See NASAs InSight Mars lander try to squish the soil

first_img Share your voice I’ve pressed down next to the “mole” several times, and it’s hard to make this unusual soil collapse into the pit. Soon, I’ll be out of contact for a couple of weeks during solar conjunction, but my team on Earth will keep working it. Keep sending good vibes! ✨ pic.twitter.com/dbUcnXzYzm— NASA InSight (@NASAInSight) August 16, 2019 NASA and DLR, the German Aerospace Center that created the instrument, are trying to collapse the soil around the pit the mole has already created, hoping to give it something to bite into. The mole is meant to burrow as far as 16 feet (5 meters), but it hit the snag at a depth of just 12 inches (30 centimeters).Collapsing the hole and giving the digging instrument more friction might help the cause, but it’s also possible the mole has hit a rock it just can’t get past. The InSight team is still optimistic about finding a solution.  InSight’s insights Sci-Tech Enlarge ImageNASA’s Insight lander took this selfie in late 2018. NASA/JPL-Caltech NASA’s InSight lander has a perplexing problem. The lander’s “mole,” a device that’s designed to burrow deep under the planet’s surface, got stuck pretty quickly after it deployed early in 2019. The heat probe just isn’t digging like it’s supposed to. So InSight is patting the ground in an attempt to unstick it.The InSight team posted a fascinating GIF to Twitter on Friday showing the process. “I’ve pressed down next to the ‘mole’ several times, and it’s hard to make this unusual soil collapse into the pit,” the team wrote.  NASA InSight lander rocks its journey to Mars: A view in pictures The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Probe is designed to detect the planet’s interior temperature. InSight’s mission is focused on taking the planet’s vital signs so we can learn more about how rocky planets like Earth and Mars form. Even if the mole moves no more, InSight will have plenty of other science activities to keep it busy, including the monitoring of marsquakes. The lander will be out of touch for a couple of weeks, but the InSight team will get back to troubleshooting soon. In the meantime, please enjoy the view of a machine pushing soil around on another planet.center_img Tags 0 22 Photos Post a comment NASA InSight hears ‘haunting low rumble’ on Mars NASA InSight lander catches a shadowy eclipse on Mars Mars rovers NASA Spacelast_img read more

Woman murdered in moving bus father pushed off in Savar

first_imgProthom Alo IllustrationA woman was allegedly killed inside a moving bus and her father was pushed off it by some bus employees including the driver, on Dhaka-Tangail highway at Moragang on Friday night, reports UNB.The deceased is Jarina Khatun, 45, daughter of Ali Akbar, 75, hailing from Khajkawali village in Chowhali of Sirajganj.Jarina along with his father came to visit her daughter Rozina’s house at Ashulia from Sirajganj, said Rizaul Haque Dipu, officer-in-charge of Ashulia police station.In the evening, they boarded a Tangail-bound bus from Unique area for returning home.At one stage, the bus driver, its helper and four other people attacked Jarina and her father.They beat them up and snatched their mobile phone sets and cash, the OC said quoting Jarina’s father Akbar.Later, they pushed Akbar off the running bus in Ashulia bridge area, leaving him injured.When Ali Akbar informed the matter to patrol police, they recovered Jarina’s body from Moragang area near the highway around 8:30pm.”The body bore injury marks on its neck,” said the OC adding that she might have been thrown off the bus after being strangulated to death.last_img read more

Commission Begins Discussing Texas School Finance Overhaul

first_img Share ILLUSTRATION BY TODD WISEMAN / TEXAS TRIBUNEA special commission has begun discussing how to remake Texas’ school finance system, 18-plus months after the state Supreme Court declared it deeply flawed but still barely constitutional.That ruling spared the Legislature from having to overhaul how Texas pays for educating around 5.3 million students. Instead, many top Republicans backed unsuccessful voucher plans offering public money to children attending private schools.Gov. Greg Abbott then convened a bipartisan group of lawmakers and education leaders which met Tuesday to weigh new ideas before the Legislature next convenes in 2019.Top conservatives chiefly want a system that will cut local property taxes, which have skyrocketed because they pay for the bulk of public school costs.Other members argue that property taxes won’t fall without Texas dramatically increasing state spending on classrooms.last_img read more

