EMMET RUSHE: ARE YOU RUNNING YOUR WAY TO AN INJURY?

first_imgBY EMMET RUSHE: The running season is officially upon us.As the days get longer and the weather gets (a bit) better, you will see countless runners, walkers and joggers out on the roads, putting the miles in.You will pass solo runners, groups of joggers and people out walking for health and some weight loss. There are numerous “Couch to 5K” groups that are a great way for beginners to get active and take up a bit of running.In an article during the week, top physiotherapist Gerard Hartmann warned that;“Running on hard surfaces is brutal on the body: it leads to multiple injuries such as shin splints, patella tendonitis, stress fractures, lower back damage and disc problems.” He advised people to do;“80% of your running on grass. I can’t overestimate the damage on your body that running on hard surfaces causes.” This is not to say that he doesn’t want people out running. He simply believes that people take on too much too quickly and that their bodies are not able for the amount of impact that they are subjected to.With each foot strike you are putting 3 times your body weight through your joints, which is 30stone for a 10 stone person.If you are running downhill this increases to 7 times your bodyweight.For someone who is not an experienced runner this is a huge amount of impact, especially if they have been inactive up until taking up jogging or running.I actually covered a similar topic in an article from last year called; ‘Weight loss, to run or not to run’ The link is below if you would like to have a read.https://www.donegaldaily.com/2014/03/03/emmet-rushes-fitness-column-weight-loss-to-run-or-not-to-run/Hartmann also said many runners are making the error of not conditioning their bodies to be fit for running.Running is free, convenient and it needs no equipment, so it’s hugely popular. “It is exhilarating to be out running in the open air, and some people get ‘runner’s high’, which is a sense of euphoria after bouts of long running.“There is a great cardiovascular benefit, and runners are aerobically fit, but overdoing it is extremely bad for your body.”Hartmann’s emphasises that people have to condition their bodies to be fit for running.The old adage that ‘If you want to be a better runner, you have to run more’ is outdated and the importance of core strength, flexibility and total body strength is of huge importance to, not only recreational runners, but to runners of all levels.“They might run for hours but ask them to do a simple plank exercise, and they fall flat on their faces. Building up core strength is crucial.”“I advise maybe 40 minutes of jogging a week, two hours of strength and conditioning circuit training and a yoga class or at least 15 minutes of stretching every week.”“When you combine this with someone who doesn’t do any flexibility training and doesn’t do any strength exercising, then you are looking at guaranteed injuries.” You might ask what experience Hartmann has that he can make such bold statements regarding jogging and running.As it turns out, he has huge experience; Hartmann has treated 61 Olympic medal winners and 47 world champions.He has worked with Sonia O’Sullivan and Paula Radcliffe, Australian 400-metre champion Cathy Freeman, Kenyan Khalid Kanouchi, as well as Colin Jackson and Linford Christie.So it is safe to say that he might know a thing or two about running injuries.Personally, I have worked with runners preparing for everything up to half marathons.I work on getting them stronger, more stable and improving their core strength and I have yet to see any downside to having this alongside a structured running training program. Clients have actually improved their run times.What is the take home message form this?Is the advice to stop jogging and running?No.The main advice is to walk before you run.Get yourself stronger, more flexible and give your joints a break by doing frequent runs on softer, grass based surfaces.Build yourself up to longer events like marathons and give yourself plenty of time to prepare for them.Most of all stay fit and stay healthy and always #TrainSmart.To keep up to date with fitness and nutrition tips, be sure to follow me through the link below.https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rushe-Fitness/120518884715118EMMET RUSHE: ARE YOU RUNNING YOUR WAY TO AN INJURY? was last modified: June 29th, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:emmet rusemmet rushfitness columnInjuryRunninglast_img read more

