Fighter jets over Nunavut

first_imgAPTN National NewsCanada’s fighter jets are once again roaring in the skies over Nunavut.It’s all part of Operation Nanook.The federal government is hoping that an increased military presence in the area will strengthen their sovereignty claims in the Arctic.APTN National News reporter Wayne Rivers met up with one young pilot and files this report.last_img

Shamattawa First Nation declares state of emergency after fire guts store band

first_img(The grocery store and band office in Shamattawa First Nation was gutted by fire Thursday. Photo courtesy Roy Miles)Dennis WardAPTN National NewsThe Chief of a northern Manitoba First Nation has declared a state of emergency after a fire destroyed the only grocery store, the band office, 911 call centre ‎and radio station.The fire has also resulted in the loss of Internet service in the remote northern community, something Chief Jeffrey Napaokesik says the community relies on heavily.Reports of the fire first came in Thursday afternoon when many in the community were attending a funeral.When reached by phone Thursday night, the chief said the fire continues to burn.He said the immediate concern is getting an emergency supply store set up as soon as possible on Friday.Photo Courtesy Roy Miles.Napaokesik said most members of the community are on social assistance and live day to day. There will be an immediate need for things like water and baby formula.There will be an immediate need for things like water and baby formula.Shamattawa First Nation is a fly-in community with about 1,000 members 750 kilometres northeast of Winnipeg.Officials from the Northwest Company are due in Shamattawa in the morning with supplies for an emergency store that will be established.The chief said things are calm right now but expects people to wake up in a panic in the morning.Officials will be going door to door in the morning to explain how things will be handled.The chief said at the moment nobody appears to be missing or have been caught in the fire.He says it’s too early to know how the fire started.dward@aptn.calast_img read more

Manitoba families call for National Inquiry reset that includes the resignation of

first_imgAPTN National NewsA coalition of families and survivors of missing and murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in Manitoba is calling on the remaining commissioners at the national inquiry to “be brave” and resign.“We the families of MMIWG and survivors in Manitoba have lost confidence in the national inquiry,” said Hilda Anderson Pyrz, co-chair of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Coalition of Manitoba. “The families and survivors agree that a hard reset required. This hard reset requires the resignation of the lead commissioner and of the remaining three commissioners and the explicit inclusion of policing in the terms of reference.”Family members and advocates gathered on Wednesday on the heels of the latest resignation from the embattled National Inquiry, this time from Commissioner Marilyn Poitras.The Manitoba coalition says they’ve “lost confidence” in what they call a “flawed process.” They cite a lack of communication, consultation and transparency. They’re also calling on the government to include policing in the terms of reference which has been a point of contention for many advocates and family members.The coalition will be writing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to let him know how they’d like to see the process move forward in Manitoba.That would include a regional, Indigenous process building on the “Families First” approach already being utilized. The Coalition would like to see a Commissioner for Manitoba that would work regionally and work parallel with the National Inquiry.“We are also calling for the implementation of an Indigenous design and Indigenous-led process for Manitoba that can contribute to a renewed national inquiry process,” said Pyrz.No names were put forward but some in the coalition believe a family member who is dealing with the pain and grief of losing a loved one should be named as a commissioner.On Monday, Marilyn Poitras sent a letter of resignation to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau stating that she couldn’t fulfill her role as commissioner under the current structure of the inquiry. She sent a more detailed letter out Tuesday saying that few at the inquiry shared her vision of how the process should work.Poirtras’ resignation is the fifth resignation in the past couple of months. In June, the commission lost senior communications officer Sue Montgomery, Tanya Kappo, manager of communications, Chantale Courcy, director of operations and Michèle Moreau, the inquiry’s executive director.According to head Commissioner Marion Buller, people left for personal reasons – and “better opportunities.”Poitras’ resignation forced Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett to call a meeting with the commissioners to find out where the inquiry is at in terms of fulfilling its mandate.Indigenous Affairs Minister meeting with reporters Tuesday on Parliament Hill. Bennett called a news conference on Parliament Hill Tuesday to tell media that she was surprised with how much work the inquiry had done and was impressed with the work plan in place.“There is no question, that we all agree, communication has been an issue. And that they have got to do a better job at communicating their vision, their plan, values and the way that they’re going to get this work done,” said Bennett.The Manitoba families said they are not calling for the national inquiry to be scrapped – but restructured, including the need for regional representation.“Manitoba would name its own Indigenous commissioner,” said Sandra Delaronde – Co chair MMIWG Family and survivors coalition. “That would do the work regionally and then that work would feed into the national inquiry. The people in Manitoba, the coalition, in concert with the families, feel it’s important to be in control of the inquiry. We waited 20 years for the inquiry to come into play and the inquiry in its current form is not hearing the voices, is not inviting the consultation of the people in the region, or if it invites it, it’s not listening.”Betty Rourke, whose daughter was murdered in 2013, and a sister murdered in 1980, said it was hard to watch the National Inquiry livestream from Whitehorse at the end of May.She said she refuses to be “on trial” and said her family is hurting and feels nothing will come from the Inquiry in its current form.“It’s just a big farce. It’s all about money. All those commissioners are getting paid big bucks because of me hurting and all of my missing and murdered Family. We’re all hurting but we get nothing. No Answers, no phone calls, nothing,” said Rourke.The coalition said the process to choose a Manitoba commissioner would follow the same path as for the inquiry – the main quality being a person who can work with the families.“The families don’t feel heard. They aren’t engaging in this process. They don’t feel like they are able to engage in this process,” said Angie Hutchinson, a member of the coalition. “And they don’t feel like their loved ones are being valued in this process and we want to look at changing that.”Lead Commissioner Marion Buller. On Tuesday, Ontario Native Women’s Association sent a letter to Commissioner Marion Buller rescinding the association’s support of the inquiry.“This Inquiry needs to honour Missing, Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls,” said Executive Director, Cora McGuire-Cyrette in a statement posted Tuesday. “We cannot continue to harm the most vulnerable population in our communities. When do Indigenous Women get to matter? We want the Inquiry to assist families in their healing and to help Canada, Indigenous nations and communities to provide the guideposts to the changes we need so that we do not lose any more Indigenous women and girls to violence. We do not believe that the Inquiry in its current configuration can achieve these outcomes.”A spokesperson for Carolyn Bennett said the Indigenous Affairs Minister stands by the statements she made Tuesday. dward@aptn.calast_img read more

