Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo EV confirmed for late 2020 launch

first_img Electric Cars Sports Cars Future Cars Porsche Mission E Cross Turismo in the real world Porsche Review • 2019 Porsche Cayenne review: The enthusiast’s SUV More about 2019 Porsche Cayenne 2018 Porsche Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid Sport Turismo: A mighty, frugal wagon 2019 Porsche Cayenne S review: The sporting life Tags Post a comment 2019 Porsche Cayenne Turbo review: The performance SUV par excellence More From Roadshow Share your voice Porsche’s annual press conference in Stuttgart was, in part, a celebration of the past year’s developments. But it also confirmed yet another piece in Porsche’s puzzle of future products, too.Porsche confirmed on Friday, as part of its annual press conference, that the Taycan Cross Turismo has been cleared for production at the end of 2020, which would put its debut about a year after the standard Taycan’s debut this coming September. Porsche first confirmed Cross Turismo production last October, but it hadn’t clarified a date at that point.In all likelihood, the Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo will share the Taycan’s powertrain, with its electric motors putting out approximately 600 horsepower. It should reach 62 miles per hour in about 3.5 seconds, although the taller, bulkier body of the Cross Turismo may tack an extra tenth or two onto that figure. As for range, it’s estimated to be around the 300-mile mark, but that will likely change once the EPA tests it, as its estimates are usually slightly lower than its European counterpart.Enlarge ImageWhile the Cross Turismo is a little SUV-ish, it shouldn’t get in the way of Porsche’s future electric SUVs. There’s a place for everything in its next-gen lineup. Porsche Along with the Taycan that precedes it, the Taycan Cross Turismo is part of Porsche’s plan to electrify its lineup in the coming years. At Porsche’s press conference, chairman Oliver Blume said that, by 2025, more than half of all Porsche vehicles will be available with an electric motor. In addition to both Taycan variants, Porsche has also confirmed that the next-generation Macan will go electric, as well.Given that the Taycan Cross Turismo could be seen as a quasi-SUV of sorts, Porsche doesn’t feel there will be any overlap between it and the upcoming electric Macan. “The Cross Turismo concept is basically a more lifestyle-ish interpretation of the Taycan,” said Detlev von Platen, Porsche’s board member in charge of sales and marketing, in an interview with Roadshow on the sidelines of the conference. “It’s not directly targeting the SUV market.”Despite nobody seeing its production form yet, Porsche is already facing some serious demand for its first purely battery-electric vehicle. Earlier in March, Porsche announced that it identified more than 20,000 people with serious interest in the car, enough to force the company to double its first-year production from 20,000 vehicles to 40,000. It will be built in Zuffenhausen, where Porsche manufactures its 911 and 718 lineups, with its own dedicated assembly and paint facilities. Preview • 2019 Porsche Cayenne: A stronger foundation 53 Photos 0 Porschelast_img read more

Indian Shares Open Flat Insurance Stocks Surge on Hopes of Hike in

first_imgIndian shares opened flat on Thursday, due to weak Asian rivals. Investors are also looking forward to some security before the new government presents its budget early or mid July. The BSE sensex took off at 24,794.61 points at 9.00 am and recorded a peak of 24,862.78 points.The market opened at 9.15 am for trading day at 24,788.33 points and recorded a slight fall few minutes later. However, it gained it stability and recorded a gain of 31.17 points reaching 24,810.17.At present, it is trading at 24,654.23 points, which is a fall of 151.60 points or 0.61 percent.The early gainers and losers for the day are:Gainers:Symb           Last          Change       Chg %ASGI.BO       58.35           +9.70      +19.94REAL.BO       30.30          +4.45       +17.21RPCC.BO      40.70           +2.70        +7.11SANG.BO     45.20           +2.90          +6.86CPA.BO         65.00          +1.95        +3.09Losers:Symb             Last            Change      Chg %OMEG.BO       52.00           -5.75        -9.96SHGT.BO        32.20          -2.55         -7.34OSCM.BO        235.00        -15.30       -6.11MMWW.BO      3.08            -0.15       -4.64CTEL.BO        7.40              -0.35         -4.52Meanwhile on Wednesday, the shares recorded a fall after registering closing highs in earlier sessions. The BSE index fell 0.21 percent as figures of IT companies such as Tata Consultancy Services dipped due to concerns of the effect of a stronger rupee.Infosys ended 1.1 percent lower than its previous figures, and HCL Technologies recorded a loss of 3 percent.Pharmaceutical majors such as Dr.Reddy’s Laboratories and Sun Pharmaceutical Industries also recorded a drop of 1.2 percent and 0.8 percent respectively.On the other hand, shares of fertilizer brands like Chambal Fertilisers and Chemicals rose 6.5 percent and Rashtriya Chemicals and Fertilizers clocked a surge of 6 percent. Additionally shares in insurance companies also recorded gains, amidst hopes that the new government might increase the Foreign Direct Investment limit in the sector from 26 percent to 49 percent.Max India surged 13 percent, while Reliance Capital and Bajaj Finserv gained 4.6 percent and 5 percent.(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more

