Wes Moore redefines ‘higher education’ for TCU students

first_imgTwitter Students debut performances of drag personas as part of unique new course Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/ ReddIt Emily Laff is a senior journalism major (and die-hard Broncos fan) from Denver, Colorado. When she is not out reporting she is most likely at a Krispy Kreme drive-through or in an aisle at Barnes & Noble. White supremacy posters on TCU’s campus under investigation Emily Laff Condensed semester, lost week to snowstorm adding to some students stress during finals week printAs a student at Johns Hopkins University, author Wes Moore said he was bombarded with questions about his major.“I started thinking it was the most important question I would ever be asked – until I realized it wasn’t,” said Moore, who spoke Wednesday to a standing room only audience in the ballroom of the Brown-Lupton University Union.Moore wrote “The Other Wes Moore,” this year’s common reading book for incoming first-year students. He told students and faculty there is a far more important question to be answered.“The most important question you’re going to be asked is ‘who will you fight for?’” Moore said. “Higher education has nothing to do with the degrees on your wall… higher education is about identifying and finding that way, that reason, that person, who is benefited from you sitting here.”Moore’s challenge to students to rethink their idea of “higher education” was met with a standing ovation.Moore’s book was “an instant favorite among faculty and staff,” said Laura Shaw, operations coordinator of student development services.“He’s a very engaging and powerful speaker — almost motivational,” she said.“The Other Wes Moore” was meant to bring first-year students together through a shared experience.“I loved the book, especially the differences between the two Wes Moore’s,” said Elise Schraer, first-year pre-business major. “I wanted to hear what he had to say first-hand.”John Figg, a first-year Chancellor’s Scholar studying biochemistry, said he came to hear words of wisdom from Moore.“The story fascinated me and inspired me and I wanted to hear him speak,” Figg said. “I’m just hoping for some life lessons and mantras to live by.”Moore began his address by telling the audience he hoped they had come to understand the stories embedded in “The Other Wes Moore.”“These stories are not just about these two kids, it’s not about one name…these stories are about all of us,” Moore said. “These stories are about the decisions we make in our lives, and how each and every one of our actions has consequences and implications not just for us, they have consequences and implications for all of us. ”Students and faculty filled the Brown-University Union Ballroom to hear Wes Moore speak.Kathy Cavins-Tull , vice chancellor for student affairs, said Moore’s speech was more than just words of wisdom.“I feel like it’s a call to action from him that our education and our opportunities here have to be greater than for us, it has to contribute to our community,” Cavins-Tull said. “This is the time for us to learn to change the world, you have to do something with that and make it a better place – I thought his speech was great.”Senior religion major Mitchell Simmons, who is from Baltimore, where the book is based, said Moore’s words left him with a strong desire to make an impact.“Everything I’m doing now is not just for nothing, it’s for a purpose and that purpose is to help someone else and fight for someone else who is not like me and doesn’t have this opportunity,” Simmons said.Simmons said his way of fighting for others the way Moore discussed would be through working as a pastor.“That’s the one place where I can have influence in so many areas, through ministry.” Simmons said.TCU’s Student Government Association declared Oct. 28 Wes Moore Day at TCU.“We thought it would be a good way to show appreciation for him,”  said Julia Zellers, a sophomore political science and economics double major.  Zellers presented Moore with a framed copy of the resolution.Following Moore’s speech a select group, some of whom were Chancellor’s Scholars and common reading facilitators, joined Moore for a dinner reception in The Dee J. Kelly Alumni Center.Students and faculty had dinner with Wes Moore in the Dee J. Kelly Alumni and Visitors Center.“It was just an opportunity to have students here engage more in the conversation and have the opportunity to ask questions, for many students it will give them a more vested experience in today,” said Kay Higgins, associate dean of student development services.“It was more superlative than wonderful, where do you go from there?” Higgins said. “I think it could be left as a challenge for everyone in the room to benefit the rest of the world.”Moore also addressed his hometown of Baltimore in the midst of the upcoming trial of the officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray.“People ask what’s going to happen to Baltimore, but actually my greater fear is what happens in Baltimore if the only thing we are doing is standing around and waiting for a conviction,” Moore said.Moore said instead of placing the responsibility and blame on others, it is our responsibility as citizens in society to recognize injustice and do something about it.“When people say people are products of their environments, it’s often because we decide we are going to wash our hands of responsibility” Moore said.In his conclusion, Moore shared with the students and faculty a story about Col. Murphy, whom he had met and admired during his time at Valley Forge Military Academy and College.“When it’s time for you to leave here, when it’s time for you to leave this school, or when it’s time for you to leave this planet, make sure it mattered that you were ever even here because none of us are promised anything,” Murphy, who had cancer, said in his farewell address.“For the time that we are here,” Moore said. “Let’s do something with it, for the time we have here, lets fight for all those others in all of our lives, how will your higher education matter to them?”Moore listened to every student and staff member that stood in line to speak with him. He also stayed to sign books and take pictures.Wes Moore spoke with LaDonna Thompkins, one of many that waited in line to meet him. He stayed to sign books, take photographs and speak with every student and staff member who waited. Wes Moore, the author of TCU’s latest common reading, spoke to a packed audience in the BLUU Ballroom Wednesday, Oct. 28. (Photo by Emily Laff.) Linkedin Facebook TCU parking: No room on the asphalt TCU tells Greeks: No Hazing + posts Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/ Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/ Twitter Facebook Linkedin Previous articleNew registrar looks to improve technology and keep a personal touchNext articleTCU Purple Haze is gearing up for basketball season Emily Laff RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR ReddIt Students react to controversial speaker’s views on radical Islam The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years Emily Laffhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/emily-laff/last_img read more

