Vermont Yankee’s $60 million dilemma

first_img NRC makes Vermont Yankee license renewal official | Vermont … Mar 21, 2011 … In a letter dated March 21, 2011, US Nuclear Regulatory Senior Project Manager Robert Kuntz notified Michael Colomb, Entergy Vermont Yankee … Aug 27, 2002 … Vermont Yankee finally sold to Entergy by Robert Smith The deal had more than its share of up and down moments, but the sale of the Vermont … Northstar Vermont Yankee,By Kate Duffy, Vermont Business Magazine. Entergy Nuclear has a $60 million decision to make ‘ whether to invest in refueling Vermont Yankee, even though a federal judge refused to issue a preliminary injunction assuring the company it could continue operating the plant while its lawsuit against the state is pending. US District Court Judge J Garvan Murtha denied the request for a preliminary injunction in a decision issued Monday afternoon. He said Entergy failed to prove during a two-day hearing in June that it would suffer ‘irreparable harm’ before the case, schedule for trial in September, is decided.During the hearing, Entergy’s lawyers argued that without an injunction that would let it plan for future operations, the company may be forced to shut down the plant before its current license expires in March. It would be unlikely to make a $60 million investment in fuel rods without an indication from the court that it might win its case. ‘Entergy, while it has raised the possibility, has not persuaded the Court that a decision to shut down is likely and imminent,’ Judge Murtha wrote in the 18-page decision. Entergy is suing the state in federal court over whether a law that effectively gives the Legislature the right to shut down a licensed, operating nuclear power plant is constitutional. Vermont Yankee, the state’s only nuclear power plant, is slated to shut down on March 21, 2012, at the end of its original 40-year operating license. Citing the plant’s age and history of radioactive leaks, last year the Senate voted 26 to 4 not to allow the Public Service Board to issue a certificate of public good to let the plant operate beyond its scheduled shut-down. In March, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which regulates all of the nation’s 104 nuclear power reactors, approved a license extension that would allow the plant to continue generating power for another 20 years. Entergy says the plant is safe and reliable and should be allowed to continue operating. It had hoped a preliminary injunction would allow it to do so while the case is pending. Vermont Attorney General Bill Sorrell, a Democrat, said the state had won an important battle but still has a war to wage. ‘This was a nice win, but really what’s better is that the preliminary injunction was not issued,’ Sorrell said. ‘If one had been granted, that would have been a devastating blow to us because it would have required the finding by the judge, based on his understanding of the facts and the law, that it was likely that Entergy would prevail on the merits of the case as a result of the trial. We would have been really knocked backwards if that were the case.’ In ruling on the failure to prove irreparable harm, Judge Murtha did not address whether he thought Entergy could win its suit based on the merits of its case. ‘I was a little bit surprised that he so carefully skirted the merits,’ said Pat Parenteau, an attorney and professor at Vermont Law School who has been closely watching the case unfold. ‘He gave a few hints of what’s troubling him and things he wants to see addressed at trial. It’s like reading tea leaves in the opinion. But I was not at all surprised he found no irreparable harm.’ Parenteau noted it is extremely difficult to prove irreparable harm in a case like this. Instead, he noted the judge fast-tracked the case, scheduling the trial for September 12-14, in order to address the merits of the case and make a final decision. ‘The judge expressed no views whatsoever on the constitutional issues that Entergy has raised,’ Parenteau said. ‘Reading between the lines, what I see is a judge who believes the state has a right to close the plant for the proper reasons, but a judge who is not 100 percent convinced the state has done that.’ In a statement issued to reporters, Vermont Yankee spokesman Larry Smith said the company is ‘disappointed in the outcome.’ He made no indication of whether it will buy the fuel needed for the plant ‘ a decision he previously had said would have to be made by July 23. ‘Our request for a preliminary injunction was about keeping the plant’s workers employed, the plant running safely and the electric grid reliable until this case is resolved. In the upcoming days, we will be evaluating Judge Murtha’s opinion and assessing the company’s near-term options.’ RELATEDCourt denies preliminary injunction in Vermont Yankee caseThe Federal District Court for the District of Vermont issued a decision Monday evening in favor of the State of Vermont and denied Entergy’s request for a preliminary injunction that would have prevented the State from enforcing its laws during the pendency of the litigation. In a prepared statement, Attorney General William Sorrell called the decision ‘a very good first step in an important case.’  Mar 3, 2010 … Vermont Yankee engineers and technicians continue their investigation into the source of tritium in the plant’s groundwater.www.vermontbiz.com/node/14600 Vermont Yankee finally sold to Entergy | Vermont Business Magazine Vermont Yankee narrows search for tritium leak | Vermont Business …last_img read more