Quebec inquiry hears many Inuit get paid less benefits for same work

first_imgTom Fennario APTN NewsAs the director of health and social services in Nunavik, Minnie Grey says the health care system in northern Quebec has created class divisions.One where non-Inuit can make $40,000 in non-salary benefits, while local Inuit receive only a quarter of that.“Can we just do away with what was given in the ’60s so we can all just be even?” Grey testified at the Quebec inquiry that has been examining discrimination experienced by Indigenous Quebecers.The reason for the difference, according to union rules for health service providers, is that workers working more than 50 kilometres from home are entitled to greater benefits.Those include vehicle expenses, flights back home and, perhaps most offensive to Grey, free housing where overcrowding is rampant.“The inequality comes in the fact that we’re not offering these incentives to local people, so we’re not attracting them to be working in our services,” she said.Because many jobs in Nunavik require knowledge of Inuit culture and language, so local workers are highly sought after. Many leave their communities to make what non-Inuit make, which in turn makes things more expensive.There is also the issue of a lack of qualified Inuit.Jean-Francois Arteau, a lawyer for Nunavik Health Services, testified Quebec is not meeting its education and training obligations under the James Bay Agreement.“It’s been 40 years since the agreement has been signed, we’re not in the first few years of operation, we’re 40 years later and it’s still complicated for Inuit to access jobs that were targeted for them,” said Arteau.Grey said her team has proposed a solution – create positions just for Inuit workers and pay them their fair share.“The fact that we’re still trying to convince the ministry that giving equality to local workers can save a lot of money because we have a very high turnover of non-locals,” she said.It’s not something the province has jumped at, she said, but Grey is happy to share her knowledge with the inquiry.“I’m very pleased that I was able to be here with my colleagues and to have a voice and someone is listening,” she said.tfennario@aptn.calast_img read more

Firing of Indigenous Waves producer at CIUT sends shivers through volunteers

first_imgBeverly AndrewsAPTN NewsCommunity radio is often a beacon for community members, and underrepresented groups to have a voice on the airwaves.But sometimes those voices are censored – and ultimately silenced.In February, the producer for a program called Indigenous Waves on CIUT was suspended for comments she made on-air about two high profile murder trials and about CIUT and its board or directors.Now other volunteers are wondering what they can, and cannot say on the community airwaves.bandrews@aptn.ca@aptnbeverlylast_img