Thai princess Sirindhorn arrives in Dhaka

first_imgThai princess Sirindhorn. Photo: CollectedThailand’s princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn arrived Dhaka on Monday on a four-day visit at the invitation of foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali.The princess is leading an 11-member high-profile Thai government delegation to visit philanthropic projects she set up in Bangladesh in 2011 under her father, late King Bhumibols’s Royal Chai Pattana Foundation, reports UNB.State minister for foreign affairs M Shahriar Alam received the Thai princess at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport on her arrival in the afternoon. Bangladesh Ambassador in Bangkok Saida Muna Tasneem was present.Shahriar who attended funeral of Sirindhorn’s father had a brief discussion with the Thai princess at the airport, an official told UNB.On the first day, she visited Liberation War Museum in the city and took a tour of different galleries of the Museum.Officials at the museum described the brutalities carried out by Pakistan army during 1971 Liberation War.The Thai princes also attended dinner hosted by Thai Ambassador in Dhaka.During her four-day visit to Bangladesh, the princess is scheduled to meet prime minister Sheikh Hasina, foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali and exchange views with agriculture minister Matia Chowdhury and culture minister Asaduzzaman Noor and other dignitaries, officials said.The princess is also scheduled to visit various on-going royal projects in Bangladesh, under the Royal Chaipattana Foundation including public health and sanitation projects for school children, sustainable agriculture projects for farmers in Bangladesh and the Sufficiency Economy Learning Centre at the Bangladesh Agriculture Development Corporation — all under the ‘Sufficiency Economic Philosophy’ pioneered by her late father King Bhumibol.She will also inaugurate a new environmental conservation project taken in collaboration with the environment and forest ministry of Bangladesh, titled “Bangladesh-Thailand Vetiver Grass Development Project to prevent hill erosion in Chattogram” on 30 May at Tiger Pass in Chattogram City.The Thai princess is also scheduled to visit the Ethnological Origins Museum in Chattogram and meet autistic and special children at the Proyash Institute of Special Education in Dhaka Cantonment, meet children and farmers at the Azampur Government Primary School, Uttara, Mariali Government Primary School, Gazipur and Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation in Dhaka.She will also attend dinner to be hosted by foreign minister Ali in her honour.last_img read more