Indiana DNR: There is no such thing as ‘safe ice’

first_imgVersailles, In. — Indiana Conservation Officers are advising citizens across the Wabash Valley of the potential hazards of being on frozen lakes, ponds, rivers, and streams this winter.Recent temperatures in the Wabash Valley have brought about thin sheets of ice.Indiana Conservation Officers ask everyone to be vigilant and keep a watchful eye on neighborhood retention ponds, lakes and other waterways for those who may venture out and find themselves in trouble.Every winter, thousands of Hoosiers safely enjoy fishing, skating, hiking, or just sliding around on frozen ponds and lakes. And every year, people drown after falling through ice. Just like re-learning how to drive on snow versus clear roads, some Hoosiers need to re-learn how to safely have fun on ice.Conservation Officers want citizens to put safety first. Here are a few tips to remember when considering standing on or walking on a frozen lake or pond:No ice is safe ice.Test the thickness of the ice with an ice auger.  At least 4 inches of ice is recommended for ice fishing; 5 inches is recommended for snowmobiling.If you don’t know….don’t go.Wear life jackets or flotation coats.Carry ice hooks and rope gear.When on the ice, leave a note with a friend or family member of your whereabouts.Don’t test the thickness of the ice while alone.Indiana Conservation Officers say the best rule of thumb is, when walking on ice, to believe you are ‘walking on thin ice.’ Wearing a life jacket is especially important when on the ice. If you fall through, a life jacket will keep your head above the water until help arrives.“Ice is beginning to form on smaller bodies of water. We would like to ask that the community keep a close eye out for children in your area who may play on the ice. It takes extreme low temperatures and quite some time to form several inches of ice. We have not had those conditions in the Wabash Valley this winter,” said Indiana Conservation Officer Max Winchell.If you see a pet or other animal in distress on the ice, please do not venture on the ice after it.  This can often end in tragedy.  Contact your local emergency response personnel who are equipped to make a rescue on thin ice.Some bodies of water will appear to be frozen solid but actually can have thin ice in several unsuspecting areas. Flowing water, such as rivers and streams, should be avoided when covered by a layer of ice. Water that is surrounded by sand may freeze with inconsistencies in the thickness of the ice.Underground springs, wind, waterfowl and other animals can also keep areas of ice thin.last_img read more

