Binnie ‘happy’ with overall performance

first_imgKINGSTON:Jamaican and Caribbean men’s champion Chris Binnie finished second at the TRAC North of Scotland Professional Squash Association tournament which wrapped up on Sunday in Aberdeen, Scotland.Although unseeded, Binnie fought his way to the final, beating Richie Fallows of England 11-9, 3-11, 11-2, 11-8 in the first round, and Fallows’ teammate Joe Green 6-11, 12-10, 11-9, 11-4 in the quarter-finals.In the semi-finals Binnie rallied from a first game loss to beat Englishman Eddie Charlton, ranked 65 in the world, 4-11, 11-7, 11-4, 11-7.However, the Jamaican’s winning streak ended in the final, as he went down 4-11, 4-11, 7-11 to Yousseff Soliman of Egypt.”Although I’m disappointed that I lost in the final I am very happy about my performance throughout the week as it will improve my ranking,” said Binnie.The national and regional champion is heading to Switzerland to compete in the Pilatus Cup, which starts tomorrow.”There were many positives to take away from doing well in Scotland and I’ll be working for an even better result in Switzerland,” said Binnie.last_img read more

East Bay native who played for Jets, 49ers passes away

first_imgHayward native Ed Galigher, who starred in three sports at Chabot College before he went on to play seven seasons in the NFL, including two with the 49ers, died Tuesday after experiencing complications following a double lung transplant procedure. He was 68.Galigher had the procedure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, according to longtime friend Zack Papachristos, but suffered complications after surgery.Galigher was born in Hayward and graduated in 1968 from Sunset High School, …last_img

Peppered Moths Without Evolution

first_imgA new study shows that scientific research on moth camouflage does not require evolutionary theory.Evolutionary biologists from Seoul, South Korea filmed moths resting on tree trunks.  According to PhysOrg, they were trying to understand how moths in the wild orient themselves on the bark for greatest camouflage.  That’s a very different question than the ones asked by Kettlewell, Majerus and other past researchers who were looking for natural selection of peppered moths.  In those old studies, camouflage was a happenstance, not a behavior within the moth.  The opening paragraph referred to the old ideas as if preparing to dismiss them:Moths are iconic examples of camouflage. Their wing coloration and patterns are shaped by natural selection to match the patterns of natural substrates, such as a tree bark or leaves, on which the moths rest. But, according to recent findings, the match in the appearance was not all in their invisibility… Despite a long history of research on these iconic insects, whether moths behave in a way to increase their invisibility has not been determined.In other words, Kettlewell and Majerus didn’t take into account the moths’ behavior.  They treated moths as passive creatures that would alight on tree trunks at random.  They placed the selective power in the environment, with lower contrast producing greater camouflage, leaving the high-contrast moths vulnerable to birds.The South Korean researchers found, instead, that moth behavior plays a vital role in the camouflage.  They “found out that moths are walking on the tree bark until they settle down for resting; the insects seem to actively search for a place and a body position that makes them practically invisible.”  A video clip embedded in the article shows the moths doing this.To determine whether this final spot indeed made the moth really invisible, the researchers photographed each moth at its landing spot (initial spot) and at the final spot at which the moth decided to rest. Next, the researchers asked people to try to locate the moth from the photograph as quickly as possible. People had more difficulty finding the moths at their final spots than the same moths at their initial landing spots. Amazingly, this was even true for the species (Hypomecis roboraria) that only changed its resting spot on the tree bark without changing its body orientation. Therefore, the researchers concluded, that moths seems to actively choose the spot that makes them invisible to predators. How do they know how to become invisible? The research team is now trying to answer this question as the next step.The only mentions of evolution in the article concerned (1) the researchers calling themselves” evolutionary biologists,” (2) the fact that they work at the Laboratory of Behavioral Ecology and Evolution at the Seoul National University, and (3) their research being published in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology.  The abstract of that paper seemed very cautious about inferring evolution, stating: “Our study demonstrates that the evolution of morphological adaptations, such as colour pattern of moths, cannot be fully understood without taking into account a behavioural phenotype that coevolved with the morphology for increasing the adaptive value of the morphological trait.”  While this suggests the authors are proposing coevolution of behavior with camouflage, the statement is a backhanded swipe at earlier evolutionary research that neglected behavior.Speaking of moths, Live Science posted an interesting list of “7 Things You Don’t Know About Moths, But Should.”  These include their importance as pollinators, their role in the food chain for many other animals, and the males’ ability to smell females from seven miles away.  If we could get over the yuck factor, we might even find their caterpillars a nutritious superfood, meeting the minimum daily requirements of several important nutrients.  Moths are a sister family to butterflies in the Order Lepidoptera, and share many of the same characteristics.This story underscores the uselessness of evolutionary theory.  For decades, evolutionary biologists have strained at moths and swallowed camels.  They watched the simple things, like how closely a moth’s wings match tree bark, but ignored the weightier matters of moth complexity.  Those little flying things circling the lights in your backyard are astoundingly complex machines: they have compound eyes with hundreds of facets, jointed appendages, digestive systems, reproductive systems, navigation systems, communication systems, flight systems – all packed within their tiny, lightweight bodies.Even tougher on evolutionary theory, they undergo metamorphosis – a complete transformation of body plan three times in their lifecycle: egg to caterpillar, then caterpillar to pupa or chrysalis, then chrysalis to adult flying insect.  This is shown exquisitely in Illustra’s beautiful film Metamorphosis, which ends with sound reasons why Darwinism cannot explain these abilities.Yet for decades, evolutionists were obsessed with finding an example of natural selection in one species of moth, whether it landed on light or dark tree trunks.  And now we are told by the South Korean researchers that “evolution of morphological adaptations, such as colour pattern of moths, cannot be fully understood without taking into account a behavioural phenotype” – in other words, you cannot just play “Pin the Peppered Moth on the Tree Trunk.”  You have to watch what a living peppered moth does after it lands.  If Kettlewell had simply kept his grubby evolutionary hands off the moths, he might have found dark moths walking on a light-barked tree trunk looking for a better place to blend in, and vice versa.  More likely, the moths would be too smart to land on a high-contrast surface in the first place.Trying to invoke “coevolution” as a magic word is folly.  It means that evolutionists have to invoke a second miracle: first, the match between wing coloration and tree trunks, and second, the ability of the moth to actively search out and select a suitable spot for camouflage.  What causes that behavior?  The researchers have no idea.  As usual, they use the futureware escape trick: “more research is needed.”  The article said they are clueless: “How do they know how to become invisible?  The research team is now trying to answer this question as the next step.” Save a step: ask a creationist. 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Breaking: ESPN Shutting Down Grantland Effective Immediately

