Woman hit by vehicle while crossing street in Orchards

first_imgA woman was hit by a vehicle Tuesday evening while she was crossing Northeast Gher Road near St. Andrew Lutheran Church. The accident was reported at 6:05 p.m. in the 5600 block of Gher Road in the Orchards area. The woman, whose name was not released, may have been crossing eastbound when she was struck by a northbound vehicle, said Vancouver police Officer Ilia Botvinnik. The woman was transported to a local hospital with injuries that were described as serious, but not life-threatening. The roadway where she crossed does not have a crosswalk. The driver, Shea Buckner, 23, remained on scene and cooperated with police investigating the collision, Botvinnik said. He said the collision appeared to be an accident and that no drugs or alcohol were involved.last_img

Sterling Transfer Site Goes To Winter Hours On Sunday

first_imgFacebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The hours at the Sterling transfer site change to 10am to 6pm, starting on Sunday. Beginning October 1 the transfer site is closed on Sundays through the winter. Questions? Call the Kenai Peninsula Borough Solid Waste Department (907) 262-9667. From October to May each year the landfill will be open 10am to 6pm, Monday-Saturday. The Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly voted back in 2016 to close Borough dumps on Sunday from October to May. October 1 will kick off the seasonal landfill closure. The Central Peninsula Landfill and Kasilof, Kenai, Nikiski and Sterling Transfer Sites will be closed on Sundays for the winter beginning October 1 through April 28, 2019. Sundays will re-open for the summer season.last_img

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Ashley Mason Graduates From Becker College

first_imgWORCESTER, MA — Ashley Mason, of Wilmington, graduated with a AS in Veterinary Science, Veterinary Technology Concentration from Becker College. Mason was one of one hundred Becker students to graduate at the end of the fall semester.About Becker CollegeFounded in 1784, Becker College is an undergraduate and graduate, career-focused private college, providing a supportive and inclusive learning community that prepares graduates for their first to last careers. Nearly 1,800 students from the United States and around the world live and learn on the College’s Worcester and Leicester campuses. With nationally recognized programs in nursing, game design and animal studies, Becker has been consistently ranked as a “Best College” for undergraduate education by The Princeton Review.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Becker College via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Mason & Ravagni Graduate From Becker CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Mason & Ravagni Named To Dean’s List At Becker CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Cornish & Mason Named To Dean’s List At Becker CollegeIn “Education”last_img read more

Good governance essential for democracy

first_imgDanish ambassador in Bangladesh Mikael Hemniti Winther and Swedish ambassador Charlotta Schlyter speaking at Prothom Alo office on Sunday. Photo: Prothom AloGood governance and freedom of expression is a prerequisite to the development interests of any country. Bangladesh is no exception. These issues are essential in Bangladesh’s quest to attain mid-income status.The remarks were made by the Danish ambassador in Bangladesh Mikael Hemniti Winther and Swedish ambassador Charlotta Schlyter during a discussion at the Prothom Alo office on Sunday.The two ambassadors met with senior journalists of Prothom Alo at the newspaper’s office yesterday afternoon. Prothom Alo editor apprised them about the overall state of the media in the country as well as of Prothom Alo in particular.A video presentation was made of Prothom Alo’s various activities. A short film on social initiative against child marriage was also screened.Swedish ambassador Charlotta Schlyter said that her country attached high importance to freedom of expression. She mentioned the training in investigative journalism provided to various media organisations in Bangladesh with the support of the Swedish Fojo Institute.last_img read more

Thai princess Sirindhorn arrives in Dhaka

first_imgThai princess Sirindhorn. Photo: CollectedThailand’s princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn arrived Dhaka on Monday on a four-day visit at the invitation of foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali.The princess is leading an 11-member high-profile Thai government delegation to visit philanthropic projects she set up in Bangladesh in 2011 under her father, late King Bhumibols’s Royal Chai Pattana Foundation, reports UNB.State minister for foreign affairs M Shahriar Alam received the Thai princess at Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport on her arrival in the afternoon. Bangladesh Ambassador in Bangkok Saida Muna Tasneem was present.Shahriar who attended funeral of Sirindhorn’s father had a brief discussion with the Thai princess at the airport, an official told UNB.On the first day, she visited Liberation War Museum in the city and took a tour of different galleries of the Museum.Officials at the museum described the brutalities carried out by Pakistan army during 1971 Liberation War.The Thai princes also attended dinner hosted by Thai Ambassador in Dhaka.During her four-day visit to Bangladesh, the princess is scheduled to meet prime minister Sheikh Hasina, foreign minister AH Mahmood Ali and exchange views with agriculture minister Matia Chowdhury and culture minister Asaduzzaman Noor and other dignitaries, officials said.The princess is also scheduled to visit various on-going royal projects in Bangladesh, under the Royal Chaipattana Foundation including public health and sanitation projects for school children, sustainable agriculture projects for farmers in Bangladesh and the Sufficiency Economy Learning Centre at the Bangladesh Agriculture Development Corporation — all under the ‘Sufficiency Economic Philosophy’ pioneered by her late father King Bhumibol.She will also inaugurate a new environmental conservation project taken in collaboration with the environment and forest ministry of Bangladesh, titled “Bangladesh-Thailand Vetiver Grass Development Project to prevent hill erosion in Chattogram” on 30 May at Tiger Pass in Chattogram City.The Thai princess is also scheduled to visit the Ethnological Origins Museum in Chattogram and meet autistic and special children at the Proyash Institute of Special Education in Dhaka Cantonment, meet children and farmers at the Azampur Government Primary School, Uttara, Mariali Government Primary School, Gazipur and Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation in Dhaka.She will also attend dinner to be hosted by foreign minister Ali in her honour.last_img read more

