Over Concerns About Openness, OpenStack Founder Leaves Rackspace

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#cloud#news Related Posts alex williams Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img One of the founding members and chief architect for OpenStack says he could not get necessary changes to the open-source cloud effort made and has left Rackspace as a result. Rick Clark wrote in a blog post that he left Rackspace to pursue an opportunity at Cisco but also due to his inability to effectively lobby for changes he believes need to be made to the OpenStack effort.In particular he cited the OpenStack Governance Model that went underwent changes without community participation.OoenStack detailed the changes in a blog post. These include the election of technical leads for each project and the revamping of the Project Policy Board. There will also be a new Advisory Board.What Clark’s Departure MeansClark’s departure comes one month before the OpenStack Design Summit. The conference will help set the tone for its next evolution and test its mettle as an open organization.Openness made the Linux movement what it was. OpenStack is at a juncture that could define it as an open, community driven organization. The energy is behind the effort but confidence in the organization will in part depend on how it evolves. Clark questions that openness but is also a believer in OpenStack’s future. His post drew such attention that he took it upon himself to write a follow-up, clarifying his views about Rackpace and his support for OpenStack.Rackspace provided the following statement:Rackspace does not comment on the circumstances under which employees leave the company. We’ve gotten positive feedback on the recent changes in governance of OpenStack, with elections happening now. Code contributions continue to pour in from around the globe as we work toward the 3rd release (Cactus) April 14, followed by the second public Design Summit, April 26-29. With new developers and organizations joining and investing in the project every day, we’ve never been more excited about OpenStack’s future.In an interview, Clark said his new role at Cisco is as principal engineer and to help with open-source efforts. It was a huge opportunity he could not pass up. He thinks Rackspace is trying to do the right thing but needs to avoid the problem in the future. What he does not want is a fork. A split is bad for everyone.He supports the changes that Rackspace has made. There will be tech leads for each of the sub projects that are part of OpenStack. His role as chief architect is going away. “That’s how it should be,” Clark said.Five Big IssuesClark cited five issues in his original post that he says illustrate the problems at hand:Influence over Control. In Clark’s view, Rackspace is trying to control OpenStack more than influence it. The company had made changes to the governance of OpenStack without discussing with the community.Openness Matters. Clark says that from the start, OpenStack said openness and transparency were core to the organization. If that’s the case, then why did Rackspace not make it transparent and in the open about the changes it was making to the governance of the organization?Technology not Marketing. There’s concern that Rackspace is treating OpenStack as a marketing vehicle more than as the technology initiative it really is.Community means Participation. The OpenStack definition for community is wrong. Signing up partners does not mean the effort has a community. Partners did sign up to be a part of OpenStack but there is an issue with participation. Foundation, Foundation, Foundation. The code for OpenStack needs to go into a foundation. He writes: “Putting the code in a foundation similar to the Linux Foundation, is good for everyone. IANAL, but I believe it protects Rackspace from some types of legal liability, spreads out the cost of running the project, it shows that Rackspace understands that it doesn’t actually own the project, and it protects the project from management changes and changes of priorities at any one company. Most important of all, it encourages an ecosystem to develop, by placing everyone on fair and equal footing.”The Future of OpenStackThe future of OpenStack viewed from today’s vantage point tells a story about a movement that may be better defined by its second year than by its first.It was only OSCON last July when OpenStack launched. We have yet to see any major developments emerge from it. Those should come by next year.But in the meantime, there are some important issues to resolve before OpenStack is an open-source movement that is truly comparable to the Linux community. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

NAHB Green Expands to Whole-Community Certification

first_imgApproved by ANSI less than three months ago, the National Green Building Standard is off to a quick start with its land development certification of a 60-acre parcel in Northwest IndianaAlthough it was not heavily emphasized in late January when they were approved by the American National Standards Institute, the benchmarks and certification protocols of the ICC/NAHB 700, now known as the National Green Building Standard, are as relevant to whole communities as they are to single-family homes, apartments and condominiums, and remodeling projects.Compelling evidence of that is a 60-acre parcel in Northwest Indiana whose developer, T. Clifford Fleming, focused on environmental stewardship of the community by protecting environmentally sensitive areas, and by preserving existing vegetation and the natural water and drainage features on the site. Supplemented by thorough documentation, that effort earned the site the first land development certification awarded under the NGBS, the National Association of Home Builders announced this week.The development, formerly a backwater of unused farm fields and commercial sites, is now called The Village in Burns Harbor and has more than 1,000 new homes, renovation projects, and subdivisions being scored for NGBS certification, the NAHB said. The community eventually will include a mix of 265 single-family, semi-detached, and multifamily homes and a town center with retail, residential, and commercial development.Sixty homes have already been completed, NAHB added, including two single-family homes built by Coolman Communities that were certified earlier this year by the NAHB National Green Building Program.last_img read more