Liliesleaf remembered 50 years on

first_img11 July 2013 Denis Goldberg was sitting in the lounge of the farmhouse reading a book when the South African police swooped on the high command of the African National Congress’s (ANC’s) military wing at Liliesleaf Farm back in 1963. The police must have been very pleased with themselves – they had hit bull’s eye: members of Umkhonto we Sizwe or MK were poring over Operation Mayibuye, the plan for guerrilla warfare in South Africa. This year marks the 50th anniversary of the raid on Liliesleaf, now in the upmarket suburb of Rivonia in northern Johannesburg, on 11 July 1963. In one of the outbuildings, six men were discussing Mayibuye – Raymond Mhlaba, Govan Mbeki, Lionel “Rusty” Bernstein, Walter Sisulu, Bob Hepple, and Ahmed Kathrada. Nelson Mandela himself was absent – he was serving a five-year sentence on Robben Island for inciting workers to strike, and for leaving the country without a passport. The men were all taken into custody and charged with sabotage, a sentence that carried the death penalty. But they didn’t go to the gallows – the resultant Rivonia Trial saw eight men convicted to life imprisonment, serving up to 27 years in jail.Banned The ANC had been banned in April 1960, forcing it to reconsider its commitment to non-violence, and to go underground. In mid-1961 it was decided to form Umkhonto we Sizwe, the Spear of the Nation. The farm at Liliesleaf was purchased, to be used for meetings of the ANC and MK. Mandela had at various times lived at Liliesleaf, in disguise as a gardener under the alias of David Motsamayi. The book Goldberg was reading was Brighter than a Thousand Suns: A Personal History of the Atomic Scientists, by Austrian Robert Jungk, first published in 1958. It is the first published account of the Manhattan Project and the German atomic bomb project, which studied the making and dropping of the deadly bomb, as told by the atomic scientists. It is based on interviews with those who played a major role in the construction and deployment of the bombs in WW2. “They hit the jackpot,” says Goldberg now. He recalls that he ran to the bathroom the moment he heard the police. He wanted to hide the notes he had made, showing his designs for the development of weapons. Goldberg trained as a civil engineer.Several ironies There is an irony in the fact that while MK were planning for armed resistance, not a single weapon was found at Liliesleaf. “The police searched the entire farm and confiscated hundreds of documents and papers, though they found no weapons,” writes Mandela in his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom. “One of the most important documents remained right on the table: Operation Mayibuye, a plan for guerrilla warfare in South Africa.” Another irony is that this was to be the last meeting at Liliesleaf. Hepple writes in a paper published in Social Dynamics in 1964 on the raid, “Rivonia: The story of accused no 11”, that they were aware that the police were getting closer to discovering Liliesleaf. “We all knew that the police were closing in on the leaders who were living underground. Many arrests had been made, including on June 25 that of five or six activists who knew about the Place.” That “Place” was Liliesleaf, of course, also referred to as “Lil’s place”. Hepple explains that there had been several breaches of security, with outsiders invited to Liliesleaf without approval, witnessing “eleven or twelve members of the central leadership”. Hepple, an advocate at the Johannesburg Bar at the time, wrote of his trip out to Liliesleaf: “I was full of anxieties as I drove from my chambers in central Johannesburg to the meeting at ‘Lil’s place’ (which is how we described Lilliesleaf Farm).”New headquarters Goldberg confirms that they had already bought a new headquarters, Travallyn in Krugersdorp, a small town on the western outskirts of Johannesburg. Several people had already moved into the small holding. But Bernstein had to get home within a specific time, as specified by his banning order. So it was agreed to meet at Liliesleaf for the last time. Hepple recounts the dramatic events on that afternoon at the farm: “It was about 3.15pm when a van was heard coming down the drive. Govan went to the window. He said, ‘It’s a dry-cleaning van. I’ve never seen it before’. Rusty then went to the window and exclaimed ‘My God, I saw that van outside the police station on the way here!’” Dogs were heard barking, and Bernstein shouted that it was the cops. “Govan had collected up the Operation Mayibuye document and some other papers and I saw him putting them in the chimney of the small stove in the room. The back window was open, and I helped Govan, Walter and Kathy [Kathrada’s nickname] jump out of it. There was a second or two as I moved back near the door, with Rusty next to me and Ray sitting next to the window. The door burst open. Detective Sergeant Kennedy, whom I had cross-examined in a political trial earlier that year, rushed in: ‘Stay where you are. You’re all under arrest.’ He walked up to me with an excited sneer: ‘You’re Advocate Hepple, aren’t you?’” It was all over. They were marched outside and searched, bundled into the back of the van, and after several hours, driven to The Fort in the city centre, then on to Pretoria Central Prison. Hepple spent three months in solitary confinement.Charged with sabotage Other arrests had been made. In October everyone appeared in the Supreme Court, charged with sabotage. Accused No 1 was Mandela, Hepple was Accused No 11. Hepple had been Mandela’s legal counsel when he was sentenced to five years on Robben Island in 1962. In an unexpected move, all charges against Hepple were withdrawn, and he was to be called as a witness for the state. He was released from prison. “I had no intention of testifying against the accused, whom I admired and respected,” he writes. He made plans to escape across the border into Botswana with his wife, on his way to Dar es Salaam, and on to London. “On Saturday, November 25th, as the news of Kennedy’s assassination broke, Shirley and I left our children and our parents, our home and friends, and the country we loved.” His children later joined him in London, where he still lives. He wrote his account a year later, just as the Rivonia trialists were sentenced to life imprisonment, on 12 June 1964. He went on to have a long and distinguished legal career. He is an international expert and activist in labour law, equality and human rights; Emeritus Master of Clare College and emeritus professor of law at the University of Cambridge in England; and has received several awards and honours, including a knighthood in 2004. Hepple launched a new book in Johannesburg this week, titled Young man with a Red Tie: a memoir of Mandela and the Failed Revolution 1960-1963. It recounts his escape to avoid testifying against the Rivonia trialists.Liliesleaf today The Liliesleaf farmhouse and outbuildings have been sensitively restored, and a new building housing a museum has been built on the site. “It is a site of immense significance,” says Nicholas Wolpe, CEO of the Liliesleaf Trust. Through the establishment of the Liliesleaf Trust and Legacy Project, the site has been developed into one of South Africa’s most prominent liberation landmarks. About 60% of the building infrastructure consists of original brickwork. During the excavation process, more than seven different types of brickface were uncovered and any post-1963 brick was discarded. This brickwork was used in the restoration of the historical buildings and structures, which today constitute the museum component of Liliesleaf, a project which began in mid-2004.Interactive museum experience A visit to Liliesleaf is much more than a dry history lesson. The interactive displays and beautifully restored buildings tell the story of commitment, dedication and selfless sacrifice of many people who fought for freedom from an oppressive apartheid government. A key component of the Liliesleaf Legacy Project has been the interviewing of numerous individuals linked to Liliesleaf, to build-up a comprehensive audiovisual archive of the farm’s history. The interactive tour takes visitors on a journey, retracing the footsteps of prominent anti-apartheid activists who spent time on the farm. At each point in the tour, visitors have an opportunity to experience a first-hand account of the events and circumstances leading up to the raid of the Rivonia farm, through interviews with struggle veterans. In the farmhouse, a large 3D interactive table allows visitors to pull up videos, images, audio and text about the farm’s history, using two aluminium navigator orbs. Tour guide Zein Khumalo says the table is the only one of its kind in the world. The electronically-controlled cabinet of curiosity holds an account of each event that culminated in the Rivonia trial. As each cabinet is pulled out, the accounts are automatically read out. A telephone rings in the corner of one of the manor house’s rooms – it’s one of those old bulky black phones with a dial, and on picking up the receiver, the telephone plays recorded stories of spy agents, terrorists and infiltrators. The award-winning touch screen technology, telephone stories, sparse furnishings and dark rooms convey the sense of secrecy, fear and tension that the struggle leaders must have lived with every day.In search of a historical artefact According to Wolpe, the vision for Liliesleaf Farm took root after a Rivonia trialists’ reunion on the site in 2001. This led to the farm being re-purchased and its original structures were uncovered by archaeological diggings. But after all the excavations, one important item is still missing – the search for Mandela’s highly prized Russian Makarov pistol is still on. Although it was reportedly only buried about 20 paces from the farmhouse kitchen, an extensive search still hasn’t delivered the artefact, now valued at about R22-million (US$3-million). The semi-automatic pistol is believed to be the first weapon of the war against apartheid. It was given to the young Nelson Mandela in 1962 by Colonel Biru Tadesse of the Ethiopian Riot Battalion in Addis Ababa, when Mandela was on a trip to seek military assistance. Mandela hid the pistol, and 200 rounds of ammunition, in a pit deep enough so that a plough could not uncover it, near an oak tree on the farm. At the time he hoped to retrieve it soon, but he never got the chance. A few weeks after he buried the firearm he was arrested and imprisoned.Celebrating South Africa’s journey to freedom As the search for the valuable firearm continues – and Wolpe thinks that renewed efforts will be successful – the Liliesleaf museum remains an important part of South Africa’s history. “Liliesleaf is our connection to South Africa’s past, a link to the present and a bridge to the future,” he says. What makes a visit to Liliesleaf worthwhile is that the individual memories of the struggle are conveyed by people who were actually there. It represents the beliefs, inspiration and aspirations of a fearless group of leaders who were committed to bringing about socio-political transformation based on democratic principles. “It is important that the memory and legacy of South Africa’s struggle for freedom is preserved in the hearts and minds of all South Africans,” he says. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