Britain suspends training of Myanmar army

first_imgMyanmar soldiers arrive to Buthidaung jetty after Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army`s (ARSA) attacks, at Buthidaung, Myanmar 29 August, 2017. Photo: ReutersBritain has suspended its training programme for military in Myanmar due to the violence in Rakhine state, a British government spokesman said on Tuesday.Human rights monitors and fleeing Rohingya say the army and Rakhine Buddhist vigilantes have mounted a campaign of arson aimed at driving out the Muslim population.“In light of the ongoing violence in Burma’s Rakhine state, the growing humanitarian crisis it has caused, and our deep concern about the human rights abuses that are taking place, we have decided to suspend the educational courses provided to the Burmese military until there is an acceptable resolution to the current situation,” the spokesman said in a statement.“We call on the Burmese Armed Forces to take immediate steps to stop the violence in Rakhine and ensure the protection of all civilians, to allow full access for humanitarian aid.”last_img

Typhoon batters Japan kills 6

first_imgVehicles damaged by Typhoon Jebi are seen in Osaka, western Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo on 4 September 2018. Photo: ReutersThe strongest typhoon to hit Japan in 25 years battered the west of the country Tuesday with violent winds and heavy rain, killing six and injuring scores more.Powerful gusts ripped sheeting from rooftops, overturned trucks on bridges and swept a tanker anchored in Osaka Bay into a bridge to Kansai International Airport.The damage to the bridge left the airport cut off from the mainland and stranded around 3,000 people there, an official told AFP.The airport was now conducting safety tests on the undamaged section of the bridge, the official said, but it remained unclear when the passengers could leave.High waves whipped up by the storm also flooded parts of the airport, where all flights were cancelled, and the severe weather caused power outages and travel chaos across much of the country.Typhoon Jebi made landfall around noon, slamming into the west of the country with winds of up to 216 kilometres (135 miles) per hour.The fast-moving storm quickly crossed the mainland, and by nightfall was heading out to sea from Ishikawa in central Japan.Public broadcaster NHK reported at least six deaths in the storm, including a 71-year-old man killed in western Shiga prefecture after being trapped under a warehouse that collapsed in strong wind.NHK said 164 people had suffered mostly minor injuries.In Osaka television footage showed the large tanker smashing into the bridge connecting the city of Izumisano with Kansai airport, with its superstructure battering away part of the bridge.Local TV also showed footage of a 100-metre (328-feet) tall ferris wheel in Osaka spinning furiously in the strong wind despite being switched off.“I’ve never seen such a thing,” a 19-year-old boy at the scene told NHK.Elsewhere, the winds whipped away part of the ceiling from Kyoto station and peeled off multi-storey scaffolding on a building in Osaka.- Evacuations urged -The storm left more than one million households without power and evacuation advisories were issued at one point for nearly 1.2 million people, with another 16,000 under stronger-though still not mandatory-evacuation orders.Prime minister Shinzo Abe had urged people to evacuate early and ordered his government to take all necessary measures to protect residents, after the weather agency warned of landslides, flooding and violent winds, as well as high tides, lightning and tornadoes.“I urge the Japanese people to take action to protect your lives, including preparing and evacuating early,” he said.Arriving on land, Jebi had winds of up to 162 kilometres (100 miles) per hour at its centre, making it a “very strong” typhoon, the weather agency’s chief forecaster Ryuta Kurora told AFP.“This is (the strongest) since 1993.”Local media warned that the wind was strong enough to topple traditional-style wooden houses as well as power poles, and urged people in affected areas to avoid non-essential travel.Primary and middle schools in the storm’s path were closed while regional businesses including Universal Studios Japan in Osaka and factories for several large manufacturers shut down.Nearly 800 flights were cancelled, including several international flights departing and arriving at Nagoya and Osaka, along with ferries, local train services and some bullet train lines.Jebi had a similar trajectory to Typhoon Cimaron which made landfall on 23 August, disrupting transport but causing limited damage and few injuries.Japan is regularly struck by major storms during the summer and autumn.The country has been sweating through a record deadly heatwave that followed devastating rain in parts of central and western Japan that killed over 200 people.The sustained rain caused widespread flooding and landslides in July, devastating entire villages and forcing thousands from their homes.The flooding and landslides proved so deadly in part because many people did not heed evacuation warnings, which are not mandatory.Since the disaster, authorities have urged people to take the warnings more seriously and prepare to leave home immediately they are issued.last_img read more