Canadian industries concerned about knockon effects of Bombardier tariffs

first_imgCALGARY – The U.S. Department of Commerce’s decision this week to slap major tariffs on Bombardier has raised concerns about ripple effects across Canada’s trade exposed industries.Jean Simard, president of the Aluminium Association of Canada, said the decision to impose duties of 220 per cent on Bombardier’s CSeries jets creates uncertainty across the manufacturing sector, including those supplying raw materials.“This very strong signal of enforcement by the U.S. administration adds up to a very volatile business environment, which nobody likes.”He said the aggressive move threatens to disrupt the well-integrated manufacturing processes, with industries like aluminum smelting possibly hit by collateral damage from the trade talks.“When you start tweaking the rules, the complexity of the consequences can be phenomenal,” said Simard.“Any decision of this kind certainly sends a tremor through the supply chain throughout North America.”Unifor president Jerry Dias said the Bombardier tariff is the latest U.S. move against many of Canada’s key industries.“They’re going after Bombardier, they’re talking about steel, aluminum, so there’s a whole bunch of balls in the air right now.”“They are going after the heart of so many of our industries, so ultimately we need to find a remedy, and I would suggest that has to be fairly quickly before this thing continues to digress,” said Dias.The concerns for business come as the third round of North American free trade talks wrapped up in Ottawa Wednesday, with little progress on key issues like domestic content requirements in manufacturing.Canadian softwood-lumber producers have already felt the impact of the tactics with the U.S. imposing tariffs on imports earlier this year.A spokesman for the Forest Products Association of Canada said the group had no comment on what the Bombardier tariffs might mean for their efforts to resolve their impasse with the U.S.Bernard Wolf, an economics professor at York University’s Schulich School of Business, said the U.S. tactics are misguided as they can do real damage to a system that’s benefited everyone.“There are supply chains that have been established, particularly in the automotive industry, that you can really mess up.”Wolf said the latest tariffs show the U.S. is looking to take advantage of any perceived subsidies or unfairness in the system.“This certainly is a red flag in terms of the Americans looking for other areas where there are subsidies,” he said.“The whole administration is trying to be more aggressive wherever it can. It’s very much America first.”Ian Lee, an associate professor at Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business, said the moves against open trade go much deeper than U.S. President Donald Trump, and that he’s tapping into greater frustration about perceived negative effects of trade deals.“He’s decided he’s going to go after those parts of the NAFTA agreement that have disadvantaged the United States.”Lee said Canada has long protected airlines, banking, telecoms and especially dairy through supply management while pushing for open access to the U.S. markets, and the U.S. is now pushing back.“We’re approaching a Rubicon, where the Americans are saying here’s our line in the sand, here’s the things we want. And they are going to get it or walk away.”Graham Lloyd, CEO of the Dairy Farmers of Ontario, said, however, that he has faith the federal government will continue to stand up for the dairy industry, despite U.S. dairy farmers being desperate to access the Canadian market.“We don’t have any reason to have doubt the government wants to and will continue to protect us.”While it’s not clear what concessions or policy changes might result from the trade disputes, Simard at the aluminium association says the disputes themselves are making it very difficult for industries to make any sort of long-term plans and investments.“We’re just having layers of uncertainty upon layers of uncertainty,” he said. “You have to be able to see down the road. Right now we don’t see the road.”last_img read more