South Africa moves to unlock ‘blue economy’

first_img21 July 2014 Teams of representatives from the government, business, labour, civil society and academia have begun working on plans to unlock the economic potential of South Africa’s oceans, in the first activation of a new initiative, dubbed Operation Phakisa, that was launched by President Jacob Zuma on the weekend. Inspired by the “Big Fast Results” methodology successfully applied by Malaysia, Operation Phakisa – from the Sesotho word meaning “hurry up” – aims to fast-track the delivery of priorities outlined in the country’s National Development Plan. Key to this will be a series of “laboratories”, or work sessions, in which teams of experts and stakeholders conduct intensive planning at a practical and detailed level in order to deliver complete, signed-off action plans for presentation to Cabinet. The first implementation of Operation Phakisa will initially be led by the Department of Environmental Affairs, and focus on four priority sectors: marine transport and manufacturing, offshore oil and gas exploration, aquaculture, and marine protection services and governance. “South Africa is uniquely bordered by the ocean on three sides,” President Zuma told delegates at the launch of the initiative at the Inkosi Albert Luthuli International Convention Centre in Durban on Saturday. “With the inclusion of Prince Edward and Marion Islands in the southern ocean, the coastline is approximately 3 924 kilometres long.” But the full economic potential of this vast marine space remains largely untapped. South Africa’s oceans, Zuma said, have the potential to contribute up to R177-billion to the country’s gross domestic product (GDP), while creating up to 1-million new jobs, by 2033 – compared to R54-billion generated, and 316 000 jobs created, in 2010. In the area of marine transport and manufacturing, Zuma said, the expert/stakeholder work sessions would look at exploiting South Africa’s location and expertise to increase its share of the global marine manufacturing market, including ship-building and repair, and oil rig repair and refurbishment. They would also look at capturing the benefits of growing volumes of cargo handling, and supporting activities such as storage and warehousing. Regarding offshore oil and gas exploration, Zuma said the government was looking at creating a more enabling environment in order to increase the number of exploration wells drilled, while maximising the value captured for South Africa. The government was also looking at enhancing growth in aquaculture, which was relatively underdeveloped in South Africa despite being an increasingly important contributor to food security globally. At the same time, Zuma said, the government recognised the need to continuously balance the economic exploitation of the oceans with the maintenance of their environmental integrity. This would be achieved by developing an institutional framework for the management of South Africa’s ocean space, and by improving the protection of South Africa’s oceans, particularly around critically endangered ecosystems. Zuma said the expert/stakeholder teams – comprising over 180 representatives – had begun their work last week, and would spend next few weeks, until 15 August, “further developing these aspirations and ideas, setting ambitious targets, and formulating detailed delivery plans for accelerating delivery. “These work sessions will help create transparency and help to remove bottlenecks and resolve the most critical challenges facing a sector,” Zuma said. Once the plans had been completed and approved, Operation Phakisa would enter its first implementation phase, which would be rigorously monitored and measured against publicly stated targets. “The people of South Africa deserve much better from all of us,” Zuma said. “Through Operation Phakisa and all our other key strategic interventions to achieve the goals of the National Development Plan, we must work tirelessly to move our country forward and build a better life for all, especially the poor and the working class.” SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Job Opportunity: Drainage worker, Crawford Drainage Company

