Binnie ‘happy’ with overall performance

first_imgKINGSTON:Jamaican and Caribbean men’s champion Chris Binnie finished second at the TRAC North of Scotland Professional Squash Association tournament which wrapped up on Sunday in Aberdeen, Scotland.Although unseeded, Binnie fought his way to the final, beating Richie Fallows of England 11-9, 3-11, 11-2, 11-8 in the first round, and Fallows’ teammate Joe Green 6-11, 12-10, 11-9, 11-4 in the quarter-finals.In the semi-finals Binnie rallied from a first game loss to beat Englishman Eddie Charlton, ranked 65 in the world, 4-11, 11-7, 11-4, 11-7.However, the Jamaican’s winning streak ended in the final, as he went down 4-11, 4-11, 7-11 to Yousseff Soliman of Egypt.”Although I’m disappointed that I lost in the final I am very happy about my performance throughout the week as it will improve my ranking,” said Binnie.The national and regional champion is heading to Switzerland to compete in the Pilatus Cup, which starts tomorrow.”There were many positives to take away from doing well in Scotland and I’ll be working for an even better result in Switzerland,” said Binnie.last_img read more

Boss refusing to comment on striker’s return to West Brom

first_imgUwe Rosler is remaining tight-lipped over Saido Berahino’s return to West Bromwich Albion following his loan spell at Brentford.The striker made a great start to life at Griffin Park and scored four goals in eight appearances, but his time at the club was cut short this week.He was recently dropped by Bees boss Rosler for venting his fury on Twittter after being taken off during a defeat against Leyton Orient.Rosler said: “We and West Brom made a statement that he went back for personal reasons. Personal reasons can be different things. I respect that.“I will only comment on Brentford players. Saido is no longer a Brentford player, so I think [only] West Brom should comment on the issue.”See also:Striker Berahino returns to AlbionBerahino helps Bees destroy CarlisleBerahino delivers again for BrentfordBerahino targets play-offs with BrentfordWhat next for Brentford after their mad March?Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

This Friday, Celebrate Beautiful SA!

first_img6 September 2010Plant a tree. Host a recycling day. Help clean up around your home, school, place of work … as part of its “Legacy” campaign, Brand SA has called on South Africans this Friday to “fly the flag for our beautiful country.”Brand South Africa’s Legacy campaign aims to leverage the momentum of the 2010 Fifa World Cup by providing platforms for South Africans to keep achieving and showcasing their “South Africanness” to the world, while entrenching the principles of pride, patriotism and solid citizenship that have been established over the past year.SA Legacy campaign explainedFor the past two Fridays, and the next three to come, South Africans have been “celebrating all the things that make us who we are”. Each Friday has a different theme, this Friday’s being a call to celebrate South Africa’s natural beauty by, for example:Hosting a recycling day. Ask everyone to bring in paper, glass, plastic and tins to be recycled and given a new lease on life.Planting a tree at home, at school, at your office or in a community space..Hosting a clean-up day around the office, your school or community.Celebrate Our Beautiful Country – poster“Thousands of new visitors experienced South Africa during the 2010 Fifa World Cup™ and went home with memories to last a lifetime,” Brand South Africa said in a statement. “We impressed the world with our ability to unite for a common cause and create a legacy for our country and children.“We now know what we can do when we stand together, so let’s do it again this Friday – by making sure our country stays beautiful for generations to come.”SAinfo reporterSA Legacy campaign: programmeWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Gallery: Celebrate Marine Month in South Africa

first_imgCompiled by Melissa JavanNational Marine Month, which begins on 1 October, promotes awareness of South Africa’s marine and coastal environments, as well as of the benefits that our oceans bring to our nation.South Africa is nestled between two currents, and two oceans:The warm Agulhas Current, with rich ocean biodiversity, but not large fish stocks; andThe cold Benguela Current, which supports large fisheries such as those focused on the small pelagic (anchovy and sardine) and the demersal (hake) stocks.The Indian Ocean, on the east side of the country, is warmed by the Mozambique or Agulhas Current, which flows down from the tropics, while the Atlantic Ocean, on the west coast, is cooled by the icy Benguela Current, which comes up from the Antarctic. The Agulhas and the Benguela currents, in addition to the cold southern oceans, are key drivers of South African climate and rainfall conditions. (Image: Wikipedia)Learn more here about where the two oceans meet.Learn more here about South Africa’s geography.Photos that are copyright Media Club South Africa and Brand South Africa may be used free of charge for editorial purposes, on condition that Media Club South Africa and Brand South Africa are credited.Reasons why you should care about our oceans The world’s oceans generate most of the oxygen we breathe. (Image: Brand South Africa) The ocean regulates our climate. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica) The ocean is the producer of moisture to the atmosphere, which leads to rain. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica) Rain, which is mainly produced by the ocean, plays a vital role in agriculture. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica) The ocean cleans the water we drink. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica) Global trade is dominated by sea transport. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica) The ocean boosts tourism and has a positive impact on the economy. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica) The ocean offers us a pharmacopoeia of potential medicines. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica) The ocean helps to feed us; it also creates skills development opportunities and employment. (Image: MediaClubSouthAfrica)Initiatives that involve the oceanLearn more here about the government’s Operation Phakisa initiative.Find out more here about the government’s water programmes that create job opportunities.Read more here about how the ocean plays a role in tackling the energy crisis.This article was originally posted on the South African Government website.last_img read more