Census Home ownership rates take historic dip as more Canadians opt to

first_imgOTTAWA – Not everyone wants to own a home these days, Evan Siddall concedes — not even his own millennial-age son. For the head of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., that’s really saying something.But Siddall’s experience is far from uncommon, the latest census figures show: 30-year-old Canadians are less likely to own a home today than their baby boomer parents did at the same age, mirroring a modest but unmistakable decline in the national home ownership rate.At age 30, 50.2 per cent of millennials owned their homes, compared to 55 per cent of baby boomers at the same age. Young adults today are more likely to live in apartments than their 1981 counterparts, are less likely to live in single-detached homes, and — as Statistics Canada revealed over the summer — more likely than ever before to still be living at home.The figures should change the way Canada thinks about its real estate sector, said Graham Haines, research and policy manager at the Ryerson City Building Institute in Toronto. Policy-makers have focused almost exclusively on policies to promote home ownership over the last 20-plus years, he said, pointing to tax policy and incentives.“We have to start thinking about — if rent is going to start becoming a more important part of our real estate sector once again — how we make sure we’re building the right type of rental, rental where we need it and rental that’s affordable for the people who are going to be using it,” Haines said.In 2016, more than 9.5 million of the 14.1 million households captured in the census owned their homes, an ownership rate of 67.8 per cent — down from 69 per cent in 2011 after 20 steady years of baby boomers flooding the real estate market.Since 2011, the census shows, the value of homes has steadily increased to a national average of $443,058, up from $345,182 in 2016 dollars. Vancouver had the highest prices in the country with the average home valued at over $1 million; Toronto was at $734,924 and Calgary at $527,216. Montreal came in at $366,974.As values have climbed in cities like Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton and Ottawa, so too have the percentage of renters, even though the supply of purpose-built rental units nationally has been on a decades-long decline as developers build more condominiums than apartments.Census data showed renters are more likely to be over-stretched financially to keep a roof over their heads.Almost 40 per cent of renters captured in the census spent more than 30 per cent of their average monthly income on housing — a figure largely unchanged from 2011 and more than double the approximately 17 per cent recorded for homeowners.Overall, affordability remains an issue for almost a quarter of Canadian households, a figure that hasn’t changed much in a decade, with the pressure most acute in the hot housing markets of Toronto and Vancouver.The federal Liberal government has promised to address affordability issues as part of an $11.2 billion, 11-year housing plan to be released in the coming weeks. It’s expected to have a heavy focus on building affordable units, with a new portable housing benefit that would be tied to individuals, rather than properties.Speaking earlier this fall about work on the strategy, Siddall said that the focus wasn’t solely on helping the ranks of homeowners.“Rent or own, a home is a home,” Siddall said in an interview.“When we think about housing we have got to think about renters who need support to rent, renters who rent on a market basis, and make sure people can migrate and own homes who should own homes.”The migration to home ownership is likely to pick up for millennials in the coming years as they start families and look for homes or condominiums — a class of home that saw a 1.2 per cent increase in households from 2011 — to fit their growing brood. At the same time, seniors will be looking to downsize.That means the baby boomers will continue to fuel changes in the housing market by how long they remain homeowners and whether their children and grandchildren decide to rent or buy.Haines said the two age groups, even though they are at different points in their lives, are likely to compete for the same kind of two-bedroom units that are a rarity in the market, potentially driving up costs. That may require policy-makers to get more involved in the market to make more family-friendly housing gets built instead of a heavy focus on studios and one-bedroom units, Haines said.“We’ve fallen into this trap of building (condo) units for investors rather than end users,” Haines said.“There are positive signs that we’re starting to recognize that over the last 20 years, we’ve sort of let the market do what the market wants and maybe we need a little more attention (to make sure) that we’re actually getting what we need for our population.”— Follow @jpress on Twitterlast_img read more

Key budgetary goal to help women enter workforce would lift economy analysis

first_imgOTTAWA – One of the predominant themes of next week’s federal budget will be increasing the workforce participation of women — and recently released internal documents point to big economic benefits for Canada if it can help more women enter the job market.The Liberal government has said improving the economic success of women and promoting gender equality will be among the primary objectives of next Tuesday’s budget.Options on the budgetary table include narrowing the pay equity gap, ensuring more gender equality in boardrooms, easing access to capital for female entrepreneurs and opening up more funding opportunities for female scientific researchers.These types of commitments could feed into Ottawa’s efforts to hit another overarching target for this government: raising the needle on long-term growth.A briefing note prepared for Finance Minister Bill Morneau estimates that closing the labour-market participation gap between women and men by half over 15 years would raise the country’s potential long-term economic growth by an average of 0.25 percentage points per year over that period.If nothing changes, the memo to Morneau estimates potential growth will “remain low” over the next 15 years at 1.7 per cent.But the analysis says raising the workforce participation rate of women by 4.5 percentage points by 2032 would lift Canada’s potential growth to about 1.9 per cent.With the intensifying negatives from Canada’s aging workforce, growth isn’t expected to pick up its pace without help. The briefing note, obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act, said the rapid pace of growth in 2017 is “not sustainable,” particularly as temporary economic factors fade and interest rates continue to rise.The document lists higher female labour-market participation among four broad policy goals that will boost potential economic growth.One of the others calls for raising immigration levels of skilled workers by 15,000 each year as a way to increase annual growth by 0.1 percentage points. Another is upping the participation rate of workers aged 55 to 64 years old — in line with those in top-performing countries — for an annual growth injection of 0.2 percentage points.The fourth policy option in the document is redacted.Next week, the Liberal government will table the first federal budget to scrutinize all its commitments through a gender-equality microscope.The Canadian Press obtained another briefing note that revealed the “proposed gender-equality framework” presented to Morneau last August.A senior government official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the budget details have yet to be made public, said the memo was an early version of the pillars examined for the budget. They noted, however, the gender-budgeting road map has evolved since that time, following consultations with experts.The document contained a detailed exploration of the gender gap in labour-force participation and underlined the importance of creating conditions to help more women enter the job market.It said the gender workforce divide narrowed considerably over the last few decades — from nearly 39 percentage points in the late 1970s to nine in recent years.However, the memo said the improvements have plateaued and are largely unchanged since the early 2000s, despite rising educational levels among women.“Higher representation of women in the labour force has led to higher incomes for Canadian families and, in turn, real economic gains,” said the note, also obtained under the Access to Information Act.The document noted that Canadian women with children are less involved in the labour market than those in many industrialized countries and identified them as a group with potential to further raise their work-force participation.Several stakeholders who participated in the government’s gender-related consultations last year are hoping the budget will contain measures such as dedicated leave for new fathers or non-birthing parents, cash for the Liberals’ promised pay-equity legislation and, possibly, something more on child care.There are expectations the budget could contain many commitments aimed at helping women — from trade missions designed for female entrepreneurs, to mentorships aimed at women, to setting aside a significant share of public contracts for women-led businesses.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau used his keynote speech at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland last month to say Ottawa will proceed this year with legislation to ensure equal pay for work of equal value in federal jobs as a “first step” towards getting more women into the workforce. He also said it’s time for serious looks at parental leave and child-care policies.Trudeau cited estimates by global consulting firm McKinsey and Company that narrowing the gender gap in Canada could add $150 billion to its economy by 2026.Last month, Ottawa also announced the winners of a $50-million program designed to teach digital and coding skills to more than one million kids — with a special emphasis on encouraging underrepresented groups like girls to get involved.The president and CEO of Actua, an organization that received $10 million of that amount, said creating more opportunities for women to join the workforce, particularly in rapidly expanding innovative industries, makes “huge economic sense.”“We’ll be facing even more workforce shortages in the future in these fields,” said Jennifer Flanagan. “We can’t afford to leave out half our population from the opportunity to fill in those workforce gaps.”Follow @AndyBlatchford on Twitterlast_img read more

