Vermont gets an ‘A’ for financial security of families

first_imgIndividuals and families in Arizona, South Carolina and the Delta states of Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas lag behind the rest of the country in key aspects related to their financial stability, including measures of net worth, homeownership and housing affordability, business ownership, health insurance coverage and academic achievement. These states received an overall grade of “F” on the 2009-2010Assets & Opportunity Scorecard, which rates states not only on poverty and job figures, but also on a broad set of categories and measures related to sustained prosperity. The Scorecard was released today by the Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED), a national economic nonprofit.CFED’s Assets & Opportunity Scorecard — online at scorecard.cfed.org — measures the financial security of families in the United States by looking at the whole picture of asset ownership and protecting against financial setbacks. The Scorecard ranks the 50 states and the District of Columbia on 58 performance measures in the areas of Financial Assets & Income, Businesses & Jobs, Housing & Homeownership, Health Care and Education. In addition, the Scorecard also assesses states on the strength of its policies to help individuals and families build financial security.”As the country recovers from this recession and tries to build a more durable and robust economy, decision makers need to look at a broad picture of where Americans stand, and what policies are in place to address economic vulnerabilities. The Scorecard provides that perspective,” said CFED President Andrea Levere. Levere also pointed out that every state has weak areas, and that even the states that received “F” grades perform well in some categories.Nationally, the Scorecard notes that even before the current recession, economic vulnerability was increasing, especially among low- and middle-income families. Among the findings:While U.S. households overall registered a 27% increase in net worth between 2004 and 2006, median net worth fell during that period for the 40% of U.S. households earning less than $37,000 a year.The number of individuals with employer-provided health insurance fell sharply, to 60.9% from 63.2%, leaving more Americans vulnerable and financially unprepared for health emergencies.Between 2006 and 2008, median amount of revolving debt, including credit card debt, rose 64% from $1,805 to $2,960.While more than one in eight households live below the federal income poverty line, nearly double that amount (22.5%) are asset poor, meaning they have insufficient assets to stay out of poverty for three months in the event of job loss. More than 14% of American households live in extreme asset poverty, meaning they have zero or negative net worth.For every dollar in wealth held by white households, African-American households have 10 cents and Latino households have 15 cents.The national leaders on the 2009-2010 Scorecard — those states that earned an overall “A” in performance measures — were Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Vermont, Washington and Wyoming. Grades and detailed data for all states is available at scorecard.cfed.org.By comparing the states, the Scorecard not only highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each state, but it also exposes the wide differences between states on a number of items directly tied to financial prosperity. Some of the findings include:More than 22% of jobs in this country are in occupations that pay a median wage that is insufficient to raise the earner’s household above the poverty line. In West Virginia, 38.5% of jobs are low-wage. Washington, D.C. has the lowest percentage of low-wage jobs at 7.2%.The highest homeownership rate is in Minnesota (nearly 75%) while New York has the lowest homeownership rate at 53%.The average home in Kansas costs about twice the median income of a Kansan; in Massachusetts, the average home runs six times the state’s median income.89.6% of employers in Hawaii offer health care benefits to their employees compared with only 40.1% of those in Montana.More than 91% of the people in Massachusetts have health insurance while only 72.5% of Texans are insured.The Scorecard includes a detailed look of state-to-state information on 12 policy priorities that can help residents build and protect assets. Information on each of these policies — which range from first-time homebuyer assistance and payday lending protections to college savings incentives and access to health insurance — is available atscorecard.cfed.org. While every state has enacted at least a handful of these policies, the Scorecard’s assessment of these policies shows there is significant room for improvement.”These policy priorities are not radical ideas, but things that many states are trying right now,” Levere said. “But when we look at the funding, the scope of their efforts and the enforcement of regulations, we find that in most cases states haven’t been putting a very strong commitment into their efforts.”As part of its Scorecard work, CFED has formed partnerships with advocacy organizations in 25 states to utilize theScorecard to educate policy makers and the public on policies that can help Americans build and protect assets and financial security, and to improve policies at the state level.CFED expands economic opportunity by helping Americans and their children build assets, save for the future, start and grow businesses, pursue education and become homeowners. We identify, refine and help realize good ideas and develop partnerships to promote lasting change. We bring together community practice, public policy and private markets in new and effective ways to achieve greater economic impact. Established in 1979 as the Corporation for Enterprise Development, CFED works nationally and internationally through its offices in Washington, DC; Durham, North Carolina; and San Francisco, California.To stay up-to-date on the latest news from CFED, follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/CFEDNews(link is external).To view the Multimedia News Release, go to: http://www.prnewswire.com/mnr/cfed/39626/(link is external)(Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20090921/NY78564(link is external) )Source: CFED. WASHINGTON, Sept. 21, 2009 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

CWI continues to support the PCL

first_imgCRICKET West Indies (CWI) continues to streamline and improve the Professional Cricket League (PCL) in the region for the sake of development of the sport.The board’s initial arrangement was to fund the league for a couple years and then let the territories take over but according to CWI director and president of the T&T Cricket Board (TTCB), Azim Bassarath, “CWI has and will continue to take care of the PCL financially, in order to keep the players employed and to offer them the comfort of knowing that there is a salary there for them and they can concentrate on their cricket.“We have seen so much positives come out of this arrangement that it has been one of the better programmes put in place in West Indies cricket for a very long time now.The idea which was initially touted by the president of CWI, Dave Cameron, has really taken off and with stiff economic times being experienced all over the Caribbean, the territories found it difficult to find investors.“This by no means indicated that the PCL was not good. In fact, having discussions with investors in my capacity as president of the TTCB, many of them have indicated that the PCL is what would take West Indies cricket right back up the ladder.They have been warning though that we must continue to work the model all the time to make sure we have the right equation in place and we have been doing that at the CWI.”This year, the PCL will enter its fourth season, having bowled off in 2014. “We are looking towards another good season in the PCL and what is great to see is that the selectors are paying attention to the players who go out there week after week and represent their franchise.The path is clear for our players. All they need to do is put down the hard work, go out there and perform well and they will be playing for the West Indies.”The six franchises, hailing from each of the West Indies territories, compete in the Regional Four-Day Competition yearly.They are also automatically included in the Regional Super50 Competition, which takes place during the first quarter of each year.These competitions are to not only prepare the regional players, but also give the selectors an opportunity to efficiently select the Test and One-Day International squads respectively.The franchises are: Guyana Jaguars, Barbados Pride, Leeward Islands Hurricanes, T&T Red Force, Windward Islands Volcanoes, Jamaica Scorpions.last_img read more