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Job Title: Full time Position here at Crawford Drainage Co. Company Name: Crawford Drainage Co. Job Description: www.crawforddrainage.com Must not be afraid to get dirty and job is very physical Good Pay starting wage $15.00 an Hour + Tile footage commission 401K Program & Paid Vacation after 90 Day Probation Period General Conditions • honest, dependable and detailed individuals who can problem solve, work hard, • Dependable, Punctual and HARD WORKING A MUST • works well with other people • Physically fit and able to tolerate weather conditions • Must have a CLEAN driving record, • Drug Free, Job Type: Full-time Salary: $30,000.00 to $50,000.00 /year Education or Experience Requirements: Construction Skills A Plus • Able to skillfully operate various pieces of equipment such as Excavator/Backhoe, Dozer and skid steer. • Will train to run heavy equipment as the time comes. • Clean Class A CDL a plus Deadline to Apply: 10/19/19 Application Information: please send resume to [email protected] Contact Information: Ken Niese Owner www.crawforddrainage.com 419-564-4720last_img read more

Field Talk: A Q&A with Providers Supporting Military Families

first_imgDiPietro-Wells, R. (2015). Field Talk: A Q&AField Talk is a monthly blog post sharing the voices of early childhood providers who serve or have served military families of young children with disabilities (birth to 5 years old).  We hope you find it to be educational, personable, and encouraging.This month we talked with Linda Stanfill, OTR/L.  Ms. Stanfill is an occupational therapist and the owner and operator of Cornerstone Pediatric Therapies, LLC in Clarksville, TN.  This interview has been edited for length and clarity.Describe your current role. My role is to provide therapeutic care to children ages birth-12 years and parent education to enhance the self-care, play, and academic skills of their children. My other roles involve managing a small clinic with 6 employees.What’s your favorite part of your current job?My favorite part of my job has always been working with the children and getting to know their families intimately. It has been my great pleasure to be a part of the journey that families find themselves on with their children.Tell us about experiences you have had working with military families.Ninety percent of the children I see are members of military families. Being from a military background myself, both as a child and as an adult, I understand the challenges and benefits of this unique lifestyle especially being separated from your extended family and having limited access to help with life’s daily ups and downs.How did you come to work with military families?I moved to this military town with my family when I was a teenager. Once I began working with children in this area 18 years ago, military families became the most common population referred to my clinic.Describe a rewarding experience working with military families.My experiences with those I serve have been very rewarding. It is my intention to make every family feel like our staff is their extended family offering any support, encouragement or other special needs they may have as they provide for their children, including lending a listening ear when needed, giving Starbucks cards to a frazzled mom, and even using my roadside assistance for a locked car. I do not need to be thanked for what I do but I have many treasured cards from families who have moved away or “graduated” from therapy telling me about the impact our clinic has made in their lives. I am grateful for the unique position I have.Describe a challenging experience working with military families.One of the most challenging aspects of working with families in general, but especially military families, has been keeping the child on a consistent schedule. It is difficult to be far from home with no one to assist with daily challenges. Initially, our families have the perception that we do what we do for monetary gain alone. It takes time for a family to begin to relax and let their guard down, but once they see we are not here to judge but to help, our relationship becomes deeper.From your experience, how are military families similar and different from other types of families? How do you change your practice between families?Military families have more difficulty making it to therapy on time or at their scheduled appointments. They come into the lobby frazzled and with several children in tow. We have mostly mothers who bring their children to therapy. At times they have to arrange transportation with their spouses, dropping them off at work prior to using the car for therapy or errands. We also have mothers whose spouses are deployed and they are in the area without family. We have children whose mothers are deployed and their other parent has a much more difficult time justifying leaving work for their children’s appointments. We try to make life more manageable in any way we can. This means we make every effort to schedule appointments when it is best for the family. We have very flexible families and if we ask one family to adjust their schedule because another family needs that time, military families do not hesitate to do what they can to help.As providers, how can we support military parents who are deployed or away frequently due to trainings/school?  Being aware of the family’s needs outside the realm of therapy is a great start. Adopting a perspective of treating the family as a whole actually has multiple benefits for the child’s progress toward goals. It has to be a partnership to achieve goals that fit for everyone. What we do once or twice a week will not effect nearly the same change as what the parent can do during the remainder of the week.Describe a specific stressor that military families with whom you have worked have shared or experienced.We meet moms who have very little contact with other parents. Many enjoy the company of other moms in the waiting room while their children are in therapy. They receive fellowship, advice and support regarding their child’s disabilities or life in general. Lack of time and management thereof is the biggest source of stress that I see in the parents we service.What “insider” tips or advice do you have for service providers working with military families who have young children with disabilities?Making home exercises manageable and functional for their daily lives will increase the likelihood that exercises will be performed.If you could change or improve one thing for military families with young children with disabilities, what would it be?I would love to see moms become more confident about their abilities to manage their responsibilities. Too often, they second guess themselves or feel judged by others. These moms are amazing at the flexibility and resilience they must have to provide so much of the family’s needs on their own. I wish they could be proud of what they accomplish and not focus so much on the tasks left undone or performed in a “less than perfect” way.What types of resources have you sought out to feel more confident and competent at meeting the specific needs of military families? (e.g., trainings, blog posts, organizations, etc.)I read articles written by colleagues and seek assistance from resources. I get a lot of my child friendly activities from Pinterest because the moms and therapists who post on that website have amazing ideas!This post was written by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