Chinas economic growth cools amid trade tensions

first_imgBEIJING, China – China’s economic growth slowed in the quarter ending in June, adding to challenges for Beijing as its tariff battle with Washington escalates.The world’s second-largest economy expanded by 6.7 per cent over a year earlier, down from the previous quarter’s 6.8 per cent, the government reported Monday.Key drivers of growth including spending on construction and other investments were weakening even before the dispute with Washington erupted. Forecasters have expected a slowdown since Beijing tightened lending controls last year to rein in surging debt.Growth was “generally stable” but “the uncertainties of the external environment are mounting,” said Mao Shengyong, a spokesman for the National Bureau of Statistics.Chinese leaders have expressed confidence their $12 trillion-a-year economy can survive the tariff war with U.S. President Donald Trump. Beijing is resisting American pressure to change industrial policies Washington says are based on stealing or pressuring foreign companies to hand over technology and might threaten U.S. industrial leadership.But forecasters said the downturn is likely to deepen as Beijing tightens financial controls and trade tensions worsen.“There are risks that Chinese growth will slow more abruptly,” Citigroup economists said in a report.Washington imposed an additional 25 per cent tariff on $34 billion of Chinese goods on July 6. Beijing retaliated with similar penalties on the same amount of U.S. imports. Washington fired back last week with a threat of 10 per cent tariffs on an additional $200 billion list of goods.Trade contributes less to China’s economic growth than it did a decade ago but still supports millions of jobs. Even though Trump’s first tariff hike didn’t take effect the current quarter, exporters say American orders started to fall off as early as April.More broadly, anxiety about tariffs “is already dampening business confidence and delaying investment,” said Louis Kuijs of Oxford Economics in a report.Unless the two sides restart negotiations, “the conflict will escalate further, with major economic implications for themselves and the global economy,” said Kuijs.Of greater concern than trade is “slowing domestic demand within China’s economy,” said Tom Rafferty of the Economist Intelligence Unit in a report.China is the No. 1 trading partner for its Asian neighbours and buys oil, iron ore and other raw materials from Australia, Brazil and elsewhere. Chinese consumers are an increasingly important market for food, clothes, electronics and other goods.Investment in factories, housing and other fixed assets decelerated in the latest quarter. It rose by 6 per cent in the first half, down 1.5 percentage points from the first quarter.Chinese leaders are in the midst of a marathon effort to encourage self-sustaining growth driven by domestic consumption and reduce reliance on exports and investment.Beijing has responded to previous downturns by flooding the state-dominated economy with credit. But that has swelled debt, prompting concerns about risks to the banking system. The ruling Communist Party has made controlling financial risks a priority this year, suggesting it will resist easing lending controls.Consumer spending has risen more slowly than planned, leaving economic growth dependent on debt-supported investment.Retail spending in June rose by 9 per cent over a year earlier, a half-percentage point higher than in May. The increase was driven by rapid growth in the sales of higher-end consumer goods such as cosmetics and audio-video equipment.Forecasters say if threatened tariff hikes by both sides are fully carried out, that could cut China’s 2019 growth by up to 0.3 percentage points.Mao, the statistics bureau spokesman, declined to say how much the dispute might hurt Chinese economic growth.“But generally speaking, trade frictions unilaterally started by U.S. will have an impact on the economy of both countries,” Mao said.last_img read more

