JUST 380 OF 900 WATER LEAKS ACROSS DONEGAL FIXED THIS YEAR

first_imgIrish Water has managed to fix just 380 of the 900 leaks targeted across Co Donegal this year.A huge amount of leaks across Donegal have still not been fixed.The figures are part of an overall countrywide breakdown found by an RTE investigation.Outside centres of major urban population like Dublin, Cork and Limerick, Donegal has one of the highest amounts of unfixed leaks. The disclosure comes as it was revealed that investment by Irish Water in infrastructure this year is set to be significantly lower than the average annual spend by Government over the previous ten years.Documents show the company’s capital spend on infrastructure up to November this year was €300m.The average annual spend by Government between 2004 and 2013 was €430m. Other documents show Irish Water is on course to fix the same number of leaks this year as were repaired last year.However plans to fix leaks in Co Donegal is considerably down.This is despite a massive water meter installation programme that the company said would help it to find leaks.However, the last two years has seen the lowest level of investment in water services since 1998.Investment peaked at €512m in 2009, but the Government spent just €275m in 2013, as it prepared to hand over the system to Irish Water.In the first 11 months of this year, Irish Water spent just under €300m. It is committed to investing €1.77 billion over the three years 2014, 2015 and 2016.On leaks, the company has predicted that installing water meters will help it to pinpoint where water is being lost.However, despite installing half 500,000 meters, it is on course to repair around the same number of leaks as last year, at just over 26,000.The company said it had made significant progress identifying and fixing some major water leaks and its capital spend will be €340m by the end of this year. JUST 380 OF 900 WATER LEAKS ACROSS DONEGAL FIXED THIS YEAR was last modified: December 23rd, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:donegalIrish Waterleakslast_img read more

Business Gains Drive Higher R&D Spending in U.S.

first_imgThe U.S. research ship is righting itself after going through some stormy seas, according to data from the National Science Foundation (NSF). But the latest picture of overall R&D spending in the United States shows two divergent trends: High-tech companies are steaming ahead after rebounding from the 2008 recession, while the end of the massive stimulus spending begun in 2009 has left academic researchers facing increasingly choppy waters.The new NSF report released in late December, which updates a report from January 2013, documents a 5% boost in overall spending in 2011, to $428 billion. Preliminary data suggest 2012 will be even better: a jump of 5.7%, to $452 billion. Those annual increases are well ahead of the 4% growth in the country’s gross domestic product (GDP) in each of those years. They also mark a significant turnaround from 2009 and 2010, when both R&D and GDP struggled to stay above water.The good news, says NSF program analyst Mark Boroush, is that the numbers suggest a return to historical patterns in which the country’s total R&D investment grew at a faster rate than GDP. That was the case in 6 of the 8 years before the 2008 recession, he notes. Boroush says that metric is a good indicator of the health of a country’s overall research enterprise.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)U.S. industry performs roughly 70% of the country’s R&D. (It funds a similar percentage.) So its behavior drives the overall U.S. research enterprise. The federal government provides most of the rest of the money, although the dollars are distributed almost equally between scientists at federal facilities and those working in academia.“We saw a pullback in 2009 and 2010 in industrial R&D,” he says, with spending tumbling in both years. “But it appears we have a rebirth going on, with 2012 as the most solid year” for high-tech companies since 2007.Spending patterns for the academic sector are a mirror image of those in the industrial sector. Robust increases in 2009 and 2010 were fueled by the Obama administration’s stimulus package, and the line continued to tick upward in 2011. But NSF preliminary data suggest no growth in 2012, and Boroush expects the toll from the budget cuts known as sequestration, which took effect last March, to show up in NSF’s next report. “I think we may be back to a very sober picture in 2013,” he says.[wysiwyg_field wf_deltas=”3″ wf_field=”field_assets” wf_formatter=”styles_file_original” wf_settings-field_delimiter=”” wf_settings-field_multiple_limit=”-1″ wf_settings-field_multiple_limit_offset=”0″ contenteditable=”false” wf_cache=”1389880879″ wf_entity_id=”111406″ wf_entity_type=”node”] When adjusted for inflation, the data for R&D spending at colleges and universities are even more dismal. Annual growth rates of 4.6% in 2009 and 2010 shrunk to 1.3% in 2010 and 2011, according to the NSF data. And the rate is expected to go negative, by 1.3%, in 2012.The latest report added $14 billion to the 2011 U.S. total reported a year ago, which had represented an anemic growth of 1.8%. The new figures, Boroush says, clarify what had been a murky picture of the country’s recovery from the recession. They “reversed the dynamics for 2011,” he notes. In combination with the preliminary 2012 data, it also adds a second year of robust growth.Most of the plus-up comes from an additional $10.3 billion in industry spending. NSF revamped its survey of business R&D in 2008, and Boroush says that each year the foundation gets better at interpreting the answers to a key question about what companies expect to spend on R&D in the coming year.“The look ahead is a preliminary estimate,” he says, “not a forecast. And we’re reasonably confident that it will hold up.” The final answer comes later this year, when NSF’s next report on national R&D spending patterns tallies up the 2012 numbers—and takes its first shot at describing 2013.last_img read more

Related Wizz Air to launch new flights to GermanyW

first_img RelatedWizz Air to launch new flights to GermanyWizz Air will introduce two new flights to Germany in the springWizz Air plans to launch flights to Brno from London LutonWizz Air will launch new cheap flights to Brno from London LutonWizz Air to start Poznan-Milan flightsWizz Air to start Poznan-Milan flights Low-cost airline Wizz Air will launch flights to London Luton from its new base in Vilnius, Lithuania.The Hungarian-based airline will establish its 14th base in the Lithuanian capital, where it will base a brand new Airbus A320 aircraft from April 16th.In addition to London Luton, Wizz Air will introduce flights to Doncaster-Sheffield, Cork, Eindhoven, Stockholm-Skavsta, Milan-Bergamo, Rome-Fiumicino and Barcelona from Vilnius.Flights to London and Doncaster-Sheffield will be operated five times a week and twice a week respectively, with both routes commencing on April 17th.Jozsef Varadi, Wizz Air’s chief executive officer, said the airline is “extremely delighted” to meet its latest expansion milestone.”The opening of the Vilnius base will allow many people to enjoy our truly low fares coupled with excellent Wizz travel experience,” he commented.”Beyond further enhancing the travel opportunities in the Lithuanian market, we will create hundreds of local jobs and significant revenue uplift for the local tourism industry.”On December 16th, Wizz Air will launch direct flights to Brno, the Czech Republic’s second-largest city, from London Luton.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Maplast_img read more