Student Tent City to Focus on Homeless Experience

first_imgBURLINGTON, Vt.Champlain College students plan to spend the week of Nov. 17-21 learning about what conditions are like for a growing number of families and individuals who have lost their home. Some 180 students have already made the commitment to sleep in tents on the Aiken green on campus and attend workshops and seminars to learn about social services and the underlying reasons related to homelessness. A series of workshops and lectures will also explore the issue throughout the week.The fourth annual Tent City is being held during the national observance of Hunger and Homeless Awareness Week, according to Ashley George, service coordinator for the Center for Service and Civic Engagement at Champlain College. Each year, the week before Thanksgiving, the National Coalition for the Homeless (www.nationalhomeless.org) helps to organize events across the country to take part in a nationwide effort to bring greater awareness to the problems of hunger and homelessness.We are working hard this year to emphasize the educational aspect of Tent City. We are not trying to simulate being homeless, but rather to raise the overall awareness of our students, staff and faculty about the challenges people are facing in these economic times, George explained. This year, more students signed up to spend a night or more in the tent city on the campus Aiken Green than in year’s past, George noted, and organizers had to limited the number of overnight participants to 60 students per night. Students will also be able to experience a typical soup kitchen menu at the dining hall with a limited menu similar to those often served in homeless shelters and food shelves. Events like this are tremendously important to helping the community understand the issues of homeless people, said Deb Bouton of the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS). We can’t do the work we do without the support of the community and an event like this one by Champlain College students is amazing. Bouton said COTS is already facing long waiting lists for shelter space for families and individuals and expects the need to grow as winter weather arrives. A series of workshops and seminars will complement the Tent City experience, George said. There will also be a fund-raising aspect to the weeks event with students collecting donations to help the Committee on Temporary Shelter with its community programs. Last year, students raised nearly $2,500 for COTS. Champlain College Tent City guest speakers every evening at 8 p.m.: Monday, Nov. 17: Former Champlain College students will talk about planning the first Tent City. Tuesday, Nov. 18: The Poverty Wall, an interactive activity will explore the stereotypes that surround people who are homeless. Wednesday, Nov. 19: Patrick De Leon, the drop in Coordinator at Spectrum Youth and Family Services, will speak about youth homelessness issues in Vermont. Thursday, Nov. 20: A panel of staff and clients from COTS (Committee on Temporary Shelter) will speak about the experiences of individuals and families who are homeless in Vermont. What are the real barriers to housing in Burlington and in Vermont? There will also be time for questions and comments at the end. A candle light vigil on Aiken green will directly follow the speakers at 9 p.m.Champlain College Tent City daytime activities and workshops: Monday, Nov. 17, 2 to 3:30 p.m. in Hauke Lounge Social Service Office- Mock intake procedure, anyone is welcome to come meet with a social worker to experience the process of applying for food stamps, Section 8 housing, and other services. Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2 to 3 p.m., meet at Tent City on Aiken green – Walk to COTS Shelters, students will walk to one of the COTS family shelters as well as the daytime and overnight shelters for Individuals. Wednesday, Nov. 19, 1 to 2 p.m. in Hauke Lounge Staff from the Vermont Workers Center will come to discuss issues such as Healthcare and Livable Wage and how they impact people that are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. Thursday, Nov. 20, noon at the Tower Room at the IDX Student Life Center, Brown Bag Lunch focusing on poverty and homelessness with a guest speaker from COTS. This event is sponsored by The Office of Diversity and Inclusion.All events are free and open to the public. To learn more, contact Service Coordinator Ashley George at the Center for Service and Civic Engagement at Champlain College, (802) 383-6632. Or by email at ageorge@champlain.edu. To learn more about COTS, visit www.cotsonline.org or call 864-7402. Champlain College was founded in 1878 and currently has nearly 2,000 undergraduate students. To learn more about Champlain College, visit www.champlain.edulast_img read more

Viola M. Zeigler, 86

first_imgViola M. Zeigler, 86, Greensburg, Indiana, passed away on Thursday, February 18, 2016 at the Aspen Place Health Campus in Greensburg.Born June 23, 1929 in Greensburg, she was the daughter of Daniel L. and Eva I. (White) Ogden.Viola graduated from Greensburg High School. She was a member of the First Baptist Church and the Greensburg Country Club. She had worked for over 20 years at Bohn Aluminum, then for several years as a police dispatcher for the Greensburg Police Department, and she then worked for a few years as a receptionist at the Greensburg Multi Specialty Clinic until her retirement.She was married to Robert D. Zeigler on October 4, 1947 and he preceded her in death on August 24, 1994.She is survived by one daughter, Marcia (Arthur J.) Barnes, Greensburg; three brothers, Norman Thomas Ogden, Greensburg, Paul P. Ogden, Greensburg, Gerald Ogden, Polk City, FL; three granddaughters, Kimberly (Jon) Porter, Laura (Andrew) Reiger, Lisa (Charles) Fogg; seven great grandchildren, Mary Kate, Emma, and Rebekah Porter, James Andrew and Grace Elizabeth Reiger, Adam Clinton and Sarah Valentina Fogg,She was preceded in death by her parents, husband; four brothers, Robert, Carl, Charles and Harold “Eddie” Ogden; two sisters, Eva Deloris Voiles and Dorothy Huber.Visitation will be held on Sunday from 1 to 4:00 p.m. at the Porter-Oliger-Pearson Funeral Home in Greensburg.Funeral Services will be held at 11:00 a.m. on Monday, February 22, 2016 at the funeral home with Rev. Jon Porter and Rev. Greg Redd officiating.Interment will be held in the Kingston Cemetery.Memorials may be made to the Samaritans Purse.Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

Leising congratulates New Horizons on 50-years at the Statehouse

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — Republican state senator from Oldenburg Jean Leising recently met with New Horizons Rehabilitation Inc. at the Statehouse.  New Horizons Rehabilitation Inc., a nonprofit organization that offers care and support for residents living with intellectual and developmental disabilities in southeast Indiana, was honored by Gov. Holcomb for its more than 50 years of business in Ripley County.last_img

State funding for early education restored but services this year could still

first_imgFrommherz said she and her staff are working to open all classrooms in September, but it will be a scramble. Reinstating bus services will be a particular challenge, she said, because they’ve already gotten out of their contracts. “Plans have been put in place that it’s hard to walk back from, because this was such a disruption,” she said. Juneau School District had hoped to add preschool classrooms this year. But with the start of the school year just around the corner, superintendent Bridget Weiss said that’s off the table for now. Amber Frommherz, director of Tlingit & Haida’s Head Start program, pictured in one of five Juneau Head Start classrooms on July 24, 2019. (Photo by Zoe Grueskin/KTOO) Gov. Mike Dunleavy agreed Tuesday to restore funding for early education in Alaska. But educators in Juneau say that even with funding back in place, services this year could be affected. But if it’s too late to add an entire preschool classroom, Weiss said the restored state funding gives the district more room to expand services in other ways. That could include more full-day and after-school preschool programs. Weiss said those changes could happen this school year. Tlingit and Haida Head Start director Amber Frommherz said the funding reversal is good news — but it’s not yet certain if all services will be restored. The Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska, which operates 15 Head Start classrooms around Southeast, planned to respond to those cuts by closing three classrooms and discontinuing bus services. “It’s very disruptive to the system to try to do that and find a teacher and move forward right now with expanding a classroom,” Weiss said. In June, the governor vetoed nearly $9 million for Head Start and early learning programs from the state operating budget. The first day of preschool at Juneau schools is Aug. 27. Tlingit and Haida Head Start classrooms will open in early September.last_img read more