Sesame Street invades Game of Thrones Westworld for good cause

first_img Game of Thrones HBO Westworld 0 Tags There’s a dissonance that comes from seeing beloved Sesame Street muppets engaging with some of television’s deadliest characters. No blood is shed and respect wins the day, giving us feel-good alternate timelines that depart significantly from the grim and gory stories we’re used to.Now can we all just hug? Share your voice Season 8 premiere slays show’s own viewer record Premiere recap: Reunions, dragons and Bran is always watching Game of Thrones returns 57 Photoscenter_img Game of Thrones stars, from season 1 through today The Westworld video is called “Respect World” and features Jeffrey Wright (Bernard) and Evan Rachel Wood (Dolores) sitting inside a lab room when Cookie Monster arrives. He calls Dolores “robot lady” and delivers a lecture on respect illustrated through the sharing of a cookie.  Be sure to stick around for the Sesame Street theme rendered by a player piano manned by the Two-Headed Monster. The footage starts off like a normal Game of Thrones scenario as Cersei and Tyrion argue. Elmo, dressed in armor, shows up to talk the pair through their issues. The video is meant to highlight the importance of respecting one another, even in the case of sworn enemies. It wraps ups with a joke about the meaning of “toast.” While the Sesame Street crossover isn’t canon, those of us pining for a happily-ever-after ending for all the residents of Game of Thrones can pretend it is. Besides, a fuzzy red bug-eyed creature isn’t any more fantastical than a bunch of dragons. Post a comment Enlarge ImageCookie Monster takes his chances in Westworld. Video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET Cersei Lannister and Tyrion Lannister might be siblings, but there’s not much love between them. They may never have warm feelings, but they can at least respect each other. They just need a little help from furry red Elmo from Sesame Street.Bernard and Dolores from Westworld also have plenty to say to each other about violent delights having violent ends, but Cookie Monster can convince them to see their conflicts a little differently.HBO airs Game of Thrones, Sesame Street and Westworld. That’s why we now have some unlikely crossovers timed for the children show’s 50th anniversary celebration. One video, titled “Sesame Street: Respect is Coming,” brings together Cersei (Lena Headey), Tyrion (Peter Dinklage) and Elmo to resolve a tense scene.  TV and Movieslast_img read more

India drafts policy to claim stake in Global Internet of Things by

first_imgIndia is drafting a policy to have 5-6% of the $300-billion global Internet of Things (IoT) business by 2020, a top official said on Monday.”A policy framework is in consultation stage for getting a five-six percent share of the global IoT industry, which is estimated to be $300 billion by 2020,” department of electronics and IT secretary JS Deepak said at a summit here.The policy will also enable the sun rise electronics industry to generate $15 billion domestic market over the next five years.”Under IoT, various devices can be connected with internet for sharing data among a specified community,” Deepak said at a national meet on IoT, organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry, the apex body of India Inc.The government has also drawn a roadmap to develop machine-to-machine (M2M) for the IoT industry.”IoT will be central to Digital India structure, with M2M communications around it,” Deepak added.Minister of State for Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation Babulal Supriyo told the delegates that a lot of power could be saved by switching off street lights automatically through connected devices.”IoT is the most happening trend, with the potential to transform all industries and help develop 100 smart cities across the country through contribution from each stakeholder in the country,” Supriyo added.The summit highlighted the proof of concepts and solutions in four sectors — energy, healthcare, transport and manufacturing and the solutions that are replicable in the Indian context.last_img read more