first_imgESPN promotion for Grantland Sports.Grantland/ESPNUpdate 2: Simmons has weighed in on the situation. He called the treatment of his former colleagues “simply appalling.”I loved everyone I worked with at G and loved what we built. Watching good/kind/talented people get treated so callously = simply appalling.— Bill Simmons (@BillSimmons) October 30, 2015Update: According to James Andrew Miller, all of Grantland’s writers will have their contracts honored. Furthermore, the network “intends” to use the sports writers on other platforms.All @Grantland33 writers will have their contracts honored; intent is to use sports writers on other @espn platforms.— James Andrew Miller (@JimMiller) October 30, 2015 espn grantland shut downGrantland/ESPNEarlier: ESPN sports and pop-culture blog Grantland, which was founded back in 2011 by former employee Bill Simmons, is being shut down by the network. Simmons parted ways with ESPN back in May, and Chris Connelly had been in charge since.The Worldwide Leader announced the news Friday via the following statement:Effective immediately we are suspending the publication of Grantland.  After careful consideration, we have decided to direct our time and energy going forward to projects that we believe will have a broader and more significant impact across our enterprise.Grantland distinguished itself with quality writing, smart ideas, original thinking and fun.  We are grateful to those who made it so.  Bill Simmons was passionately committed to the site and proved to be an outstanding editor with a real eye for talent.  Thanks to all the other writers, editors and staff who worked very hard to create content with an identifiable sensibility and consistent intelligence and quality. We also extend our thanks to Chris Connelly who stepped in to help us maintain the site these past five months as he returns to his prior role.Despite this change, the legacy of smart long-form sports story-telling and innovative short form video content will continue, finding a home on many of our other ESPN platforms.Reaction has been pouring in from many in the industry. ESPN’s handling of @Grantland33 and its staff post-Simmons has been, to be blunt, a train wreck. That staff deserved much better.— Richard Deitsch (@richarddeitsch) October 30, 2015Writing seemed to be on the wall the past few weeks, but still a major bummer nonetheless https://t.co/d9qJlNpTbK— Ben Axelrod (@BenAxelrod) October 30, 2015.@Grantland33 gave some of my favorite writers a chance to do whatever the hell they wanted to do for a long time. That’s great.— HALLRAISER (@edsbs) October 30, 2015The decision to end @Grantland33 was a very recent one according to sources at @espn— James Andrew Miller (@JimMiller) October 30, 2015I have read Grantland every day since launch. There is going to be an real hole in my life with it gone. I’m so sorry for everyone involved.— Will Leitch (@williamfleitch) October 30, 2015More as we learn it.last_img read more