Mortgage Delinquencies are Down; Debt is Up

first_img Mortgage Debt Mortgage Delinquencies TransUnion 2016-02-17 Brian Honea Subscribe in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago February 17, 2016 1,253 Views Previous: Fannie Mae Downgrades Economic Forecast, Citing Lackluster Growth Next: Investors, Take Note: Single-Family Rental Market’s Popularity is Still Surging About Author: Brian Honea Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. Related Articles Home / Daily Dose / Mortgage Delinquencies are Down; Debt is Upcenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: Mortgage Debt Mortgage Delinquencies TransUnion  Print This Post Mortgage Delinquencies are Down; Debt is Up The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago While the share of residential mortgages that are seriously delinquent (60 days or more overdue) took a substantial drop to close out 2015, the average level of mortgage debt per borrower rose to its highest level post-recession, according to TransUnion’s Q4 2015 Industry Insights Report released Wednesday.The delinquencies fell by nearly a full percentage point over-the-year in the fourth quarter of 2015, from 3.29 percent down to 2.37 percent, according to TransUnion. The 28 percent decline is double the amount of decline the delinquency rate experienced from Q4 2013 to Q4 2014, and it is the largest percentage of decline since 2010 when the delinquency rate began to recover.“Overall, the consumer credit markets are performing well,” said Joe Mellman, VP and mortgage business leader for TransUnion. “It is a positive sign that delinquency levels have remained relatively low despite more borrowers receiving credit. We have seen a continued rise in the proportion of non-prime borrowers in both the auto loan and credit card industries, and that is a likely driver for the uptick in delinquency among recently originated cohorts in those sectors. We also believe lower energy prices and the resulting job losses in energy-dependent markets have played some role in delinquency rates. Even so, that impact appears at this point to be localized, and mild in terms of national effect.”Meanwhile, the average amount of mortgage debt per borrower climbed by 1.4 percent over-the-year in Q4, from $187,139 to $189,707—the highest level of debt per borrower since the crisis. The number of originations (viewed one quarter in arrears) spiked by 21 percent over-the-year in Q3 2015 while all risk tiers fell within 2 percentage points of the annual growth rate.“For the first time since the ‘refi’ boom, we believe some origination activity may be attributed to ‘last chance’ refinancing to lock in a low rate before the widely-anticipated Fed Funds Rate increase in December,” Mellman said. “This sustained high level of activity is an indicator of a broadly recovering housing market.”The fact that delinquency levels have risen by a relatively small amount as more consumers (particularly subprime borrowers) have gained access to credit products, including credit cards and auto loans, indicates that consumer credit markets are performing well.“It is a positive sign that delinquency levels have remained relatively low despite more borrowers receiving credit,” said Ezra Becker, VP of research and consulting in TransUnion’s financial services business unit. “We have seen a continued rise in the proportion of non-prime borrowers in both the auto loan and credit card industries, and that is a likely driver for the uptick in delinquency among recently originated cohorts in those sectors. We also believe lower energy prices and the resulting job losses in energy-dependent markets have played some role in delinquency rates. Even so, that impact appears at this point to be localized, and mild in terms of national effect.”Click here to view TransUnion’s entire Q4 2015 Industry Insights Report. Share Save Sign up for DS News Daily Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agolast_img read more