US Senate fails Trumps Obamacare repeal efforts

first_imgSen John McCain (R-AZ) leaves the Senate Chamber after a vote on a stripped-down, or `Skinny Repeal,` version of Obamacare reform on 28 July, 2017 in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPIn a stinging blow to US president Donald Trump, US Senate Republicans failed on Friday to dismantle Obamacare, falling short on a major campaign promise and perhaps ending a seven-year quest by their party to gut the healthcare law.Voting in the early hours, three Republican senators, John McCain, Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski, crossed party lines to join Democrats in a dramatic 49-to-51 vote to reject a “skinny repeal” bill that would have eliminated some parts of Obamacare.“This is clearly a disappointing moment,” Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell told the Senate floor right after the vote. “The American people are going to regret that we couldn’t find a better way forward.”Trump’s failure sent the dollar down against a basket of other currencies on Friday. [FRX/]The setback leaves him without a major legislative win after more than six months in power, even though Republicans control the White House, Senate and House of Representatives. He had been expected to make rapid changes to healthcare, taxes and infrastructure spending.“3 Republicans and 48 Democrats let the American people down. As I said from the beginning, let Obamacare implode, then deal. Watch!” Trump tweeted after the vote.No Clear GuidanceTrump has repeatedly berated congressional Republicans for being unable to overcome internal divisions to repeal Obamacare, but has offered no legislation himself, nor any clear guidance on what he would like to do about replacing the law.The president has demanded at various times that Obamacare should be allowed to collapse on its own, that it should be repealed without replacement, and that it should be repealed and replaced.The Affordable Care Act, approved by Democrats in 2010, was President Barack Obama’s signature domestic achievement. It provided health insurance to millions of uninsured Americans, but was denounced from the outset by Republicans who viewed it as government intrusion on people’s healthcare decisions.The voting down of the bill still leaves uncertainty in the healthcare industry, with insurers not sure how long the Trump administration will continue to make billions of dollars in Obamacare payments that help cover out-of-pocket medical expenses for low-income Americans.Insurers have until September to set rates for 2018 health plans in many marketplaces. Some insurers, including Anthem Inc, Humana and Aetna have pulled out of Obamacare markets, citing the uncertainty over the payments. Others have raised rates by double digits.Republicans hold 52 seats in the 100-seat Senate. McConnell, whose reputation as a master legislative tactician was on the line, could afford to lose support from only two Republican senators, with the tie-breaking vote to be cast by Vice President Mike Pence, who was on the Senate floor.After the House passed a bill to repeal and replace Obamacare in May, McConnell grappled to get Republicans in the Senate to agree on their version of the bill. Conservatives wanted a bill that would substantially gut Obamacare, while moderates were concerned over legislation that could deprive millions of Americans of their healthcare coverage.Republicans released the skinny bill just three hours before voting began. It would have retroactively repealed the Obamacare penalty on individuals who do not purchase health insurance, repealed for eight years a penalty on certain employers who do not provide employees with insurance and repealed a medical device tax until 2020. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated that if it became law, 15 million fewer Americans would be insured in 2018 than under existing law.Drama Over MccainAs the vote approached, all eyes in the Senate chamber were on McCain. The former Republican presidential nominee and Vietnam war hero flew back from Arizona after being diagnosed with brain cancer in order to vote, and sat talking to Collins, Murkowski, and Republican Senator Jeff Flake, also from Arizona.Collins and Murkowski both voted this week against more comprehensive Republican proposals to repeal and replace Obamacare and they were both known to have concerns about the pared-down proposal. Trump had criticized Murkowski, tweeting that she had let down the Republican Party and the country.McCain was then approached before voting began by Pence and Republican Senator Lindsey Graham, who had said on Thursday he would support the skinny repeal bill after reassurances from House Speaker Paul Ryan that it would not become law.After speaking to Pence and Graham, McCain walked across the Senate floor to tell Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and other Democrats that he would vote with them. They laughed as McCain said that the reporters in the balcony could probably read his lips. Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein embraced him.When McCain walked to the front of the Senate chamber to cast his deciding “no” vote, giving a thumbs down, Democrats cheered, knowing the bill would fail.After the bill’s defeat, Schumer told the Senate that it was time to heed McCain’s call this week to return to a more transparent and bipartisan legislative process.Schumer told reporters that he and McCain had been talking four or five times a day this week about the pared-down bill and that McCain had made up his mind on Thursday afternoon. “John McCain is a hero,” Schumer said.Democrats, and some Republicans, said the bill’s failure could present an opportunity for the two parties to work together to fix problematic areas of the Obamacare law without repealing it.“We now have an opportunity to regroup and pull things together through an open and full committee process, bipartisan participation,” Murkowski told reporters.McCain also urged a bipartisan approach, saying in a statement after the vote, “one of the major failures of Obamacare was that it was rammed through Congress by Democrats on a strict-party line basis without a single Republican vote”.Other Republicans said it was time to move on to other legislative priorities such as tax reform.“This was a heavy lift. We should have taken our time. We should have first turned to tax reform and that’s what we’ll do now,” Republican Senator Ron Johnson told reporters.last_img

Rohingya crisis consequence of social hatred Amnesty

first_imgRohingya refugee. Photo: Syful-IslamThe crisis in Myanmar and reported massacres of Rohingya Muslims are the consequence of a society encouraged to hate and a lack of global leadership on human rights, Amnesty International said on Thursday.The human rights group said in its annual report covering 159 countries that “hate-filled rhetoric” by leaders was normalising discrimination against minorities.”We saw the ultimate consequence of a society encouraged to hate, scapegoat and fear minorities laid bare in the horrific military campaign of ethnic cleansing against the Rohingya people in Myanmar,” said Salil Shetty, secretary general of Amnesty.Last week, the United States urged the UN Security Council to hold Myanmar’s military accountable for what it said was the ethnic cleansing of Rohingya Muslims.Nearly 690,000 Rohingya have fled Rakhine and taken refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh since the Myanmar military launched a crackdown on insurgents at the end of August, according to the UN.More than 6,500 Rohingya are currently trapped on a strip of unclaimed land between Myanmar and Bangladesh.Amnesty said the international community had failed to respond robustly to “crimes against humanity and war crimes from Myanmar to Iraq, South Sudan, Syria and Yemen”.It said that leaders in countries such as the United States, Russia and China were not standing up for civil liberties and instead were “callously undermining the rights of millions”.Amnesty said president Donald Trump had taken backward steps on human rights that were setting a dangerous precedent. Shetty described his move to ban people from several Muslim-majority countries in January last year as “transparently hateful”.Last year’s report accused Trump of “poisonous” rhetoric.Free speech will be a key issue for those concerned about human rights this year, the report said.Amnesty said its staff were arrested at an unprecedented rate in Turkey in 2017, which along with Egypt and China was also among the biggest jailors of journalists.Two Reuters reporters in Myanmar were arrested while investigating the killing of Rohingya Muslims. Court proceedings are ongoing.”In 2018, we cannot take for granted that we will be free to gather together in protest or to criticise our governments. In fact, speaking out is becoming more dangerous,” Shetty said.Read More: Myanmar ‘bulldozing Rohingya mass grave to hide evidence’last_img read more