Fort St John man busted at wheel of bait car in Kelowna

first_imgKELOWNA, B.C. — A man originally from Fort St. John was arrested in Kelowna on Sunday evening after he allegedly stole a Bait Car. At around 9:50 p.m. last Sunday,  members of the Kelowna RCMP members were advised by dispatcher that one of the city’s Bait Cars had been activated. Dispatch was able to provide live video feed updates to pursuing officers as the male suspect drove northbound towards Lake Country.Members from the Lake Country Detachment were advised of the vehicle’s location, and once police were in position the vehicle’s engine was disabled. The driver was taken into police custody without incident. 37-year-old Kenneth William Fawcett of Fort St. John has been charged with theft of a motor vehicle and driving while prohibited.  Kelowna RCMP Cst. Lesley Smith said in a release that Fawcett is “a well known Prolific Offender and has a lengthy criminal record for vehicle thefts and other property related offences. In any given community prolific offenders account for 80 percent of all crime committed. Be rest assured our members will continue to identify, locate and arrest these individuals and hold them accountable for the crimes they have committed.”It’s not know whether Fawcett has been released from custody, or when he is due to make his next court appearance.last_img read more

Fort St John Chapter of the ALS Society holds Walk to End

first_img“It went really well, actually. We ended up raising, I think there’s still money coming in, but we ended up raising $43,963.”Out of that amount, Charlie Lake Elementary School managed to raise $12,000 in funds.The event featured food, music, games, raffles, and activities for the entire family.All money raised from the Walk goes towards helping support patients, families and caregivers that are fighting ALS. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John Chapter of the ALS Society held their second annual ‘Walk to End ALS’ on Sunday, June 2.Over 200 walkers met at the corner of 100 street and 100 Avenue to take part in the Walk.Walk Coordinator, Audrey Jones, says the walk went really well, managing to raise close to $44,000 from this year’s walk.last_img

Man clobbered to death with stone

first_imgNew Delhi: A man was beaten to death with stone in Sangam Vihar area in South Delhi. Police claimed that the accused then chopped his body and dumped it in the forest areas.Police identified the accused as Akash, a resident of Sangam Vihar area. “On 7 March around 2 am they received credible information about the murder case in the forested areas of street number 12 in Shooting Range road,” said police sources. They further added that the team nabbed the accused from Sangam Vihar and during questioning he claimed that he had killed one Saroj who lives in F2 block (Sangam Vihar) by beating him with stone. Also Read – Bangla Sahib Gurudwara bans use of all types of plastic itemsPolice further stated that after killing he disposed of the body into pieces and hide it inside the pit in the forested areas. The staff took the accused to forest and started searching. “There were marks of dragging and the blood stain on the ground. Later the accused pointed through the weapon of offence “stone”, said police sources adding that the accused told them that after killing he dragged the body of the Saroj. Moving further police team found that there were fresh mud and stone inside the pit. “After removing mud and stone a sack was found containing the body pieces including the head, legs,” police said. Police further claimed that the accused had some personal enmity with the deceased. “Three years ago he was beaten up by the deceased and to take revenge of that incident he hatched the murder plan,” police said. A case under sections 302 and 201 of IPC registered.last_img read more

CILANTRO RUBBED ROAST CHICKEN

first_imgIngredients Chicken Breast 250 g Vegetables 80 g Lyonnaise Potato 80 g Strawberry & Grapes Emulsion 30 ml Fresh Coriander 20 g Chopped Parsley 5 g Olive Oil 10 ml Chopped Garlic 10 g Salt to taste Crushed Black Pepper 2 g Also Read – PUMPKIN MASH, TAMATAR RASSAPreparation Marinate the chicken breast with fresh coriander and garlic paste; add seasoning, keep aside for 30 minutes. Grill the chicken breast, vegetables and lyonnaise potato. Now, arrange the grilled chicken breast on a plate with grilled vegeables and lyonnaise potatoes. Pour strawberry and grapes emulsion, garnish with sprig of parsley or herb. (Courtesy: Chef Aashish Joshi, Jaypee Siddharth, New Delhi)last_img