Time found to be fixed to terrain for Papua New Guinea tribe

first_imgIn interviewing many of the people that live in Gua, the researchers found that when asked questions about the past or the future, their responses were almost always relative to their position along the river. The past was downriver, the future was upriver, regardless of which direction the river happened to be flowing.Interestingly, the perspective of time changed for the villagers when inside their homes. There the past was represented by the doorway, and the future away from the door, which might seem counterintuitive until noting that for those that live in Gua, the doorway is always seen as downhill which is likely to promote drainage after rains; both water and time, flowing away when viewed from the vantage point of those sitting safely inside their homes. The Yupno people live in a village called Gua. There are no roads leading in or out and the only other people the villagers see are the occasional missionaries, researchers or governmental health workers. Thus, their way of life hasn’t changed much, as most of the rest of the world marched into what we now perceive as a very modern society. And because of that, the Yupno people have retained their own interpretation of time, and for them, it’s all about the river. And because of that, time for them can be construed as running straight, as it does for us westerners, but only where the river runs straight. Where it kinks, so too does time. Future is uphill; past is downhill. Image (c) [i]Cognition[/i], DOI:10.1016/j.cognition.2012.03.007 © 2012 Phys.Org Journal information: Cognition This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: Contours of time: Topographic construals of past, present, and future in the Yupno valley of Papua New Guinea, Cognition, dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cognition.2012.03.007AbstractTime, an everyday yet fundamentally abstract domain, is conceptualized in terms of space throughout the world’s cultures. Linguists and psychologists have presented evidence of a widespread pattern in which deictic time—past, present, and future—is construed along the front/back axis, a construal that is linear and ego-based. To investigate the universality of this pattern, we studied the construal of deictic time among the Yupno, an indigenous group from the mountains of Papua New Guinea, whose language makes extensive use of allocentric topographic (uphill/downhill) terms for describing spatial relations. We measured the pointing direction of Yupno speakers’ gestures—produced naturally and without prompting—as they explained common expressions related to the past, present, and future. Results show that the Yupno spontaneously construe deictic time spatially in terms of allocentric topography: the past is construed as downhill, the present as co-located with the speaker, and the future as uphill. Moreover, the Yupno construal is not linear, but exhibits a particular geometry that appears to reflect the local terrain. The findings shed light on how, our universal human embodiment notwithstanding, linguistic, cultural, and environmental pressures come to shape abstract concepts. Citation: Time found to be fixed to terrain for Papua New Guinea tribe (2012, June 4) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-terrain-papua-guinea-tribe.html (Phys.org) — For most of western history, people have assumed that what is true of “us” in most cases, must be true for “them,” i.e. other groups about which we may actually know little. One example is the concept of time. In virtually all western societies, people envision time in the same abstract way; as a line moving from the past, through us, and on into the future. We speak of back in the past, or moving forward into the future. And because our way of thinking about time is so ingrained in us it’s difficult to imagine that others might really see time in radically different ways. And yet, some do, as evidenced by a remote tribe of people currently living in Papua New Guinea. The Yupno, a team of researchers has found, relate time to the river that dominates their life. The past is water that has already flowed by, while the future is represented by its source, which for them, lies uphill. Rafael Núñeza, Kensy Cooperridera, D Doana and Jürg Wassmannb studied the Yupno and found, as they report in their paper published in Cognition, that some people living in circumstances far different than that seen in the western world, really do see time in a completely different way. Explore further Learned, not innate human intuition: Study finds twist to the story of the number linelast_img read more

HBO Asia has launched the streaming services mult

first_imgHBO Asia has launched the streaming service’s multiscreen OTT TV offering HBO Go in Vietnam.HBO Asia, its Vietnam agent Q.net and their platform partner FPT Play unveiled the launch at a press conference in Ho Chi Minh City. HBO Go is now available on the FPT Play app.HBO Go Asia offers series, movies and documentaries from the US and Asia, Hollywood blockbusters, Asian hit movies and kids programmes. The latest series will premiere on HBO GO on the same day as the US.Jonathan Spink, CEO of HBO Asia said that the service would soon be available on more platforms. Subscribers will also be able to live stream HBO, Max by HBO and Red by HBO channels which are subtitled in Vietnamese.Nguyen Hanh, Q.net president said that the group had been preparing to unveil HBO Go in the market for over three years, ensuring that the service was in full compliance with local law.Vu Anh Tu, deputy general director of FPT Telecom, said that the launch would mark “the first time young Vietnamese audiences have a chance to enjoy Band of Brothers, the latest season of Game of Thrones, and thousands of blockbusters and action programming on platforms including smartphone, tablet, smart TV, the web and FPT Play Box”.“The launch of HBO GO marked a critical breakthrough for FPT Play in providing the best audience experience. Working with a world-leading content provider, we will do our utmost to utilize technologies and infrastructure capable of offering audiences the most entertaining and relaxing programming, worthy of the No. 1-rated OTT service provider in Vietnam,” he said.last_img read more