How To Invest In Your Personal Growth When You Are Broke

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now Anonymous writes: “I want to improve myself, but I don’t have any money to invest in programs.”Even though you may not have a lot of money right now, you have to invest as much as you possibly can in your personal and professional development. In fact, if you don’t have money now, you should invest so much that it is uncomfortable for you. It’s the fastest way to change your financial situation—forever.But let’s look at what you can do with little to no money.You are the primary asset you have with which to generate all of the results in your life. And, happily, you own that asset free and clear. But the asset that is “you” isn’t worth what it could be, and this true no matter who you are and no matter what your present value is now. You are like a large plot of land; you aren’t as valuable as you might be until you start making improvements.So where to begin when you don’t have much to invest? Not to worry. You only need to invest your time and your energy.First, the Internet is the greatest, free personal and professional development resource in the known Universe. Maybe you want to improve your sales skills. Maybe you want to learn to be a better sales manager. Maybe you want to learn how to build a community. Maybe you want to improve your mindset. Maybe you need to be more resourceful, more creative. Maybe you want greater business acumen. It’s all here, and it’s all free.You can also download eBooks on virtually anything that interests you. Some smart people post PDFs and PowerPoint presentations you can download and study.Second, let’s say you can scrape together $90. That’ll buy you about four books. Or you could buy a Kindle from Amazon.com and reduce the cost of almost every book you read from that point forward to about $9.99. More still, your reader will let you highlight passages, take notes right in the book, and it will create Kindle page where you can store them for future reference. For less than $10 and 6 hours of your life, you can learn something from someone who spent the better part of their life studying, learning, and writing about their chosen subject.Maybe you want to listen to people speak about some subject that might enhance your overall knowledge of how the world works. You can find a master class on creativity, gamification, drive, market segmentation, or leadership. All of this and more is only a few mouse clicks away.Of all of the investments you can make, none will produce a greater return. The time you spend developing yourself personally and professionally will increase your earnings and the quality of your life for the rest of your life. And even if you have a college education, there is no reason to stop learning, to stop developing, and to stop growing.Invest in yourself.QuestionsWhat do you need to learn?What would your own personal or professional development plan need to look like to learn what you need to know now?How much money would you need to invest to study a half an hour a day?What’s stopping you from making investments?last_img read more