Field Talk: A Q&A with Providers Supporting Military Families

first_imgDiPietro-Wells, R. (2015). Field Talk: A Q&AField Talk is a monthly blog post sharing the voices of early childhood providers who serve or have served military families of young children with disabilities (birth to 5 years old).  We hope you find it to be educational, personable, and encouraging.This month we talked with Linda Stanfill, OTR/L.  Ms. Stanfill is an occupational therapist and the owner and operator of Cornerstone Pediatric Therapies, LLC in Clarksville, TN.  This interview has been edited for length and clarity.Describe your current role. My role is to provide therapeutic care to children ages birth-12 years and parent education to enhance the self-care, play, and academic skills of their children. My other roles involve managing a small clinic with 6 employees.What’s your favorite part of your current job?My favorite part of my job has always been working with the children and getting to know their families intimately. It has been my great pleasure to be a part of the journey that families find themselves on with their children.Tell us about experiences you have had working with military families.Ninety percent of the children I see are members of military families. Being from a military background myself, both as a child and as an adult, I understand the challenges and benefits of this unique lifestyle especially being separated from your extended family and having limited access to help with life’s daily ups and downs.How did you come to work with military families?I moved to this military town with my family when I was a teenager. Once I began working with children in this area 18 years ago, military families became the most common population referred to my clinic.Describe a rewarding experience working with military families.My experiences with those I serve have been very rewarding. It is my intention to make every family feel like our staff is their extended family offering any support, encouragement or other special needs they may have as they provide for their children, including lending a listening ear when needed, giving Starbucks cards to a frazzled mom, and even using my roadside assistance for a locked car. I do not need to be thanked for what I do but I have many treasured cards from families who have moved away or “graduated” from therapy telling me about the impact our clinic has made in their lives. I am grateful for the unique position I have.Describe a challenging experience working with military families.One of the most challenging aspects of working with families in general, but especially military families, has been keeping the child on a consistent schedule. It is difficult to be far from home with no one to assist with daily challenges. Initially, our families have the perception that we do what we do for monetary gain alone. It takes time for a family to begin to relax and let their guard down, but once they see we are not here to judge but to help, our relationship becomes deeper.From your experience, how are military families similar and different from other types of families? How do you change your practice between families?Military families have more difficulty making it to therapy on time or at their scheduled appointments. They come into the lobby frazzled and with several children in tow. We have mostly mothers who bring their children to therapy. At times they have to arrange transportation with their spouses, dropping them off at work prior to using the car for therapy or errands. We also have mothers whose spouses are deployed and they are in the area without family. We have children whose mothers are deployed and their other parent has a much more difficult time justifying leaving work for their children’s appointments. We try to make life more manageable in any way we can. This means we make every effort to schedule appointments when it is best for the family. We have very flexible families and if we ask one family to adjust their schedule because another family needs that time, military families do not hesitate to do what they can to help.As providers, how can we support military parents who are deployed or away frequently due to trainings/school?  Being aware of the family’s needs outside the realm of therapy is a great start. Adopting a perspective of treating the family as a whole actually has multiple benefits for the child’s progress toward goals. It has to be a partnership to achieve goals that fit for everyone. What we do once or twice a week will not effect nearly the same change as what the parent can do during the remainder of the week.Describe a specific stressor that military families with whom you have worked have shared or experienced.We meet moms who have very little contact with other parents. Many enjoy the company of other moms in the waiting room while their children are in therapy. They receive fellowship, advice and support regarding their child’s disabilities or life in general. Lack of time and management thereof is the biggest source of stress that I see in the parents we service.What “insider” tips or advice do you have for service providers working with military families who have young children with disabilities?Making home exercises manageable and functional for their daily lives will increase the likelihood that exercises will be performed.If you could change or improve one thing for military families with young children with disabilities, what would it be?I would love to see moms become more confident about their abilities to manage their responsibilities. Too often, they second guess themselves or feel judged by others. These moms are amazing at the flexibility and resilience they must have to provide so much of the family’s needs on their own. I wish they could be proud of what they accomplish and not focus so much on the tasks left undone or performed in a “less than perfect” way.What types of resources have you sought out to feel more confident and competent at meeting the specific needs of military families? (e.g., trainings, blog posts, organizations, etc.)I read articles written by colleagues and seek assistance from resources. I get a lot of my child friendly activities from Pinterest because the moms and therapists who post on that website have amazing ideas!This post was written by Robyn DiPietro-Wells & Michaelene Ostrosky, PhD, members of the MFLN FD Early Intervention team, which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more