,” Chan said. “We will see more turnstiles and safety precautions taken by next year.”Slusher and Chan had also hoped to repave The Row. Greek Senators Hayden Coplen, Dylan Dan and Max Ukropina were heading this issue but found some major roadblocks as they researched the project.“Until The Row shuts down, we can’t repave it because it’s just going to get worse and worse and worse,” Chan said. “By the time we have a repaved street, it’s just going to go back to the same status as it was before. We can’t repave a lot of the streets until we find solutions to making The Row safer … We would not be able to do anything unless we appealed to the L.A. city, which makes it more of a challenge to get accomplished.”Altogether, USG under Slusher and Chan spent approximately $1.72 million from their $1.8 million budget. Treasurer Ashwin Appiah noted that they saved a lot of money during elections, and whenever they considered spending money, they made sure that it would go back to the student body.“We didn’t want to spend money just because we had it,” Appiah said. “We think before we spend and we see if it goes back to the student body, and if it doesn’t, then we double-think about what we’re using the money for.”Although Slusher and Chan did not accomplish all the items on their platform, Chan said she does not consider them failures because changing circumstances might provide opportunities to complete those items.“We had really lofty goals because if everyone keeps saying ‘no,’ then no change is going to get done,” Chan said. “If we found a compromise then it’s a success in itself.”Chan said the only regret she has is not starting certain projects sooner.“Hindsight is 20/20,” Chan said. “There are only so many things that we can do at one time, so, if anything, maybe we should have done some of these things faster or sooner, but there was really no way we could have measured that.”Chan said she and Slusher are pleased with what they accomplished.“I think it was very smart for us to anticipate that our goals were lofty but feasible,” Chan said. “The ultimate goal was to accomplish everything, and I think we tried our best.”last_img read more

Tabcorp donates funds and volunteer support to Australia’s bushfire crisis

first_img Tabcorp expects $1bn hit as ‘COVID and retail contractions’ take effect August 3, 2020 StumbleUpon Related Articles Submit Tabcorp Holdings has confirmed that it will donate AUS $1.5 million to Australian emergency services battling the bushfire crisis which has engulfed the entire Gold Coast of Sydney.The ASX listed operator has confirmed that all lottery proceeds taken from its Saturday Lotto draw scheduled for 25 January will be donated to Australia’s ‘Bushfire Relief’.Seeking to generate as much funding as possible for emergency services fighting Australia’s biggest environmental catastrophe, Tabcorp has informed its retail network and marketing partners to refer to the event as the ‘Bushfire Benefit Draw’.“We offer our deepest sympathies to the many Australians that have lost loved ones, homes or their livelihood during this national crisis,” said Tabcorp CEO David Attenborough.“The Australian spirit has been truly inspirational throughout this ordeal and the Tabcorp Group is pleased to play its part in supporting the recovery effort.”Tabcorp further informs that it has provided financial relief to hotels and clubs that have been directly impacted by the bushfires, with its Keno brands contributing AUS $100,000 to relief operations assisting affected communities.Internally, Tabcorp governance has moved to expand the firm’s existing HR policies by providing open-ended paid leave for volunteers and reservists helping Australia’s emergency services counter bushfire impacts.“Many of our own people have been deeply impacted by these bushfires,” added Attenborough. “We have partners in pubs, clubs, newsagents and retail outlets across New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland and South Australia that have been devastated and we’re committed to providing as much support as we can during this difficult time.” Flutter moves to refine merger benefits against 2020 trading realities August 27, 2020 Share Tabcorp double burdened by covid and group impairment charges August 19, 2020 Sharelast_img read more

Trump Promises Stone No Prison Time: “He Can Sleep Well at Night!”

first_imgPresident Trump on Thursday promised that his longtime informal political adviser, Roger Stone, will not serve prison time.The commander-in-chief said the convicted Republican provocateur “can sleep well at night” while revisiting criticisms of former special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe.The pledge from the president came on Twitter, after Charlie Kirk, the founder of the conservative group Turning Point USA, wrote Tuesday that Stone “will serve more time in prison than 99% of these rioters destroying America,” in reference to the ongoing protests over the killing of George Floyd.“This isn’t justice,” Kirk added. “RT for a full pardon of Roger Stone!”Never forget:Roger Stone will serve more time in prison than 99% of these rioters destroying AmericaAll because he supports Donald Trump.This isn’t justice.RT for a full pardon of Roger Stone!— Charlie Kirk (@charliekirk11) June 2, 2020 Trump shared the tweet and added, “No. Roger was a victim of a corrupt and illegal Witch Hunt, one which will go down as the greatest political crime in history. He can sleep well at night!”The president’s social media post represents just his latest involvement in Stone’s case. It also comes after congressional Democrats and Justice Department officials called out the president and Attorney General William Barr for involving themselves in the matter.No. Roger was a victim of a corrupt and illegal Witch Hunt, one which will go down as the greatest political crime in history. He can sleep well at night! https://t.co/HHg24tcZrx— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 4, 2020 Federal prosecutors requested last February that Stone be sent to prison for seven to nine years for interfering with congressional and FBI investigations into alleged connections between the Russian government and Trump’s 2016 campaign.After the president blasted the prosecutors’ sentencing recommendation in a tweet as a “horrible and very unfair situation,” the Justice Department then submitted a revised filing that did not specify a prosecution term, and said the initial proposal “could be considered excessive and unwarranted.”This is a horrible and very unfair situation. The real crimes were on the other side, as nothing happens to them. Cannot allow this miscarriage of justice! https://t.co/rHPfYX6Vbv— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 11, 2020center_img Soon thereafter, the four attorneys who led Stone’s prosecution resigned or notified the court that they were stepping off the case.Last month, nearly 2,000 former Justice Department officials signed a letter urging Barr to resign over his actions in the federal cases of both Stone and Michael Flynn, Trump’s former national security adviser who was also tangled up in Mueller’s probe.The Justice Department has already started to move to stop the case against Flynn. However, it is unclear how Barr will respond to the president’s tweet from Thursday.During a February interview, Barr described the Stone case as a “righteous prosecution” and said, “I was happy that he was convicted.”Other convicted associates of the president who were targets of the investigation into Russian interference, including former Trump attorney Michael Cohen and former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, were recently released from prison into home confinement, due to concerns about the coronavirus.President Trump hinted earlier in the year that the self-proclaimed “dirty trickster” of GOP politics would not have to serve his full prison term, saying his former aide “has a very good chance of exoneration.”Stone said in April that he is “praying for a pardon,” and had been told by the Bureau of Prisons to report to begin serving his 40-month sentence by June 30.His appeal is still pending.last_img read more