Payal Tadvi suicide: Bombay HC to film bail plea hearing of 3 accused

first_imgThe Bombay High Court on Thursday directed its registry department to make arrangements to film the hearing of the bail pleas of three resident doctors, arrested for allegedly abetting the suicide of their junior at a civic-run hospital in the city, on July 30.Justice D.S. Naidu was hearing bail pleas filed by Dr. Hema Ahuja, Dr. Bhakti Mehare and Dr. Ankita Khandelwal, who were arrested on May 29 for making casteist slurs against their junior Dr. Payal Tadvi, leading to her suicide.Tadvi (26), a second-year postgraduate medical student attached to BYL Nair Hospital, committed suicide in her hostel room on May 22.Justice Naidu on Thursday noted that Section 15 (a) (10) of the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities) mandates that all proceedings under the act have to be video recorded by the court concerned. The provision was pointed out to the court by advocate Gunaratan Sadavarte, who appeared for the victim’s mother.While special public prosecutor Raja Thakare said it was a policy matter, advocate Aabad Ponda, appearing for the accused, said the provision is only for trial proceedings and not bail hearings. Justice Naidu, however, said that it would be implied for all judicial proceedings.“I cannot ignore the statutory provisions. While I am sympathetic towards the fact that this would mean a delay in hearing of the bail pleas, but it is also imperative that the provisions of the act are followed,” the judge said.The court then directed the high court’s registry department to make necessary arrangements for video-recording and posted the bail pleas for further hearing on July 30.Justice Naidu said as a judge, he was known for recording court proceedings that he uses his mobile phone to record audios of arguments of lawyers in important cases. Mr. Ponda, while seeking bail, argued that the accused are educated persons and not criminals.“We are not criminals. We know that something unfortunate has happened and a woman has lost her life. But life has to go on. We will face the trial,” Ponda said.The accused have been suspended from the Nair hospital, he said, adding they just want to complete their education and propose to stay out of Mumbai.Mr. Ponda further pointed out that the chargesheet filed by the prosecution places reliance on the purported suicide note, the photos of which were recovered from Tadvi’s mobile.“The suicide note speaks about harassment meted out with regard to work. There is no whisper about caste or that the accused persons made remarks about the victim’s caste,” Mr. Ponda argued.The three doctors have been booked under IPC sections for abetment of suicide and destruction of evidence, and provisions of the Maharashtra Prohibition of Ragging Act and the Scheduled Castes and the Scheduled Tribes (Prevention of Atrocities).They are presently in judicial custody.Tadvi’s family alleged that three of her seniors – Ahuja, Meher and Khandelwal – ragged her and hurled casteist abuses at her, forcing Tadvi to take her life. Mumbai police’s Crime Branch on Tuesday filed a chargesheet against the three accused. The over 1,800-page charge sheet, filed before a special court here, contains a copy of the three-page suicide note allegedly written by Tadvi before hanging herself in her hostel room.last_img read more

Game 2 loss blessing in disguise for newly-crowned Blue Eaglets

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa MOST READ For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexico John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netIt may not have been a perfect season for Ateneo, but for coach Joe Silva, winning the UAAP Season 80 juniors’ basketball championship still tastes sweet no matter how you win it.“All we wanted to do is to win the championship, whether we had to sweep or do it the hard way,” he said after the Blue Eaglets claimed the title with a 63-58 Game 3 win over the NU Bullpups on Friday. “All our main focus, our main direction was to win a championship.”ADVERTISEMENT “Fortunately, we lost,” he said as the Blue Eaglets once again focused on what they need to do to accomplish their set goal. “We needed that, not just in basketball, but in terms of the character of the boys. At least, the boys were humbled down.”Silva saw the differences—from the practices to the bus ride to the venue, to moments before Game 3 started — that Ateneo is hell-bent on bagging its first title in three years.“We had the right mindset coming into this game. We really knew that we wanted the championship,” he said.And just like the last time he hoisted the trophy with his Blue Eaglets, Silva still revels in the celebration of this recent success.“We took the same route but its a different cast of characters, different experiences. Both are fulfilling,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Stephen Curry shatters hotel table after golf blunder LATEST STORIES Read Next Finishing with a perfect 14-0 sweep of the eliminations, Ateneo seemed poised to complete the rare perfect season.As much as Silva and the players tried to downplay the situation, they knew that eventually, the streak would get in their heads — something which happened in Game 2, when the Blue Eaglets fell for the first time, 70-67, last Tuesday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“If I’ll mention in Game 2, I felt that the sweep got in our heads. We didn’t play well,” he admitted.But Silva looked at it as a blessing in disguise—a much-needed humbling experience for Ateneo. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving AFP official booed out of forum View commentslast_img read more