COMMUNITY NOTICE: 10K CHARITY FUN RUN IN AID OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL IN DUNKINEELY

first_imgBruckless/Killaghtee/Dunkineely NewsDunkineely FestivalDunkineely Festival will be held on the weekend of the 28th-30th August.The Start of the Festival will be @ 7pm on the 28th with the Killaghtee Marching Band.The Official Schedule will be available over the next few weeks. Here is just a taste of upcoming events: Soap Car Racing, Marching Bands, Late Night Dance, Youth Disco, Adult Dance night / Games, Children’s Play area, Bouncy Castle, face painting, etc, etc. Music and quizzes in all local Bar’s, Pet Show.Anybody willing to help, please contact Gerry on 087 6993095. Thank you.We look forward to seeing you there! Trip to Tipp Summer Bus TourConneely Travel and JIW Tours have organised their annual summer special 3 day tour for Tipperary and Laois on Tues 28th to Thurs 30th July. This is a fun, social bus tour outing, with some gentle strolls, shopping, social dancing and a guided tour along the way. The tour includes visits to Emo Forest Park, Holy Cross Abbey and the Rock of Cashel. For further info, cost and bookings, ring Keith on 087-9213200.Bruckless Cemetery SundayCemetery Sunday will be held on Sunday 26th July at 4:00pm. Parishioners are asked the tidy up their family plots for the occasion. Thank you.Adult Religious Education Course8/10 weeks – one evening per week starting in September (PG). Topics covered: Baptism, Penance, Eucharist, Extra unction, Holy Orders, Matrimony, Our Lady, The Saints. This will be a short course with basic information on the Sacraments and is suitable for anyone with an interest in the faith. It will be helpful for those who would like to gain more knowledge about the faith. The title of the course is “I Believe”. If you are interested contact the parish office at Bruckless by phoning (074)9737015.CoursesDunkineely Community Ltd (DCL) are planning a six week course in either Upcycling (i.e. converting old and waste materials into something new and useful e.g. furniture) or a Follow-on Interior Design Course with Sile Kelly (the most popular of these two would run).If you are interested in any of these, please contact the DCL office on 087 3421922 or 074 9737678 as soon as possible. Courses will run subject to application for ETB part funding on the Community Education Support Programme. ETB Adult Education ServicesThe following courses for adults may be commencing in Donegal Town in the near future.(1) European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) Monday & Tuesday 9.45am to 1.45pm(2) QQI (FETAC) Level 4 Major Award in Information and Communications Skills. Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 9.45am to 1.45pm(3) QQI (FETAC) Level 5 Major Award in Nursing Studies. Thursday & Friday 9.30am to 2.30pm and alternate Wednesday 9.30am – 1.30pm. (limited places available).