Report: Tennessee’s Marquez North Not Enrolled In Classes For Spring Semester

first_imgMarquez North of Tennessee Injured.Marquez North Tennessee Injury RumorMarquez North did not live up to expectations as a junior, catching only six passes in seven games this season, but he still may have played his last game in Knoxville. According to the Knoxville News Sentinel, Tennessee spokesman Ryan Robinson confirmed that North is not enrolled at UT this semester. While it has not been confirmed that he will test the NFL Draft waters, one would assume that is the move for North now. Beat writer Dustin Dopirak shared more on Friday.… Obviously, others have reported that North has hired an agent and entered the draft. We have not been able to confirm that.— Dustin Dopirak (@TennesseeBeat) January 15, 2016Tennessee athletics has said repeatedly all this week that it does not know North’s plans.— Dustin Dopirak (@TennesseeBeat) January 15, 2016His high school coach, Mike Palmieri, told me last night he hadn’t heard anything about North leaving.— Dustin Dopirak (@TennesseeBeat) January 15, 2016But right now, the one thing we can say definitively is that North is not enrolled for the spring semester.— Dustin Dopirak (@TennesseeBeat) January 15, 2016One more note on North, just so you guys know I’m trying. The NFL doesn’t release the names of underclass draft entrants for another week…— Dustin Dopirak (@TennesseeBeat) January 15, 2016… and it won’t confirm or deny any players who have declared before that time.— Dustin Dopirak (@TennesseeBeat) January 15, 2016North’s apparent decision to leave college is a strange one. He does have the size to be a big target at that level—he’s listed at 6-foot-3, 229 pounds—but the production wasn’t anywhere near what was expected out of him. We should know more about this situation in the coming days.[KnoxNews.com]last_img read more

Fighter jets over Nunavut

first_imgAPTN National NewsCanada’s fighter jets are once again roaring in the skies over Nunavut.It’s all part of Operation Nanook.The federal government is hoping that an increased military presence in the area will strengthen their sovereignty claims in the Arctic.APTN National News reporter Wayne Rivers met up with one young pilot and files this report.last_img