Chameleons ballistic tongue inspires robotic manipulators

first_img Why chameleon tongues work in the cold (w/ Video) Explore further When fully extended, a chameleon’s tongue can reach twice the chameleon’s body length. Image credit: G. A. Boulenger. Wikimedia Commons. Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. More information: Alexis Debray. “Manipulators inspired by the tongue of the chameleon.” Bioinsp. Biomim. 6 (2011) 026002 (15pp). DOI:10.1088/1748-3182/6/2/026002 With the aim to mimic the mechanisms and performance of the chameleon’s tongue, researcher Alexis Debray of Canon, Inc., in Tokyo, Japan, has developed four ballistic robotic manipulators. Each of the four manipulators excels at copying a certain part of the chameleon’s tongue, and insights from each design could eventually be combined to create a more advanced chameleon tongue that could have manufacturing applications. Debray’s study is published in a recent issue of Bioinspiration & Biomimetics.“As far as I know, this is the first published demonstration of manipulators based on the chameleon tongue,” Debray told PhysOrg.com. “The particular mechanism of the tongue of the chameleon allows for fast accelerations and velocities and also applies no force during most of the motion.”As Debray explains, what we normally think of as the tongue of the chameleon is actually a larger system called the hyolingual apparatus. The tongue is just a small component on the front tip of the hyolingual apparatus. The majority of the hyolingual apparatus consists of the long, thin hyoglossus complex, which is the part that folds up like an accordion inside the chameleon’s mouth. The rapid movement of the chameleon’s hyolingual apparatus involves three phases: projection, catching, and retraction. Each of these three phases is controlled by a different system. The tongue (tip of the hyolingual apparatus) contains the accelerator muscle and collagens that control the projection. When the chameleon is ready to project, it slowly protrudes its tongue out of its mouth. Then, the tongue’s accelerator muscle projects the tongue off a bone inside the chameleon’s mouth. No applied force is needed to keep the tongue – and the rest of the hyolingual apparatus – moving forward. When the tongue reaches its prey, a tongue pad containing a small suction on the tip of the tongue can stick to the prey. Finally, the hyoglossus muscle in the accordion-like hyoglossus complex retracts the tongue at a constant velocity. Although the three phases are controlled by different systems, they occur in a single smooth, continuous motion.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Like the chameleon tongue, Debray’s robotic manipulators use different specialized systems for projection, catching, and retraction. To project, all four manipulators use a coilgun in place of the chameleon tongue’s accelerator muscle. Elastomers and/or cotton string is used in place of the chameleon’s hyolingual apparatus. Instead of folding up like an accordion, the elastomers and string are wound around a reel. As for catching, the robotic manipulators use magnets on the tip of the elastomers, which attract magnetic “prey.” For retraction, the manipulators use either an elastomer, a DC motor connected to a reel and string, or a combination of both. One of the manipulators also had wings on the mobile part, which could allow researchers to take advantage of aerodynamic effects.“In the future, movable wings will allow controlling the trajectory after the ejection of the tongue, which is not possible now,” Debray said. “In our experiments, the wings are not movable. However, their aerodynamic effect on the trajectory of the tongue has been demonstrated experimentally. So far, aerodynamic effects have been poorly studied in the field of manipulators.”Using a high-speed camera, Debray could track the manipulators in motion. The results showed that the robotic manipulators could reach a projection velocity of 3.8 meters/second without the need for a continuously applied force, which is similar to the velocity of the chameleon tongue. In addition, the robotic manipulators could reach an acceleration of 919 meters/second2, which exceeds that of the chameleon (374 meters/second2). The manipulators that used a DC motor and string for retraction had the same extension ability as the chameleon tongue, and could also adapt to variations in the targets’ distances, as chameleons can. By incorporating various end effectors onto the robotic manipulators, the devices could have a variety of applications, especially for products passing on a factory line. For example, manipulators with sensors could be used to sense data on products. Stamps and catching devices could be used to deposit patterns and manipulate objects, respectively. Using a mechanism based on the chameleon’s ballistic tongue could provide certain advantages compared with other manipulators due to the small size and flexibility. Further, because ballistic manipulators do not apply a continuous force during their forward motion, an accidental collision would be less severe and likely cause less damage compared to a device being pushed forward. As Debray explained, the current manipulators lack reliability, and so they cannot yet be put to practical use.“The work presented in the paper is a first step towards manipulators inspired by the chameleon tongue,” Debray said. “Further development is needed in order to use them in factory lines. However, the ultimate goal of this work is the manufacture of Canon products such as cameras and printers, among others.” (PhysOrg.com) — Although the lungless salamander and some frog species have developed ballistic tongues, the chameleon’s ballistic tongue is the fastest, the longest, and the one that can catch the heaviest prey. A chameleon’s tongue can elongate more than six times its rest length, zipping forward at speeds of 3.5-10.5 meters/second – faster than a human eye can follow. The tongue is called ballistic because, like all ballistic objects, it moves freely without any applied force during its forward motion. Once the chameleon’s accordion-like tongue is ejected, it continues moving forward under its own inertia. Citation: Chameleon’s ballistic tongue inspires robotic manipulators (2011, April 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-04-chameleon-ballistic-tongue-robotic.htmllast_img read more