(4) QQI (FETAC) Level 5 Major Award in Early Childhood Care & Education. Monday & Tuesday 9.30am to 1.45pm and alternate Wednesday 9.45am to 1.45pm. (limited places available).The courses are part-time and are free of charge to any adult with less than upper second level education / have a social welfare payment / have a medical card. Courses are accredited by QQI (Quality and Qualifications Ireland) and do not affect existing social welfare entitlements. For further information and an application form contact: 074 9725520 or email: [email protected] RepresentativeCllr. Niamh Kennedy will be available for members of the community in DCL office, Dunkineely on Thursday evenings 5:30 – 7:30pm. Mobile: (087)2062336 Email: [email protected] agus CraicTraditional music session each Wednesday at McIntyre’s Bar, Dunkineely at 10pm. All musicians and singers welcome.Recovery from Emotional DistressG.R.O.W. – Gradually, Regaining, Our, Wellbeing! Support and a program for recovery. Weekly Meetings at Niall Mor Centre, Killybegs on Thursday evenings at 7:30pm. Also in the Day Hospital, adjacent to Donegal Hospital on Tuesday evenings at 8:00pm. For further information contact Marian on (086)7856912. All are welcome.Daisy DaysThese days are for the children of Donegal who have Downs Syndrome, Mitochondrial Disease, and any additional needs children of the county. The Daisy Days will be held in Daisy Cottage, Dunkineely on the 23rd and 28th of August next. Sunday the 23rd August is for the babies and children up to 6 years old.Friday the 28th August is for 7 years to teens.So far in the entertainment side we have Mickey & Minnie Mouse coming for the younger children and babies and for the older children we have Jose with his birds from the Raptor Rescue Centre in Glenties and also one or two rally cars coming.We want to make it a fun day out for these children and young adults and so am trying to enlist the help of as many as possible to make them days to remember.We have some offers of help (making tea, washing up, homemade buns/cakes etc.) more help would be very welcome. We would particularly welcome the help of musicians, face painters, magicians etc. You can be contact Kathrine McGlynn on 074-9125942 or 087-6188340 or at [email protected] Point 10kThe Point 10k Charity Fun Run/Walk will be held this year on Saturday the 15th of August. This year’s charities are St. Vincent De Paul (Donegal Branch) and Spina Bifda Hydrocephalus (Donegal Branch). We hope to see a big turnout to support these two brilliant charities that help the local community.Registration and entries will take place on the day from 9am – 10:30am at the Dunkineely Methodist Hall, try to register before 11.00am as race starts at this time. Entry fee: Adults = €10, Students & Youths = €6. Prizes for all categories!!Refreshments will be served after In the Methodist Hall in the centre of the town.DCL OfficePlease feel free to pop into the office any morning Mon-Fri 9.30-12.30 and chat with Michael, use the Internet (20c per half hour), print or photocopy documents (20c per page) or borrow a book (20c per book).Going on a Sun Holiday?Print you Boarding Pass with us in the DCL office.Researching a Family Tree?DCL has a copy of the adjoining Methodist Church index of Births & Marriages 1860 -1899 (Ardara and Dunkineely). Also the Burials Register for the same congregations from 1950 to 2007.LibraryDunkineely Community Ltd (DCL) – Has a small library of over 500 books from Children’s Literature, Teenage Fiction (The Fault in our stars), Classics (Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice), Horror, Comedy, Booker-Prize etc. Borrowing 20c per book.COMMUNITY NOTICE: 10K CHARITY FUN RUN IN AID OF ST VINCENT DE PAUL IN DUNKINEELY was last modified: July 21st, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:FeaturesNoticeslast_img read more