Congress to come up with Delhi specificmanifesto

first_imgNEW DELHI: The Congress’s Delhi unit will come out with a separate election manifesto for the national capital focusing on issues faced by unauthorised colony residents, the issue of sealing and pollution, a party spokesperson said on Tuesday. The manifesto will be released soon after the announcement of party candidates, said Delhi Congress spokesperson Jitender Kochar . “The manifesto will focus on areas like unauthorised colonies, pollution, sealing, among others, that have been crucial for Delhi,” he told reporters. The Congress last week released its Lok Sabha election manifesto “Ham Nibhayenge” (we will deliver), covering all sections of the society and promising Rs 72,000 per annum to the poorest 20 per cent of the country. Delhi Congress President Sheila Dikshit met party councilors of the three municipal corporations in the city and called upon them to take the manifesto to people in door to door campaign.last_img read more

We need to catch momentum now Ashwin

first_imgNew Delhi: After succumbing to a five-wicket loss to Delhi Capitals on Saturday, Kings XI Punjab captain R. Ashwin said his team needs to catch momentum and come back on the winning track in the remaining games of the ongoing Indian Premier League (IPL) season. “This tournament is all about stringing wins together and we need to catch the momentum now,” Ashwin said after Punjab succumbed to their third loss in the last four games. Put in to bat first on a slow Feroz Shah Kotla pitch, swashbuckling West Indies opener Chris Gayle smacked 37-ball 69 as the Punjab-based franchise posted 163/7 in their stipulated quota of 20 overs. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over Chandigarh However, Delhi, who have had a poor record at the home ground in the ongoing IPL, chased down the target riding on the half-centuries from Shikhar Dhawan (56) and Shreyas Iyer (58*), with two balls to spare. Ashwin said the total put up by his team was “just below par” because of the dew. “It was quite hard to grip the ball for the spinners. We lost too many wickets in the middle despite Gayle playing a brilliant knock,” he said. He also rued the fact that spinner Mujeeb ur Rehman had to sit out because of an injury. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later “Someone like Mujeeb is a very important player for us. It happened last year as well, he got a soft tissue injury. It was quite disappointing from that angle,” the off-spinner said. “But having said we have enough talent to back him up but unfortunately we didn’t have enough runs on the board today. We were giving away one or two soft boundaries and we need to be tight there. If we had 12-13 in the last over, we would have fancied ourselves,” he added. With five wins from 10 games, Kings XI are currently placed at the fourth spot in the points table. They will next face bottom-placed Royal Challengers Bangalore (RCB) on Wednesday.last_img read more

Fears linger at Algeria gas plant year after bloody siege

first_imgALGIERS- Algeria has ramped up security along the borders and at energy facilities countrywide, but concerns linger over safety at the In Amenas gas plant one year after dozens died in a bloody hostage attack.Heavily armed Islamists stormed the isolated Tiguentourine complex, which lies deep in the Sahara desert, on January 16, 2013, with 38 hostages killed in a four-day siege and army rescue operation that followed.All but one of those who died were foreigners. The North African country is heavily dependent on its energy sector, with hydrocarbons accounting for more than 97 percent of export earnings.But despite the security reinforcements, Al-Qaeda-linked militants remain a serious threat throughout the Sahara region, adding to the concerns of foreign firms which Algeria relies on to maintain production at its ageing oil and gas fields.A top US general warned last week that Mokhtar Belmokhtar, the veteran jihadist who masterminded the hostage raid, had the capability to stage “another attack like In Amenas”.Belmokhtar’s breakaway Al-Qaeda group “Signatories in Blood” claimed the attack, saying it was in retaliation for France’s military intervention against Islamist militants in Mali.Norwegian firm Statoil, which jointly operates the plant along with Britain’s BP and Algeria’s Sonatrach, has returned to the country but not the site, where one of three production trains damaged in the attack is still out of action.Statoil lost five employees, and only one of the 12 survivors is prepared to go back to In Amenas.“It’s a shame because I would have preferred it if there were others. But that’s how it is. It’s important that the families of my colleagues have their say,” Kolbjoern Kirkeboe, 52, told AFP.BP and Japanese engineering firm JGC, which alone lost 10 employees, are still waiting to return to In Amenas, where an inspection is planned in the coming days to assess the site’s security, and the possible go-ahead.To better protect expatriates working at the complex, which lies 1,300 kilometres (800 miles) southeast of Algiers, a landing strip is being built to provide a safer passage to and from the site.Statoil has barred its employee from spending the night there until the new security measures are in place.  Kirkeboe was in the bus ferrying workers from the site that came under attack at the start of the raid.Algeria refuses to allow foreign companies to organise their own security arrangements at the sites where they operate.That task is entrusted to the Algerian military, which was criticised at the time for its handling of what was one of the worst hostage bloodbaths in years.Sonatrach’s chairman Abdelhamid Zerguine said in October that the security of all its production sites, including those operated with foreign partners, was “guaranteed by the country’s security authorities”.Statoil experts had concluded in a report published the previous month that security at In Amenas had relied too heavily on the Algerian army.“Neither Statoil nor the joint venture could have prevented the attack, but there is reason to question the extent of their reliance on Algerian military protection,” the report said.The energy-rich North African country has dramatically increased security at its oil and gas installations since the attack, and along the vast porous borders its shares with Libya and Mali.Military sources, cited by independent Algerian daily El-Watan, indicated recently that 20,000 troops had been deployed along the country’s eastern and southern frontiers, with another 1,500 combing the region day and night,assisted by continuous air cover.“Military command has sent the majority of its aircraft to Ouargla and Tamanrasset (in southern Algeria) as the main bases for intervention,” said one of the sources.Helicopters and Seeker II drones equipped with hi-tech reconnaissance equipment are able to carry out surveillance missions and precision air strikes.There are indications that Algeria’s heightened security arrangements are paying off, with several Islamist convoys having been destroyed between Tamanrasset in the far south and Illizi in the southeast, according to the military source.In October, the army announced that it had seized a large weapons cache near the Libyan border, 200 kilometres (125 miles) from In Amenas.last_img read more