Marc Gasol Is Joel Embiids Kryptonite

To put it another way: Against average competition, Embiid rivals Stephen Curry, Giannis Antetokounmpo and James Harden as the most prolific scorer in basketball in terms of points per 100 possessions. But when he’s guarded by Gasol, he essentially turns into Dewayne Dedmon.At 7 feet tall and 250 pounds, Embiid can usually bully smaller defenders and tactically position himself in the post. But Gasol is too big to be pushed around, and it’s forcing Embiid out of his sweet spots. Throughout the series, Gasol has refused to cede ground to Embiid, denying the entry pass into the post and forcing Embiid to catch the ball outside of the paint. During the regular season, Embiid averaged 7.4 touches in the paint per game. Against Gasol and Toronto in the playoffs, Embiid is averaging just 4.2 touches in the paint per game.Another factor contributing to Embiid’s lack of paint touches is the crowd that’s been forming right around the basket. Fellow Sixer Ben Simmons can’t shoot outside of 10 feet and so positions himself near the rim, which brings his defender to effectively provide help defense when Embiid is in the post. That’s a problem especially when the help defender is Kawhi Leonard, the player who has guarded Simmons most of the series.To make up for his lack of paint touches, Embiid has had to rely on his jump shot to generate points. But that’s not his strong suit. In the regular season, Embiid shot 34 percent on jumpers. In this series, he’s just 10 for 37 (27 percent) on those shots. Gasol is forcing Embiid to do what he does least well, and it’s working to the Raptors’ advantage.The fact that Gasol has given Embiid trouble shouldn’t be all that surprising. Even at 34 years old, Gasol can still play like the defensive player of the year he once was. Just ask Nikola Vucevic: Gasol neutralized the All-Star center during the Raptors’ first-round series against the Magic. Vucevic scored just 17 points per 100 possessions when Gasol was the primary defender — a far cry from Vucevic’s season average of 32 points per 100 possessions.When Gasol was brought to Toronto in a midseason trade, it was reasonable to wonder whether the big Spaniard had enough in the tank to make a difference on a contending team. Those doubts have been put to rest, in part because Gasol has chiseled out a perfect role for himself. In Toronto, Gasol doesn’t need to anchor a defense while also serving as a primary scorer, like he was forced to do in Memphis. Instead, he’s able to focus on what he does best, which is lock down the opposing team’s best big man.In all fairness to Embiid, he’s reportedly battled through injury on top of illness during the playoffs. And if we’ve learned anything from his monster Game 3, it’s that a healthy Embiid can live up to his self-proclaimed title. The only question is whether he can do it consistently against an elite defensive stopper like Gasol.Check out our latest NBA predictions. Joel Embiid has described himself as the “most unstoppable player in the league” — and for good reason. When he’s at his best, like in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference semifinals, he can make defenders look downright foolish as he pump-fakes his way into windmill dunks. But so far in Philadelphia’s series against Toronto, Game 3 has been the exception. The Raptors have all but shut Embiid down on the offensive end, thanks in large part to Marc Gasol — the man who has perfected the art of stopping the league’s most unstoppable player.Through five games of the series — which the Raptors lead 3-2 — Gasol has matched up with Embiid on 201 possessions, holding him to just 21 points per 100 possessions. That’s a significant dip from Embiid’s season average of 37 points per 100 possessions.If you think those numbers are obscured by Embiid’s recent upper respiratory problem, consider this: Over the past two seasons (which is as far back as the NBA’s matchup data goes), Gasol has played against Embiid on nine separate occasions (including the regular season and this year’s playoffs). During that stretch, the two have matched up on a total of 379 possessions. Embiid averages just 19 points per 100 possessions when Gasol is his primary defender, by far his lowest average against anyone who has guarded him on at least 100 possessions. read more