Adult Stem Cells Outpace Embryonics

first_img(Visited 30 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Some still play with embryos, but there seems little reason for it when adult stem cells perform so well.Researchers learn how to grow old brain cells (Science Daily): Good news from the Salk Institute. “For the first time, scientists can use skin samples from older patients to create brain cells without rolling back the youthfulness clock in the cells first. The new technique, which yields cells resembling those found in older people’s brains, will be a boon to scientists studying age-related diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.”Mesenchymal stem cells use extracellular vesicles to outsource mitophagy and shuttle microRNAs (Nature Communications): Basic research at Scripps is helping understand why mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show promise in animal studies and human clinical trials. “Collectively, these studies mechanistically link mitophagy and MSC survival with macrophage function, thereby providing a physiologically relevant context for the innate immunomodulatory activity of MSCs.”Transplantation of unique, newly discovered stems cells may lead to promising stroke therapy (Science Daily): Preventing viral invasions is essential to keeping one’s adult stem cells healthy and ready for their functions. This article pits adult stem cells against embryonic stem cells by discussing “Muse cells” found in a variety of tissues, including bone marrow, fat tissues and skin. “Muse cells are unique stem cells that are able to self-renew and also display high efficiency for differentiating into neuron-like cells,” a researcher from U of South Florida says.  But can they beat embryos?According to the researchers, fetal stem cells may appear to be better candidates for replacing lost neural circuitry, considering that they preferentially differentiate toward being neuronal cells. However, fetal stem cell accessibility is limited and, like embryonic stem cells, their immaturity may present safety issues, such as tumor development. Also, the use of fetal and embryonic stem cells has been the topic of many ethical debates. Since Muse cells can be derived from adult tissue rather than fetal or embryonic tissue, the ethical quandaries associated with stem cell therapy may be considerably allayed with their use.Not only do Muse cells also have the practical advantage of being non-tumorigenic, they are readily accessed commercially and can also be easily collected from patient skin biopsies. Once more, Muse cells do not have to be “induced,” or genetically manipulated, to be pluripotent as required with some other cell varieties — they already display inherent stem cell properties after isolation and, with their acquired neuronal properties, Muse cells spontaneously home toward the stroke-damaged sites.Adult stem cells vs embryos in treatment of macular degeneration: Medical Xpress reports optimistically on Canadians using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to treat age-related macular degeneration, a common cause of blindness in the elderly. Researchers in Montreal got most of the ESCs to differentiate into pure cones, at least in a dish. But David Levin in another article on Medical Xpress points out that stem cells from adult dental pulp can also be used to treat macular degeneration. Researchers from Tufts University are finding that these cells from a patient’s own teeth can be reprogrammed into the same retinal tissue the Canadians are making from ESCs. In fact, traits of dental pulp stem cells avoid some of the complications and safety concerns of other induced pluripotent stem cells. Both techniques are in the early stages, but why not focus on the adult stem cells and avoid the ethical quandaries of using embryonic stem cells?Scientists reveal how stem cells defend against viruses (PhysOrg): The only article in recent news describing scientific progress in the use of human embryos for stem cells is this study from Singapore. It’s about basic research into how stem cells protect themselves from viruses.  No treatments are described for any health conditions, and nothing about the research suggests that similar processes protect adult stem cells.  Is there any reason, then, to use embryos for this research instead of adult stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells?Many researchers were delighted to find that induced pluripotent stem cells from adult tissues work just as well as embryonic stem cells. Most of them saw the new gold rush in adult cells, and were relieved to avoid the ethical quandaries. But there are still holdouts who want to tinker with the unborn. Pressure needs to be kept on them about the evil of using embryos and fetal tissues.  Those unethical practices feed the market for abortions (9/20/15, 8/02/15, 7/18/15). These news items undercut the claim that scientists “need” embryos to “help” people.  A multi-pronged attack might dry up that market: (1) embryos are not needed, (2) the smart money is on adult stem cells, and (3) cutting up human embryos at any stage is unethical and immoral.  Secular materialists who won’t be impressed by #3 may listen to #1 and #2.last_img read more

SouthAfrica.info Mobile

first_imgStay connected wherever you are with our new mobile version of SouthAfrica.info.m.southafrica.infoSurfing SouthAfrica.info Mobile is easy: simply go to your phone’s web browser, type in m.southafrica.info, and press “OK” or “Go”.Web-enabling your phoneMost new cellphones are already set up for mobile internet access or WAP (wireless application protocol). If yours is not, you can set it up by following these simple steps (for South African mobile subscribers):VodacomDial *111# from your phone, choose “device setup” and follow the prompts to download the WAP settings to your phone. Alternatively, you can register for Vodacom4me. See Vodacom’s mobile data page. If you still need help, dial Vodacom customer service on 155 from a Vodacom mobile or 082 155 from any other phone.MTNDial *123# from your phone, and select the option to have the WAP settings sent to your cellphone by SMS. When you receive the SMS, all you have to do is select the option to save the settings. See MTN’s WAP FAQ. If you still need help, dial MTN customer service on 173 from your mobile.Cell CSMS SMARTDATA to 084 115 9911 (costs R2) to get set up, or go to Cell C’s mobile internet services page. If you still need help, dial Cell C customer service on 084 140 from your mobile.Virgin MobileOn your handset menu, find the Virgin Mobile menu. It normally appears on the first page of the menu, or under “Applications”. Then choose the option called “Virgin Settings”, and after a few minutes you’ll receive two SMS messages with the settings. Open the messages, select “Save” from the menu, and you’re done. See Virgin Mobile’s data services page. If you still need help, dial Virgin Mobile customer service on 0741 000 123.How much will it cost me?Mobile internet browsing is relatively inexpensive. Remember: you’re not paying for a call, or for the length of time you’re connected. You’re only paying for the data you download. So once you’ve downloaded a web page, you can read it at your leisure – you only start paying again if/when you download another page.last_img read more