Libya wins the African Cup of Nations for local players

first_imgRabat- The Libyan national team on Saturday won the third edition of the African Cup of Nations for local players (CHAN) 2014, which was held in South Africa. The Libyan team won the tile with a 4-3 penalty shoot-out win over Ghana in Cape Town.This is the first time that Libya wins the African Cup of Nations in its history and is the second time that a Maghreb team wins the continental tournament, after Tunisia, which won the first edition of the tournament in 2011.last_img

Italy Moroccan Team Victim of Racism

first_imgTaroudnat, Morocco- A team of Moroccan immigrants playing in a minor league in Italy is considering to quite the league after its players were the target of racists attacks after rival fans told them to “go back home.”According to ANSA.it, earlier this week, a Moroccan team called “Casablanca” had decided to quit the Usip league in the eastern city of Forli after two episodes of racism. The first one was during a match against Club Juventinità di Forlimpopoli, which the Moroccans won 3-0 and the second one was when a rival team shouted at them saying “go back home Moroccans.”According to the same source, the Moroccan team has reconsidered quitting the league. “We will not withdraw. We remain in the field because otherwise, it would mean a defeat by racism,” Youssef Laazizi, a defender with Casablanca team was quoted by the same source as saying.What seemingly upset the Moroccan team is that the referee did not take any measure after the players complained to him.Following the incident, the Casablanca team has decided to send a petition to the league. “We can’t stand it any longer,” Rachid Hansal, the captain of the team was quoted by Italian media as saying.© Morocco World News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, rewritten or redistributedlast_img read more

Morocco Violent Fights in Meknes Ahead of Sunset Prayer

By Amin  MechaalMeknes – Two men were taken to a local hospital following violent fights a few moments before Al-maghrib prayer call, in the Sidi Baba and Sidi Bouzekri neighborhoods in the city of Meknés. The first fight erupted in the Sidi Bouzekri neighborhood, during which a person was seriously injured in the chest after his opponent stabbed him with a sword, before he was taken to the Mohammed V Hospital in Meknes. In the Sidi Baba neighborhood, which frequently witnesses deadly fights, a man was seriously wounded in the hand after he tried to avoid a blow from a sword.According to Meknés press, the injured, who is also receiving a medical treatment at Mohammed V hospital, may lose his hand as a result of this wound if he is not transferred to the university hospital of Fez.These two neighborhoods are hot spots of criminality and drug cartels in Meknes. Fights take place more or less on a daily basis.The fight reminds us of hundreds of other fights around the kingdom, particularly during Ramadan, which leads to the death of dozens of people every year.Edited by Timothy Filla read more

USA Welcomes Lebanons Formation of New Government

Washington DC – The United States welcomed, on Monday, Lebanon’s announcement of the formation of a new government and congratulated Prime Minister Saad Hariri, the U.S. department of state said.“The United States encourages the Lebanese government to seize this opportunity to respond to the needs of the Lebanese people and to address the pressing security, economic, and humanitarian challenges facing the country,” said John Kirby, Assistant Secretary and Department Spokesperson in a statement.“The United States reaffirms its strong support for Lebanon’s security, stability, and sovereignty and looks forward to working with the new Lebanese government,” the same source added. “We will continue to stand with its (Lebanon) state institutions and the Lebanese people as they build a stable and prosperous future,” it concluded. read more