Saint Mary’s to host National History Day competiton

first_imgEvery year across the country, students channel their passion for the past through National History Day (NHD), a competition where students present projects through various media.Saint Mary’s is one such site hosting a regional NHD contest on Saturday, where students and professors will judge history projects made by local students ranging from grade to high school.Chair of the history department Bill Svelmoe said the College annually hosts this event.“Saint Mary’s has been hosting this one for many years now,” he said.The local students will present their projects mainly in Spes Unica Hall, where the history department is located.“[The projects] range from posters to papers to theatrical presentations,” history professor David Stefancic said. “And this year I have the pleasure of judging websites.”The competition organizes new themes every year. According to the National History Day website, this year’s theme is “taking a stand in history.”“The topics that I’m looking at are activism: … abolitionists, [the] Declaration of Independence, [the] Civil Rights movement in the ’50s, a young soldier from the Civil War, censorship [and] Tiananmen Square in China,” Stefancic said. “They have to do with social change and revolution.”While many history majors participate, students with any major can volunteer to judge the projects, Svelmoe said.“It’s not just [history] majors and it’s not like you have to really know what’s going on in history,” he said. “Remember, these are often little kids and, as a judge, you can request the age group [to judge].”Junior history and English literature major Brooke Lamb said it is a good opportunity for all Saint Mary’s students. Lamb said judging focuses more on the interview process and understanding what the students have put into their projects.“I think that anyone on campus could judge and [the history department is] willing to have volunteers,” Lamb said.The judges work in groups to examine and compare presentations.“You don’t judge anything by yourself — there’s usually three of you, at least, that are working together,” Svelmoe said. “It’s not all on you to crush some child’s dreams.”Judges score the students on their visuals and presentation and give feedback on the projects.“At the end of the day, you get together and you rank the presentations,” Svelmoe said. “The top ones advance [but] you try to say something encouraging about all of them.”Stefanic said student judging is a good way to see what young students are doing at lower levels.“You have a chance to see what’s going on there, particularly if you’re considering going onto teaching in grade school or junior high,” Stefancic said. “Also, you have a chance to meet some really cool kids.”The day also introduces local students to the College and Stefancic said the competition is a hidden recruiting tool for the students participating.“There have been instances where the students who were taking part of this met us and then decided to come to Saint Mary’s,” he said.Tags: Bill Svelmoe, David Stefanic, National History Day, SMC history departmentlast_img read more

Edin Džeko’s 100 City games

first_imgCity’s Bosnian striker Edin Džeko made his 100th appearance for the club at Saturday’s 5-0 FA Cup Quarter Final victory over Barnsley.In 100 games he played for 5644 minutes and he scored 38 goals with 148 minutes per goal.Džeko had 108 shots on target with 49.8% shooting accuracy. He also had 100 created chances.Džeko was born in 1986 in Sarajevo, he played for Željezničar, Teplice and came to Manchester City in 2011 from VfL Wolsburg.last_img

Kentucky School Surprises Student with Yearbook Photo of Her Service Dog

first_img“It’s important for us to do all we can to foster our relationship with families and do what we can to support students,” says Nathan Sturtzel, principal of St. Patrick Catholic School. “We love Ariel. She’s part of Hadley Jo’s family so she’s a part of our family too. Finding a place for her in our yearbook was an easy decision and it was a lot of fun to include her. We loved it.”The Labradoodle is the only service dog within the archdiocese of Louisville, according to Heather Lange.“When I got the yearbook and saw that they included our service dog, that was one of the most touching moments of my life. The inclusiveness meant so much,” she adds. “It proved that we may not all look the same, we may not all learn the same, we have differences but it’s OK. We can still be kind and inclusive and accept each other. This yearbook is a huge reflection of that.”She went on to say, “It’s very comforting knowing my daughter has a home at her school where she is loved and accepted, even though she may not look like everyone else. St. Patrick made a choice to accept my child and her service dog. The acceptance and inclusion is a true sign of kindness and compassion.” Photo courtesy: Heather Lange via CNN With the academic year coming to an end, one school in Kentucky decided to save a spot in its yearbook for a different kind of student – Ariel, a service dog.St. Patrick Catholic School in Louisville surprised the pet’s owner, 7-year-old Hadley Jo Lange, by including a photo of the Labradoodle among its kindergarten class. The girl suffers from epilepsy, which is a neurological disorder that causes seizures.“This dog has really saved my daughter’s life,” her mom, Heather Lange, told CNN. “I don’t know how I could ever thank Ariel as a mother. She goes with her everywhere, to school, rides the bus with her, goes to her dance classes and soccer practice. She always has her eyes on my little girl. It’s a huge sense of security.”The 4-year-old pooch can recognize when the child is having an episode. When the seizures happen at school, Ariel alerts teachers by barking. During the episodes, she also lies down next to Hadley Jo and moves her body underneath the child in order to cushion her fall.last_img read more

Fabulous Five! Penn Hills girls capture state championship

first_imgSTATE CHAMPS—The Penn Hills girls 400-meter relay team (shown after winning the Baldwin Invitational) from left: Deshaun Squires, Christina Roberson, Paige Fields and Iman Wilkerson, won the PIAA AAA 400-meter relay with a time of 47.37. These four girls and teammate Jordan Lee racked up 48 points to win the PIAA Girls AAA team championship at Shippensburg University, May 29. Wilkerson finished third in the 100-meter dash and second in the 200-meter dash. Wilkerson, Squires, Roberson and Lee won the 1600-meter relay and set a new state record with a time of 3:46.31. Penn Hills becomes the first team from the WPIAL to win the team title in AAA.last_img