Gift of The Givers Plays its Part in Makhanda (Grahamstown)

first_imgA nation that takes care of its destitute, is a nation that instils in its people the ethos of active citizenship, of Ubuntu. This echo true for the citizens of Makhanda (Grahamstown) who reached out to Gift of the Givers for over the water crisis faced in the area.Settlers Dam is at 13%, water cannot be extracted from the last 10% due to high silt levels, effectively it has 3% reserves. Waainek Water Treatment Works that receives water from the very much smaller Howiesons Poort Dam had a problem with its pumping capacity due to electrical failure recently and was out of service for a few days.However, with rapidly dropping water levels in HP Dam, the Waainek Water Works will essentially shutdown. It supplies the West of the town with 8 Megaliters per day. The only feasible option is the James Kleynhans Water Works which is also compromised currently. It receives water from the Glen Melville Dam which in turn receives water from the Orange-Fish River scheme. But recent high content of mud that was released into the dam from the Fish River necessitated shutting down the pumps to allow for the mud to settle.Currently 80000 people in parts of Makhanda east and 19 streets in Makhanda West are without water. The municipality and residents are using water tankers and bottled water to compensate but the shortfall is huge.Days after the cry for help by the Makhanda community, the Gift of the Givers called on citizens across the country to assist. Dr Gideon Groenewald, Gift of the Givers specialist hydrologist, geologist, palaentologist, engaged the municipality to see what sustainable alternatives could be found in the immediate to medium term as work continues to double the capacity of the James Kleynhans Water Works to 20 Megalitres by 2020.On the 13th February 2019, distribution of water and siting of boreholes took place. There were jubilant shouts of “amanzi”, with faces beaming in disbelief as people ran towards the Gift of the Givers trucks entering Grahamstown. Nine days of no water, nine days of desperation. The crowds, including many university students, gathered outside the municipality eagerly awaiting whatever they could get. Our teams commenced delivery whilst Dr Gideon Groenewald, Gift of the Givers hydrologist, briefed the media on the drought issue.Dr Groenewald gave the municipality an in-depth presentation on various aspects of the drought with specific solution-oriented options focusing on boreholes as an immediate intervention for medium to long term relief.After the presentation, Gift of the Givers teams distributed water in the water starved communities whilst Dr Groenewald commenced his “search” for underground water.A special thank you to the magnificent team work, co-operation and commitment of the Municipality, SAPS, SANDF, RTI, volunteers and the community and a special thanks to generous South Africans.Contributions can still be made into Gift of the Givers, Standard Bank, Account Number 052137228, Branch Code 057525, ref. Drought, will be accepted. To obtain Section 18A tax benefit certificate please send proof of payment to [email protected] toll-free on 0800786911. Visit our website and Facebook page for updates.last_img read more

Matt Saal, Aug. 7

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It has been beautiful weather so far in August and the end of July. We are going to make third cutting on Monday. Just looking at other people’s third cutting it looks pretty typical. It doesn’t look like there is going to be a lot of volume there but the quality looks good.The second cutting yields were good. We haven’t tested any of the quality yet but I think it will be pretty normal for second cutting, which usually isn’t very good. It is usually the worst of the four cuttings.We chopped it and covered it and we won’t do anything more until we get ready to start feeding it. When we get ready to feed it, we’ll test it for moisture protein digestibility and all of those things.Driving around the county there is a lot of good looking corn and a lot of rough looking corn. It is all based on drainage, when they got the rains and how much they got. The agronomists have been talking about diseases and the airplanes have been flying over corn fields, so there have been some fungicides applied. The leaf diseases are not much of a problem for us with silage. If we get the mold and the fungi that grow on the ear, then that stays with it when it goes into the silo and will show up as a toxin in the feed.The soybeans could actually use a drink of water around here. The yards around here are starting to dry up and turn brown. Other places have gotten rains but we have not had a significant rain in a couple of weeks right around here. There is some corn on the outside rows of fields that look a little stressed, but I don’t see much of that yet.last_img read more