Upset wins, 4th-quarter drives highlight McNabb’s SU career

first_img3.  Taming the Tigers After throwing for 8,581 passing yards and 78 touchdowns, as well as rushing for 1,633 yards and 19 touchdowns in four seasons, McNabb jumped to the top of the 1999 NFL Draft board. On April 17, 1999, McNabb was selected second overall by the Philadelphia Eagles, the highest drafted SU player since Ernie Davis was selected first overall in 1962. The only player drafted higher than McNabb was Kentucky quarterback Tim Couch. Facebook Twitter Google+ McNabb got the ball on the Orangemen’s 17-yard line. Down 26-22 to Virginia Tech with the Carrier Dome crowd pleading for something to pull the Orange out of the late-game hole, McNabb had four minutes and 42 seconds to march 83 yards for a game-winning score. McNabb and the rest of the SU offense did just that. A 14-play drive was capped with a 13-yard touchdown pass to tight end Steve Brominski as time expired. On third-and-goal, McNabb scrambled in the backfield and threw a lob pass to Brominski off his back foot, who rose above and snagged the ball out of the air. As a freshman, McNabb grabbed headlines on Oct. 21, 1995, when he threw the longest touchdown pass in Syracuse history. In a 22-0 win over West Virginia in the Carrier Dome, the freshman signal-caller found future All-Pro wide receiver Marvin Harrison for a 96-yard score. Two years later, he almost surpassed himself with a 94-yard pass to Quinton Spotwood in a win over East Carolina. On New Year’s Day 1996, McNabb helped the Orangemen make Gator Bowl history. After an 8-3 season, Syracuse was slated to play against then-No. 23 Clemson in the Gator Bowl in Jacksonville, Fla. Syracuse jumped out to an early 20-0 lead and ultimately won the game 41-0, the largest margin of victory in Gator Bowl history. McNabb earned MVP honors, throwing for 309 yards with three touchdowns while running for an additional score. McNabb’s day was highlighted by two long passing touchdowns to Harrison, one for 38 yards and the other for 56. 5. Coming off the bench 2.  The final draft center_img 1.  Fade for the win — Compiled by Jesse Dougherty, asst. copy editor, [email protected] 4.  The longest yardAdvertisementThis is placeholder text McNabb will go down in Syracuse folklore as No. 5, but he donned a different number on the basketball court. As a walk-on with the basketball team in the 1995-96 and 1996-97 seasons, McNabb came off the bench wearing No. 24. His crowning moment came against the Hoyas in 1997, when he played a career-high 19 minutes and finished with 10 points while shooting 4-of-5 from the field and 2-of-2 from the line. The Orangemen were short-handed due to foul trouble, and Jim Boeheim turned to McNabb in the 77-74 Syracuse victory. Published on November 1, 2013 at 3:25 am Commentslast_img read more

USC faculty members selected for Sloan Foundation grant

first_imgThe Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has selected four USC faculty members, Christoph Haselwandter, Dion Dickman, Jernej Barbič and Jennifer Garrison, to serve as research fellows for 2014.These four people are among the 126 researchers from the United States and Canada who were selected to the fellowships, which will provide them with a two-year, $50,000 fellowship award.More than 700 people are nominated each year for the Sloan fellowships, and the committee looks for people who have shown the potential to be forerunners in the scientific community through their accomplishments. 42 prior fellows have won the Nobel Prize, while 63 have received the National Medal of Science.Haselwandter, of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences, works as an assistant professor of astronomy and physics. He is currently doing research on cell membranes and their channels, but he is also training in theoretical physics, utilizing new scientific advances to better understand the physical principles that allow for the proliferation of living cells.Dickman, also of the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts, and Sciences, is a neuroscientist who is studying the development of synapses. He plans on using his fellowship to develop new ways to see synaptic activity and plasticity.Barbič, of the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, works as an assistant professor of computer science, and was previously names one of the “35 Innovators Under 35” by the MIT Technology Review. His current research studies animation, sound, haptics and computer graphics.Garrison, of the USC Davis School of Gerontology, as well as the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, is conducting research on neuropeptides, molecules that neurons use to send messages to each other. She wants to study use the grant to specifically look at the effect that neuropeptides have on aging.last_img read more

Wimbledon 2019: Cori Gauff dominates Magdalena Rybarikova to advance

first_imgThe journey continues…15-year-old @CocoGauff beats former #Wimbledon semi-finalist Magdalena Rybarikova in straight sets to book her place in the third round pic.twitter.com/60juztgXej— Wimbledon (@Wimbledon) July 3, 2019The pair had a long wait before finally taking the court at 8 p.m. local time, with their match moved under the roof on Court No. 1, but Gauff came out looking sharp in the first set. She broke Rybarikova at love to go up 4-2, then consolidated it in a service game that saw her run down seemingly everything the 30-year-old threw at her. Two games later, a Gauff service winner secured the first set. Gauff built on that momentum with an early break in the second, taking a 2-1 lead when a Rybarikova forehand on double break point went long. She continued to hammer away, never facing break point on her own serve, before Rybarikova put a backhand into the net on match point to end it — the veteran’s 23rd unforced error of the match to just 10 by Gauff.  The loss represented another disappointing stint at the All England Club for Rybarikova, who first played in the main draw at Wimbledon in 2008, when Gauff was 4 years old. Aside from her run to the semifinals in 2017, she had lost in the first round nine times and the third round once before exiting in the second round Wednesday. Gauff moves on to face Polona Hercog, who upset 17th-seeded Madison Keys in straight sets Wednesday, in the third round. Cori Gauff wasn’t about to let a dream win over Venus Williams be the end of her Wimbledon story. The 15-year-old American followed up that star-making upset by blowing past another player twice her age, defeating Magdalena Rybarikova 6-3, 6-3 Wednesday to advance to the third round.  Wimbledon 2019: Andy Murray relishes Serena Williams doubles pairingcenter_img Wimbledon 2019: American Reilly Opelka upsets Stan Wawrinka Gauff looked the more confident player from the first serve, leaving her Slovakian opponent to watch helplessly as she ran down drop shots and ripped winner after winner down the lines, both forehand and backhand. The teenager didn’t appear overawed by the big stage at any point, never expressing anything beyond the occasional straight-faced fist pump before she closed out Rybarikova with her third service break of a match that lasted just one hour, nine minutes.   Related Newslast_img read more