Who Can You Learn From?

first_imgMy teenage son asked me who my heroes were when I was his age. I struggled to come up with any names. I never really had any heroes, and I still don’t. But I do have a list of people who have shaped my thinking and my work.In 1995, I read Howard Bloom’s book The Lucifer Principle: A Scientific Journey Into the Forces of History. I wanted to understand memetics (memes, long before the word meme meant something gone viral on the Internet). So I emailed Bloom. He added me to a newsgroup that he was part of, and I dove in and started reading.Whenever I am in Brooklyn, I try to meet with Howard and buy him dinner or join him on his daily walk through the park, a walk that always entails stopping to interact with every canine between his flat and whatever coffee shop he will be working from. Howard’s work has had a tremendous influence on my work and my thinking.A few years later, I wanted to learn about John Boyd’s work, particularly OODA loops. Colonel Boyd had passed away long before I became familiar with his work. But in my studies, I came across the work of Chet Richards, one of the key people with whom Boyd worked. Chet had written a book called Certain to Win, in which he masterfully applied John Boyd’s work to business strategy.I emailed Chet, met him in Atlanta, bought him lunch (and maybe a couple nice beers), and he helped me to understand OODA Loops. Boyd and Richards both helped me think about strategy.I read every book and every blog post that Tom Peters has written. Tom was the first person to write about the importance of people in a business. And he doesn’t mince words about the obligation of leaders to empower their people; he really, really means it. Nor does he pull any punches when he speaks about the individual’s obligation to do their best work.Tom’s work helped me understand what business can—and should—be. I spent an hour on the phone with Tom interviewing him for this blog. I may not have any heroes, but I was thrilled beyond measure.Right now, I am studying everything Ken Wilber has written (which is a massive undertaking by itself). I am also listening to dozens of audio recordings to strengthen my understanding of his theories and their application to individuals and organizations (myself included). Wilber’s work provides a massive and complete framework for how people evolve and change, individually and in groups.I was fortunate enough to spend a few hours with Ken, and I have pages of notes. I’m working on the application of those ideas now.I am still a student. I still seek understanding. I still seek growth. I look for people who have something that I want to learn. Who can you learn from? Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Now From who have you learned the things that have shaped your thinking?Who has helped you develop your beliefs and your values?What are you reading and studying now that will help you live the life you want to live and make your contribution?Who should you be learning from now?last_img read more

Netflix will pass the 100 million subscriber mark

Netflix will pass the 100 million subscriber mark in 2018, with the UK due to be the SVoD service’s number one European market that year with 7.1 million subscribers, according to IHS.The research firm predicts that between now and 2019, Netflix subscriptions will grow by 22%, with 10 million new subscribers to be added in the US, 10 million in Western Europe and the rest coming from its other international markets.“International subscribers are key for Netflix. As Netflix invests more in international content, we expect to see huge growth in Western Europe over the next three years, with 10 million new subscribers to be added to its already burgeoning international base,” said Ted Hall, research director at IHS Technology.“Excluding spend on sports, in 2013 and 2014, Netflix outspent almost everyone on original and acquired content. In 2014, Netflix’s content spend was about double that of ITV and Amazon,” added Hall.In its third quarter earnings announcement, Netflix said that its global membership figure grew by 3.62 million to 69.17 million members and that it expects to end the year with 74 million members.In the US it had 43.18 million streaming subscribers in Q3 and internationally it had 25.99 members – though Netflix does not break down figures by international market.“The traditional linear channel will be around for a long time to come, but it will become increasingly marginalised by a plethora of online services, from catch-up TV to TV Everywhere, pay TV channels’ streaming offerings and YouTube multi-channel networks,” said Hall. read more