Can the AstraZeneca share price hold up after a failed drug trial?

first_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Karl Loomes | Monday, 27th January, 2020 | More on: AZN The Motley Fool UK has recommended AstraZeneca. Karl has shares in AstraZeneca. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. It’s a fact of the pharmaceutical business that not all drug trials result in a promising product, unfortunately for pharmaceutical companies, shareholders and most importantly patients. Indeed it’s the very nature of drug trials to discover if the proposed medication works as planned. A failed drug trial, as much as investors may not like it from a financial standpoint, scientifically is almost as valuable as a successful one – the trial did its job.It’s in this light that news this month from AstraZeneca (LSE: AZN) saying the company will be writing-down $100m after trials of its heart disease drug Epanova were “disappointing”, must be taken. In fact it should be noted that the drug in question is actually successful and already in use. It’s a treatment for a specific type of condition that increases the risk of heart disease. The failed trial was undertaken in hopes that it may work on another specific type of condition, which it failed to do.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Research and developmentIn many ways, the R&D departments of big pharmaceutical companies are where the money is made. Developing new and better medications, I’d argue, is usually more important than all the admin, sales work and perhaps even management that a company has. I’d say, for example, that a pharmaceutical company could make money if it invented a cure for cancer, even if it was badly managed and had poor sales staff.R&D is an area in which AstraZeneca has really stepped up over the past few years, and in no small way has been responsible for what many call a turnaround following a rather lacklustre period. Its new medicines have been accounting for a big chunk of its sales, with heart disease treatments and oncology medications some of its most notable money-makers.Carving out a nicheIt’s with its oncology treatments that Astra has in many ways been distinguishing itself from the competition. While the majority of cancer treatments have generally focused on later stages of the disease, AstraZeneca has instead been focusing more towards early detection, prevention and treatment. This has been giving it an advantage.And it has been pro-active in addressing one major issue facing ‘big pharma’ too. This is, of course, the growth of cheap, generic versions of branded drugs, particularly after the patents end, and particularly in China. While AstraZeneca has not been immune to these troubles, it has managed to offset much of the damage through working with local hospitals and the government in China to help secure fair prices for its treatments.So to answer the title question of this article, I think the failed trial will by no means have a detrimental impact on Astra shares. As I said earlier, the aim of the trial was to see if this drug could work or not in a specific case – it couldn’t, and so the trial actually did what it was supposed to.Far more important for the company is its increased interest in and spending on the R&D of new drugs. If it keeps that up, a few failed trials will easily be absorbed by the exponential benefits of just one or two great drugs. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Can the AstraZeneca share price hold up after a failed drug trial? I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement.center_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Address Image source: Getty Images. See all posts by Karl Loomeslast_img read more

Ann Gloag donates £1 million to Compassionate Nursing Initiative

first_img Howard Lake | 7 June 2007 | News  41 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Recruitment / people The project will see the establishment of four Beacon Wards throughout NHS Lothian, where existing best practice will be nurtured and rolled out elsewhere. In addition, a new online mentoring service will be introduced along with master-classes for students and graduates, and a dedicated website providing advice and support.Gloag was awarded an honorary doctorate from Napier University in 2005. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img Ann Gloag donates £1 million to Compassionate Nursing Initiative AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Stagecoach entrepreneur Ann Gloag OBE has donated £1 million towards a Napier University-NHS Lothian project to improve compassionate care in nursing. The three-year Leadership in Compassionate Care initiative aims to ensure patients “receive the compassionate, person-centred care they expect and deserve”.Gloag said: “Nurses have many more time pressures and responsibilities today than when I was a nurse and as a result, sometimes, the care a patient receives lacks the ‘human touch’ that is so important.“This initiative is designed to help nurses ensure that compassion is part of everything they do and that is why I am pleased to fund the project for the next three years. We hope the initiative will result in improvements that can then be rolled out across Scotland with the backing of the Scottish Executive.” Advertisementlast_img read more