Opinion Ohio State mens hockey blew it

Ohio State sophomore goalie Tommy Nappier goes down on one knee during the Buckeyes’ game against Michigan State on March 1. Ohio State won 5-1. Credit: Nick Hudak | For The LanternThe date is Oct. 8. Ohio State men’s hockey comes in at No. 1 in the USCHO.com poll before even playing a game this season.The Buckeyes bring the vast majority of their talent back from the season before, a season where they stunned college hockey on the way to making a Frozen Four run, the second in the program’s history.Sure, Ohio State loses Matthew Weis, the third-best scorer on the team, but Weis was injured throughout the entirety of the NCAA tournament, so the players coming back are well aware of their ability to make it without him.Ohio State loses a strong defenseman in Janik Moser, as well as some solid depth players in Christian Lampasso, Kevin Miller and Luke Stork. But it brings back much, much more.The date is Feb. 9. Ohio State is the No. 2 team in the country on the back of a seven-game win streak, and is playing up to the lofty expectations put before it.Then it all went up in smoke.For a team that had all the talent, all the experience and all the core pieces it needed to not only get back to the Frozen Four, but win it, all it took for Ohio State to throw it all away was losing the chip on its shoulder that it had through the past three seasons.Growing complacent after all but sealing both the Big Ten and their tournament bid, the Buckeyes went 1-6-1 in their final eight games, looking like a shell of their former selves.In 2017, Ohio State squeaked its way into the tournament, a major win for the program in its own right, then took the eventual NCAA runner-up to overtime before falling 3-2.In 2018, the Buckeyes squeaked its way into a No. 1 seed, were still considered the underdog in their region and proceeded to put a beatdown on Denver, the reigning national champions, before losing to the team that would eventually win the tournament.Both of those losses were to Minnesota Duluth. Ohio State would have had to make the final for the potential to play the Bulldogs for a third time.Anyone who watched this team the past six weeks knew that was not going to happen.Through losing six of its final eight games, Ohio State’s consistent offense went missing, its’ even more consistent defense and goaltending turned to swiss cheese and the motivation that was evident throughout the locker room to win the whole thing turned from action to simply words.It seemed the Buckeyes found their wake-up call in the Big Ten tournament, getting embarrassed as the No. 1 seed by Penn State in a 5-1 beatdown on Ohio State’s home ice.Captain and senior forward Mason Jobst saw the lack of drive from his team that day. He thought Ohio State could flip the switch come NCAA tournament time.“If [Penn State] lost tonight, their season was actually over, and as much as I hate to say, maybe we didn’t have that desperation because we kind of knew that we were in the tournament,” Jobst said. “Now, as a senior class, the true desperation is gonna come out … our lives are on the line every single game from here on out.”Ohio State dropped to a No. 3 seed because of its’ late-season struggles, and got a rematch with Denver in the first round, a year after beating the Pioneers 5-1 to advance to the Frozen Four.Denver had the chip on its shoulder the Buckeyes had for the past two seasons. That was gone now, and the Pioneers came out with a 2-0 victory, officially eliminating Ohio State, ruining the program’s greatest chance to win a national championship it has ever had.The Buckeyes only have themselves to blame.The Denver-Ohio State game was a tight one, and one the Buckeyes certainly had a chance to win. Ohio State outshot the Pioneers 24-13, and only gave up one goal prior to pulling sophomore goalie Tommy Nappier.But that’s not really the point. The point is that Ohio State shouldn’t have had to play Denver again, and most certainly not in the first round.The date is March 30. Ohio State should be preparing for its’ second round matchup in the season that this program has dreamed about for the past four years since Jobst’s impressive freshman season, and likely for much longer before that.Instead, the players are forced to watch from afar, only left to think about what went so wrong so fast.Next year, the same high expectations likely won’t be there.Jobst is gone, leaving behind one of the greatest individual legacies the program has ever seen. Joining him is Big Ten Defensive Player of the Year Sasha Larocque, goalie Sean Romeo and key contributors like Dakota Joshua, Freddy Gerard, John Wiitala and Brendon Kearney.This was the year for Ohio State to win its’ first national title.Instead, it was bounced in the first round to a team it thoroughly outplayed a season ago.There was something special about that Frozen Four team in 2018, and it wasn’t necessarily the talent. But this year, with increased talent and increased expectation, the Buckeyes crumbled and faltered, leaving nothing but unknowns about if the players returning for next season can still pick up all the pieces. read more

Motorcyclist killed in a singlevehicle crash

first_imgMotorcyclist killed in a single-vehicle crash Posted: July 23, 2017 Jessica Ranck EL CAJON (KUSI) — A motorcyclist was killed Sunday in a single-vehicle traffic crash in unincorporated San Diego County, near El Cajon.The crash occurred a little after 4:30 a.m. in the area of La Cresta Road and Greenfield Drive, the California Highway Patrol.The motorist, who was pronounced dead at the scene, may have struck a pole at the location.  Jessica Ranck, July 23, 2017 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img

Sterling Transfer Site Goes To Winter Hours On Sunday

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The hours at the Sterling transfer site change to 10am to 6pm, starting on Sunday. Beginning October 1 the transfer site is closed on Sundays through the winter. Questions? Call the Kenai Peninsula Borough Solid Waste Department (907) 262-9667. From October to May each year the landfill will be open 10am to 6pm, Monday-Saturday. The Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly voted back in 2016 to close Borough dumps on Sunday from October to May. October 1 will kick off the seasonal landfill closure. The Central Peninsula Landfill and Kasilof, Kenai, Nikiski and Sterling Transfer Sites will be closed on Sundays for the winter beginning October 1 through April 28, 2019. Sundays will re-open for the summer season.last_img