Real Estate Transactions: August 3 – 7

first_imgAugust 7, Edna W. Barry sold 22 Larsen Lane to Rowa LLC and Whitney Swolinzky for $927,835.EDGARTOWNAugust 5, Hugo A. Acuna and Gwendolyn J. Acuna sold 14 Pulpit Lane to Mark R. Gambardella and Susan P. Gambardella for $1,500,000.August 7, Ellen Williams Bender, trustee of Williams Pease Point Trust, sold 7 Pease’s Point Way to Edward N. Williams and Megan H. Williams for $2,000,000. August 7, Joan C. Solomon and Arthur H. Solomon, trustees of the Amended & Restated Joan C. Solomon Revocable Trust, sold 25 Old Dunham’s Corner Way to Jacqueline Friedman for $1,295,000.August 7, Joseph M. Frio Jr. and Debra J. Frio, trustees of the Frio Family Nominee Trust, sold 33 Codman Spring Road to Robert A. Robinson and Meaghan E. Hughes for $795,000.OAK BLUFFSAugust 3, Dianne M. Lynch sold 20 Vineyard Ave. to Christopher M. Lynch and Raquel M. Rodriquez, trustees of L & R Realty Trust, for $90,000. CHILMARKAugust 4, Christopher John Atkinson IV and Florencia Louise Ferrari sold 138 South Road to Scott Ferrari and Florencia Louise Ferrari for $360,000.center_img August 5, Carol S. Lewis and Walter M. Lewis, trustees of Lewis Family Living Trust, sold 7 Goode St. to Lindsey Sawyer and Edward Nelson Sawyer for $825,000.August 6, George Zagrafos, trustee of MVY Paddock Realty Trust, sold 28 Paddock Road to 28 Paddock Road LLC for $625,000.August 7, David Diriwachter and Deirdre Bohan sold 43 Vineyard Ave. to Nickolas W. Peters, trustee of 43 Vineyard Avenue Realty Trust, for $135,000.August 7, Island Dream Properties LLC sold 21 Paddock Road to William A. Borden and Terri P. Borden, trustees of MV Cabana 21 Realty Trust, for $600,000.TISBURYAugust 3, David A. Behnke and Paul F. Doherty sold 117 William St. to Peter W. Fink, trustee of 117 William Street Nominee Trust, for $3,200,000.August 7, Morris Flam and Pamela B. Flam sold 47 North William St. to Ellen B. Kaplan for $1,500,000.WEST TISBURYAugust 4, Ann K. Nelson and Robert Marshall, trustees of Ann K. Nelson Realty Trust, sold Lot 1, 20 Edson Forrest Road, to David A. Behnke and Paul F. Doherty, trustees of Behnke-Doherty Realty Trust, for $1,750,000.last_img read more

Kentucky School Surprises Student with Yearbook Photo of Her Service Dog

first_img“It’s important for us to do all we can to foster our relationship with families and do what we can to support students,” says Nathan Sturtzel, principal of St. Patrick Catholic School. “We love Ariel. She’s part of Hadley Jo’s family so she’s a part of our family too. Finding a place for her in our yearbook was an easy decision and it was a lot of fun to include her. We loved it.”The Labradoodle is the only service dog within the archdiocese of Louisville, according to Heather Lange.“When I got the yearbook and saw that they included our service dog, that was one of the most touching moments of my life. The inclusiveness meant so much,” she adds. “It proved that we may not all look the same, we may not all learn the same, we have differences but it’s OK. We can still be kind and inclusive and accept each other. This yearbook is a huge reflection of that.”She went on to say, “It’s very comforting knowing my daughter has a home at her school where she is loved and accepted, even though she may not look like everyone else. St. Patrick made a choice to accept my child and her service dog. The acceptance and inclusion is a true sign of kindness and compassion.” Photo courtesy: Heather Lange via CNN With the academic year coming to an end, one school in Kentucky decided to save a spot in its yearbook for a different kind of student – Ariel, a service dog.St. Patrick Catholic School in Louisville surprised the pet’s owner, 7-year-old Hadley Jo Lange, by including a photo of the Labradoodle among its kindergarten class. The girl suffers from epilepsy, which is a neurological disorder that causes seizures.“This dog has really saved my daughter’s life,” her mom, Heather Lange, told CNN. “I don’t know how I could ever thank Ariel as a mother. She goes with her everywhere, to school, rides the bus with her, goes to her dance classes and soccer practice. She always has her eyes on my little girl. It’s a huge sense of security.”The 4-year-old pooch can recognize when the child is having an episode. When the seizures happen at school, Ariel alerts teachers by barking. During the episodes, she also lies down next to Hadley Jo and moves her body underneath the child in order to cushion her fall.last_img read more