Apparent roadblock in the development of quantum lithography

first_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com (PhysOrg.com) — Just when it began to appear that scientists had found a viable way around the problem of the blurring that occurs when using masks to create smaller and smaller silicon wafers for computer chips, a previous study on beam splitting optics showed that the new approach would not work, at least as it has thus far been proposed. A group of researchers explain why in a paper in New Journal of Physics. Quantum electronics: Two photons and chips Currently, the silicon wafers that make up computer chips are made by the process of lithography, whereby optics are used to create an image on a piece of wafer. To create the channels that make up the transistors, masks are used to prevent some of the photons directed towards a wafer from arriving. When the wafer is then immersed in special chemicals, the parts that were struck react differently than those that weren’t, creating the channels. The problem is in the clarity of the image produced on the other side due to the use of optic lenses to focus the photons, as some degree of blurring will always occur due to the nature of lenses. As researchers try to make smaller transistors, the blurring eventually becomes a roadblock, which is why some are looking for alternatives.One such approach is to take advantage of the unique properties of entangled photons; those wily quantum particles that for some inexplicable reason, tend to mimic the behavior of one another, without any apparent means of communication, and at a rate faster than the speed of light. Because they are correlated, the thinking went, they’d always arrive at the same place at the same time (in this case a sensor) creating a near perfect image; so if say a mask were made, in this case a simple one with just two slits in it; it would make sense that the pair of entangled photons would interfere with one another as they tend to do, as they pass through the slit, then arrive together on the other side at exactly the same place and time, which is just what you’d need if you wanted to impact the material on the other side to create your wafer the way you intended. Unfortunately, things haven’t worked out quite that way, because as it turns out, while you can expect a pair of entangled photons to do their thing simultaneously, you can’t rely on them to arrive at the same target, or again in this case, the same sensor, while they are doing so; which of course is a big problem if you’re trying to make a wafer where the photons have to hit their target not only at exactly the same time, but in exactly the right place or you’ve got nothing to show for your efforts.Even so, researchers hoped that enough photons would arrive in the same place at the same time by chance to allow for the process to work; but this meant adding in an exposure time (waiting for enough of the photons to arrive at the same place) which as it turned out rose too rapidly as the feature size requirements went up, making the process unfeasible.While it appears the original idea for using entangled photons for the development of quantum lithography won’t work, researchers aren’t giving up hope just yet; the stakes are too high. The hope now is that some other new imaginative way can be thought of to get around the problems encountered, allowing for the creation of almost unimaginably small chips. Citation: Apparent roadblock in the development of quantum lithography (2011, May 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-apparent-roadblock-quantum-lithography.html More information: On the efficiency of quantum lithography, Christian Kothe et al 2011 New J. Phys. 13 043028 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/13/4/043028AbstractQuantum lithography promises, in principle, unlimited feature resolution, independent of wavelength. However, in the literature, at least two different theoretical descriptions of quantum lithography exist. They differ in the extent to which they predict that the photons retain spatial correlation from generation to absorption, and although both predict the same feature size, they vastly differ in predicting how efficiently a quantum lithographic pattern can be exposed. Until recently, essentially all quantum lithography experiments have been performed in such a way that it is difficult to distinguish between the two theoretical explanations. However, last year an experiment was performed that gives different outcomes for the two theories. We comment on the experiment and show that the model that fits the data unfortunately indicates that the trade-off between resolution and efficiency in quantum lithography is very unfavourable. Explore further When sending two photons through a double slit they will produce an interference pattern on a detection line after the slits. Denoting the arrival position of the photons with s and t one can plot the detection probability where lighter colour indicates higher probability. If the photons are constrained to arrive at the same place the left figure applies; if they propagate independently the right figure applies. Image credit: New J. Phys. 13 043028 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/13/4/043028 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Amazon is reportedly going after video rights for

first_imgAmazon is reportedly going after video rights for professional sports, including tennis, rugby and golf.According to a Bloomberg report, which cites people with knowledge of the matter, Amazon has expressed interest in sport with a global appeal, which also includes soccer and auto racing.The online retail giant is also reportedly interested in US sports like baseball and basketball, even though the rights are not currently up for grabs.Bloomberg said that while the progress of Amazon’s sports rights talks are not clear, this year the company hired executives formerly from Sports Illustrated and YouTube to oversee a sports division, as well as sports partnerships and business development.Moving into sport would differentiate Amazon’s video offering from the likes of Netflix, with the latter’s CEO, Reed Hastings, recently commenting that Netflix is not interested in adding sport and news to the SVOD company’s content line-up.In December Amazon partnered with major TV networks and content makers like Showtime, Starz and AMC – in order to offer additional content subscriptions through Amazon Video.According to details revealed in a string of company job posts this summer, Amazon is now also planning to launch this streaming partners programme in Europe.last_img read more